University of Glasgow

Introduction

Founded in 1451, the University of Glasgow is the fourth oldest university in the English-speaking world, with Arts and Humanities being taught and researched since its inception. Today we are in the top 1% of the world's universities.

Over the last five centuries and more, we’ve constantly worked to push the boundaries of what’s possible. We’ve fostered the talents of seven Nobel laureates, one Prime Minister and Scotland’s inaugural First Minister. We’ve welcomed Albert Einstein to give a lecture on the origins of the general theory of relativity. Scotland’s first female medical graduates completed their degrees here in 1894 and in 1957, the first in Scotland to have an electronic computer.

All of this means that if you choose to study here, you will be following in the footsteps of innovators, Prime Ministers, philosophers, Emmy award winning producers, authors and leaders in the creative and cultural sector.

Our future

The University is expanding and evolving. Following the site of the Western Infirmary site in 2015, we plan to invest £1billion, transforming the university to achieve our vision of a world changing campus.

Work is nearly completed on the first phase of redevelopment of the Kelvin Hall. This iconic Glasgow building, for many years a sporting and leisure venue and home to the Transport Museum, is being given a new lease of life. A partnership has been formed involving Glasgow Museums, Glasgow Life, the Scottish Screen Archives from the National Library of Scotland and the University of Glasgow.

The Hunterian, with over 1.3 million objects in its collections, is one of the world’s finest university museums. New state of the art facilities at the Kelvin Hall will allow the College of Arts at the University of Glasgow to build on its international reputation for collection based research and teaching, allowing much greater access to collections while forging new academic and educational practice.

Facts and figures - University of Glasgow

  • is ranked 62nd in the world and is the first and only UK university to be rated as 5 Stars Plus overall. (QS World University Rankings 2015)
  • welcomes students from more than 140 countries worldwide
  • has more than 25,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students
  • has annual research income of more than £181m
  • is a member of the prestigious Russell Group of leading UK research universities
  • is ranked top in Scotland and third in the Russell Group in the National Student Survey 2015
  • is a founder member of Universitas 21, an international grouping of universities dedicated to setting worldwide standards for higher education
  • includes among its alumni, the father of economics Adam Smith, Scotland’s architect of devolution Donald Dewar and renowned physicist and engineer Lord Kelvin.
This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programmes

This school also offers:

Master

Master of Letters in Art History: Inventing Modern Art

Campus Full time August 2017 United Kingdom Glasgow

Inventing Modern Art enables you to understand how painting, design and architecture took new forms and meanings in an age of radical social, scientific and technological change. Working with leading experts, you will learn to interpret these from theoretical as well as object-based approaches. [+]

Art History: Inventing Modern Art, 1768-1918 MLitt Inventing Modern Art enables you to understand how painting, design and architecture took new forms and meanings in an age of radical social, scientific and technological change. Working with leading experts, you will learn to interpret these from theoretical as well as object-based approaches. Why this programme World-leading resources, from Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s School of Art to the Burrell Collection and The Hunterian, home to the world’s largest public Whistler display. State-of-the-art collections access at the new Kelvin Hall Study Centre, and tuition by specialists including the Mackintosh and European Modernism Academic Curator. Programme Structure The programme offers a wide-ranging mix of taught and research components, and is taught by a team including the Academic Curator in Mackintosh studies and European Modernism, and experts in the Enlightenment, Whistler, Impressionism, the Vienna Secession, and dress history.  The 20-credit core course on 'Research Methods in Practice' is taken by all students in Semester 1, and provides an introduction to the key techniques and principles of advanced art-historical study and research. This provides a foundation for the programme's other components, which consist of: A compulsory dissertation (60 credits; 15-20,000 words, including footnotes and bibliography). This is submitted in August and written under the guidance of a specialist tutor. It provides opportunity for self-directed research on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the programme convener and the tutor. Five individual option courses, each worth 20 credits. These enable you to study particular themes or artistic movements in depth, and, if desired, also to obtain work experience. They include opportunities for first-hand engagement with relevant work in local collections and the new Kelvin Hall Collections Study Centre, and are selected from the following list. Some courses are taught in Semester 1 and some in Semester 2 (not all are available each year): Whistler, Impressionism, and European Avant-Gardes Impressionism: Innovation and Invention 1874-1926 The Artistic House Reading International Art Nouveau Historicism: German Art, Architecture and Design 1850-1918 The Birth of Modern Fashion? Textiles and Dress, 1680-1815 Victorian Visions: Dress and Textiles c. 1837-1901 Scottish Textile Histories Object-based research in the decorative arts Collecting East Asian Art Scientists, Antiquarians and Collectors Landscape Art and the Geography of 18th Century Britain Cultures of Collecting Provenance Work Placement   Independent Study   Student Exhibition Semester Abroad (Ecole du Louvre, Paris) Research Forum   One or more of your option courses may be chosen from those available in other College of Arts subjects, to create a distinctive interdisciplinary emphasis within your degree. The programme convener will give guidance on choices relevant to your personal goals and interests.  Entry requirements for entry in 2017 Entry requirements for postgraduate taught programmes are a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject unless otherwise specified. Note: A minimum 2.1 in History of Art or a related subject is required. You should also submit a writing sample of 2-3000 words, a CV and a personal statement. International students  with  academic  qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution,  Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training): overall score 7.0 2 subtests not lower than 7.0 and no other sub-test lower than 6.5 or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification: Common equivalent English language qualifications All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme: ibTOEFL: 95; no sub-test less than:
 Reading: 23 Listening: 23 Speaking: 22 Writing: 24 CAE (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English):  185  overall; no sub-test less than  176 CPE (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English):  185  overall; no sub-test less than  176 PTE Academic (Pearson Test of English, Academic test):  68; no sub-test less than  62 For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for degree level  programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme. Pre-sessional courses The University of Glasgow accepts evidence of the required language level from the English for Academic Study Unit Pre-sessional courses. We also consider other BALEAP accredited pre-sessional courses: Career prospects The programme provides a strong foundation for work in the museum, heritage, and education sectors, as well as in media, publishing, and arts administration. Its distinctive object-based study sessions and field trips introduce you to key professionals, whilst the placement option provides 'live' work experience - an essential first step in much arts employment. Our Art History Masters' graduates have secured curatorial posts at institutions including the Palace of Westminster, V&A Museum, Ironbridge Museum, and Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, as well as specialist positions with film and TV companies and auction houses. For those interested in an academic career, the dissertation component provides essential preparation  for  doctoral research.  [-]

Master of Letters in English Literature

Campus Full time Part time August 2017 United Kingdom Glasgow + 1 more

This programme gives you the opportunity to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a wide range of courses led by internationally renowned experts. [+]

English Literature MLitt This programme gives you the opportunity to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a wide range of courses led by internationally renowned experts. A core research training course will introduce you to key skills in postgraduate study, while a flexible degree structure allows you to select from the rich variety of optional courses on offer from the School of Critical Studies and elsewhere in the College of Arts, or even beyond. You can also pursue one of the specialist pathways offered by English Literature, including Fantasy, Medieval and Early Modern, Modernities, and Victorian Literature. The programme ends with an opportunity to write a dissertation on an appropriate English Literature-related topic of your choice. Why this programme The structure of the degree allows you to follow either a bespoke English Literature MLitt programme, constructing your own pathway through a range of different courses, or one of several specialist pathways to suit your interests (see below). You will have access to world class libraries and museums, as well as the extraordinary diversity of cultural, literary and artistic events that makes Glasgow such a vibrant place for postgraduate study. The core research skills programme includes tailored workshops with the University’s archives and world-class Special Collections, as well as providing the academic and technical skills you will need to succeed at postgraduate level in the university and other professional environments. Programme structure There are five different pathways through the MLitt in English Literature at Glasgow: MLitt in English Literature MLitt in English Literature: Fantasy MLitt in English Literature: Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture MLitt in English Literature: Modernities: Literature, Culture, Theory MLitt in English Literature: Victorian Literature  Each pathway will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take our 20 credit core English Literature Research Training Course. You then take five more 20 credit courses, some of which may be compulsory for your chosen pathway, and one 60 credit dissertation. The structure for full-time students is as follows: Semester 1:  English Literature Research Training Course plus two 20 credit courses Semester 2:  Three 20 credit courses Summer:  Dissertation Part-time students take the English Literature Research Training Course and three 20 credit courses in their first year of study, and two 20 credit courses and the dissertation in their second year. Pathways English Literature Build your own English Literature postgraduate degree, drawing on the rich range of optional courses available from English Literature, the School of Critical Studies, and elsewhere in the College of Arts or even beyond. Core courses: English Literature Research Training  English Literature Dissertation Optional courses: Of the five further 20 credit courses you take, two must be from any of those offered within the English Literature MLitt programme. The remaining three 20 credit courses may be either from English Literature or, with the convenor’s permission, from elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond, e.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, the School of Education, etc. English Literature courses may include: The American Counterculture, 1945-75 American Fiction of the 1930s Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline) Decadence and The Modern Embodiments: Literature and Medicine, 1750-1900 Explaining Change: Science and Literary Culture 1830-1880 F Scott Fitzgerald, Edith Wharton and Dialogues of American Literary Modernism Fantasy c. 1780 to 1950 Fantasy 1950 to the present Fictions of Adultery From Medieval to Early Modern Genres and Canons Historic and Critical Approaches to Medieval and Early Modern English Literature The Mind of the Contemporary American Novel The Modern Everyday Modernist Sexualities Modernities 1: Literature, Culture and Theory 1880-1945 Modernities 2: Literature, Culture and Theory 1945 to the present Neo-Victorianism The Novel Now Proust in Theory Victorian Literary History Virginia Woolf Writes Modernity Writing Empire English Literature: Fantasy This programme is designed to give you an overview of fantasy literature in English from the era of revolutions at the end of the eighteenth century to the present. As well as charting the history of modern fantasy, including major children’s fiction where this had a significant impact on the development of adult fantasy literature, the course will introduce you to a range of contemporary critical and theoretical approaches to fantasy and the fantastic. Visiting speakers will be invited, which will give you the opportunity to meet contemporary writers, critics and publishers. There is a Fantasy Film Club and you will also be encouraged to participate reflectively in fantasy-related conventions, conferences and festivals, and to join us on field trips and other events. The Masters in Fantasy is a programme run by enthusiasts for enthusiasts, and we hope this will show. Core courses: Fantasy 1: c. 1780-1950 Fantasy 2: 1950 to the present English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.   English literature: Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture The MLitt in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature and Culture offers students the opportunity to study one of the most vibrant and intellectually challenging periods of literary history. This is an interdisciplinary programme offering a mixture of compulsory and option courses; students may choose options across the range of postgraduate taught courses on offer across the University. You will work with a team of internationally renowned experts with an unparalleled range of medieval and early modern interests, and develop your research skills in manuscripts and print culture by working with the rich manuscript and printed collections held at Glasgow University, the Hunterian, and the Kelvin Hall.  You will also have the option to study a language (i.e. Old English or Latin).  Core courses: From Medieval to Early Modern Historic and Critical Approaches to Medieval and Early Modern English Literature English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  English Literature: Modernities This programme provides the opportunity for advanced study of literary modernism and the avant-garde, and postmodern and contemporary developments in culture and theory. You will investigate the key texts and concepts which shape our understanding of literature and culture across a period of radical change, through an examination of the aesthetic and cultural assumptions of different modern movements; and through an examination of issues in modern writing, particularly those relating to modernity (such as mass culture, revolution, war and empire) and post-modernity (such as simulation, spectacle, performativity and trauma). Throughout, you will study texts in relation to developments in other cultural practices, such as film, theatre and the visual arts. Core courses: Modernities 1: 1890-1945 Modernities 2: 1945 to the present English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  English Literature: Victorian Literature This programme is designed to give you a wide-ranging knowledge of Victorian literature and literary history, introducing you to the period or building on any previous experience of it you may have. You will study a great variety of Victorian writers, genres and forms, and will hone your skills in close reading, historical contextualisation, and use of critical and theoretical sources.  You will also have the opportunity to explore your particular interests in detail, working with staff who are specialists in many aspects of Victorian literature and culture. Glasgow has outstanding resources for the study of Victorian literature including our Special Collections and library. Glasgow is in many ways a Victorian city and you will be working amid some of the most important and beautiful Victorian architecture and landscapes in the UK.  The programme is designed to help you develop research, writing and professional skills which will be transferrable to doctoral study or employment. Previous graduates have gone on to pursue PhDs at Glasgow, Oxford, Cambridge, and other universities, and to careers in teaching, journalism, and consultancy, among other areas. Core courses: Genres and Canons Victorian Literary History English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  Dissertation The two semesters of coursework are followed by one term of supervised work towards a dissertation of up to 15,000 words which you will submit at the beginning of September. The topic normally arises out of the work of the previous two semesters, but the choice is very much open to the student’s own initiative. If you are on a named pathway, then your dissertation topic should fall within the scope of that pathway. If you are on the general pathway, you are welcome to choose a topic from anywhere in the field of English Literature. Your supervisor helps you to develop the proposal and plan the most appropriate reading and methodology. It is also possible to write a dissertation made up of creative writing with a critical component. Normally this possibility is only available to students who have taken the Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline) as one of their options. Entry requirements For entry in 2017 Entry requirements for postgraduate taught programmes are a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject unless otherwise specified. We also require: a sample of written work, about 3,000 words in length. This can be a previous piece of work from an undergraduate degree. The work should be written in English and the content does not have to cover a topic related to this specific programme. a short statement of around 500 words outlining your interest in this programme. two academic references. International students  with  academic  qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. Career prospects Our MLitt programmes provide excellent preparation for PhD studies and an academic career. They also develop key skills sought by many employers, including: the ability to find, select and manage large quantities of information; confident and persuasive oral and written communication; and problem solving through creative and critical thinking. Past Glasgow MLitt graduates have gone on to pursue successful careers in writing, editing, publishing, teaching, the media, heritage and creative industries, and numerous other related professions. [-]

Master of Music in Composition and Creative Practice

Campus Full time August 2017 United Kingdom Glasgow

The Master of Music in Composition and Creative Practice is designed to enable students to develop their compositional practice in a dynamic, rigorous and supportive creative environment. [+]

Composition and Creative Practice MMus The Master of Music in Composition and Creative Practice is designed to enable students to develop their compositional practice in a dynamic, rigorous and supportive creative environment. It aims to provide training in a range of approaches, introducing tools and techniques relevant to today’s music making, and encouraging exploration, innovation and experimentation. Why this programme Students undertake a major portfolio of creative practice with an accompanying critical commentary, preparing them for compositional and musical careers. Students have the opportunity of a placement with a musical or arts organisation, when available, and up-to-date research skills provision in digital arts. We offer the opportunity to have your work performed by a professional ensemble, including an annual showcase of postgraduate work SoundThought. Our facilities include a Concert Hall, three studios, an audio lab, and practice rooms.  Provision of specialist tuition in creative industries and cultural policy at the Centre for Cultural Policy Research. We have a range of modern and historical keyboard instruments including two Steinway Model D grand pianos, an 1840s Broadwood grand piano, a Classical forte-piano, and two harpsichords. Other instruments owned by the School include a selection of percussion instruments, a consort of viols, Baroque strings, recorders, crumhorns and other wind instruments.  The Concert Hall is equipped with a diffusion system for the performance of electroacoustic music.  As a UNESCO City of Music, Glasgow has thriving music, performance and contemporary arts scenes. It is home to numerous orchestras and ensembles including the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and Royal Scottish National Orchestra, making it an outstanding place for compostional study. Programme structure The programme is comprised of three core courses (Composition, Digital and Creative Skills, Individual Creative Practice, and Composition Portfolio) as well as a series of optional courses to allow you to tailor our own bespoke structure. Options will include: Creating with technology Historically Informed Performance Practice Introduction to Popular Music Sonic Arts Aesthetics and Criticism Music, Sound and Screen There will also be opportunities to engage with interdisciplinary study, with courses available from other subjects within the School: Creative Industries and Cultural Policy (Centre for Cultural Policy Research) Festivals (Film and Television Studies) Making Time: performing and thinking temporalities in the creative arts (History of Art) Core teaching will be delivered during semesters 1 and 2. Over the summer months you will complete the core Composition Portfolio, to be submitted at the end of August. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including seminars, one-to-one tutorials, and project work.  Core and optional courses Core courses: Composition, Digital and Creative Skills (40 credits, semester 1) Individual Creative Practice (20 credits, semester 2) Composition Portfolio (60 credits, semester 2/summer) Optional courses: Entry requirements for entry in 2017 A 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (eg GPA of 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject. Applicants should also have some experience of composition and will be expected to supply examples of any prior work. International students  with  academic  qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training): overall score 7.0 no sub-test less than 7.0 or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification: Common equivalent English language qualifications All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme: ibTOEFL: 100; no sub-test less than: Reading: 24 Listening: 24 Speaking: 23 Writing: 27 CAE  (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English):  185; no sub-test less than  185 CPE  (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English): 185; no sub-test less than 185 PTE Academic  (Pearson Test of English, Academic test): 70; no sub-test less than  70 Trinity College London Integrated Skills in English: ISEIII  at  Pass  with  Pass  in all sub-tests For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for degree level  programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme. Pre-sessional courses The University of Glasgow accepts evidence of the required language level from the English for Academic Study Unit Pre-sessional courses. We also consider other BALEAP accredited pre-sessional courses: Career prospects This programme prepares students for careers in composition as well as equipping students more generally with skills necessary for careers in cultural industries (eg. arts administration and management). Additionally, this programme provides the necessary foundation for pursuing further research in composition in the form of a PhD.   [-]

Master of Music in Musicology

Campus Full time August 2017 United Kingdom Glasgow

The MMus in Musicology provides students with intensive study in current trends in Musicology at advanced level. The programme combines a broad base in musicological research, including theoretical and methodological approaches... [+]

Musicology  MMus The MMus in Musicology provides students with intensive study in current trends in Musicology at advanced level. The programme combines a broad base in musicological research, including theoretical and methodological approaches from the historiography, analysis, sociology and cultural and critical study of music, with the possibility of specialising in fields such as Popular Music Studies, Screen Music Studies, Historically Informed Performance Practice (scholarly approaches only) and Sonic Arts Aesthetics and Criticism. Why this Programme Provision of placements in musical or cultural and arts organisations Provision of tuition in digital musicology Provision of specialist tuition in creative industries and cultural policy at the Centre for Cultural Policy Research As a UNESCO City of Music, Glasgow is a unique centre of creative activity in diverse fields, from classical orchestras and ensembles, including BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and Royal Scottish National Orchestra, to legendary venues in popular and traditional music, making it an outstanding place for musicological study. Our facilities include a Concert Hall, three studios, an audio lab and practice rooms We have an excellent collection of modern and historical keyboard instruments including two Steinway Model D grand pianos, an 1840s Broadwood grand piano, a Classical forte-piano, and two harpsichords. Other instruments include a selection of percussion instruments, a consort of viols, Baroque strings, recorders, crumhorns and other wind instruments.   Programme Structure The programme is comprised of four core courses (Research Skills and Digital Musicology, Introduction to Musicology, Current Issues in Musicology and Dissertation in Musicology) to provide students with a firm basis in the current research and methods in musicology. These are complemented by a range of options to allow students to pursue their own specialized interests. Options will include: Historically Informed Performance Practice Introduction to Popular Music Sonic Arts Aesthetics and Criticism Music, Sound and Screen There will also be opportunities to engage with interdisciplinary study, with courses available from other subjects within the School: Creative Industries and Cultural Policy (Centre for Cultural Policy Research) Festivals (Film and Television Studies) Making Time: performing and thinking temporalities in the creative arts (History of Art) Core teaching will be delivered during semesters 1 and 2. Over the summer months you will complete the Dissertation, to be submitted at the end of August. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including seminars and individual supervision. You have the opportunity to take a Placement in a Music or Arts organisation (subject to availability). Core and optional courses Core courses Research Skills and Digital Musicology Introduction to Musicology Current Issues in Musicology Dissertation in Musicology Optional courses: Festivals Historically Informed Performance Practice Seminar Introduction to Popular Music Studies The Contemporary Music Industries Making Time: performing and thinking temporalities in the creative arts Music, Sound and Screen Popular Music Politics Working in Music since 1800 Sonic Art Aesthetics and Criticism Placement Entry Requirements for entry in 2017 Entry requirements for postgraduate taught programmes are a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject unless otherwise specified. International students  with  academic  qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training): overall score 7.0 no sub-test less than 7.0 or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification: Common equivalent English language qualifications All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme: ibTOEFL: 100; no sub-test less than: Reading: 24 Listening: 24 Speaking: 23 Writing: 27 CAE  (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English):  185; no sub-test less than  185 CPE  (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English):  185; no sub-test less than  185 PTE Academic  (Pearson Test of English, Academic test):  70; no sub-test less than  70 Trinity College London Integrated Skills in English:  ISEIII  at  Pass  with  Pass  in all sub-tests For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to  degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for  degree level  programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme. Pre-sessional courses The University of Glasgow accepts evidence of the required language level from the English for Academic Study Unit Pre-sessional courses. We also consider other BALEAP accredited pre-sessional courses Career Prospects This programme prepares students for careers in the music and creative industries as well as related fields, such as the media and broadcasting. Additionally, this programme provides the necessary foundation for pursuing further research in musicology in the form of a PhD. [-]

MSc

MSc/PgDip Ancestral Studies

Campus Full time Part time August 2017 United Kingdom Glasgow

The first of its kind in the world, Ancestral Studies is an innovative new interdisciplinary programme. Uniting teaching across humanities and sciences, Ancestral Studies explores the social and biological contours of identity, allowing you to study across multiple disciplines, create your own curriculum and pursue self-directed unique research. [+]

MSc/PgDip Ancestral Studies The first of its kind in the world, Ancestral Studies is an innovative new interdisciplinary programme. Uniting teaching across humanities and sciences, Ancestral Studies explores the social and biological contours of identity, allowing you to study across multiple disciplines, create your own curriculum and pursue self-directed unique research. Why this programme A truly interdisciplinary degree programme taught collaboratively by world leading academic departments An emphasis on building practical skills through professional masterclasses and skills workshops An immersive learning experience drawing upon the unique Scottish landscape and its rich history   The opportunity to contribute to, and shape, a new academic field of research Programme structure This course can be taken full or part time (at the convener’s discretion).  It is comprised of two core modules and several optional taught modules.  This structure allows you to shape your own curriculum and tailor it to your interests (insofar as staffing and course availability allows).  You will work closely with the convener to shape a meaningful and intellectually cogent programme of study.  Over the summer you will complete a dissertation or professional report dependent upon your interests. Core and Optional Courses Core Courses Research Methods for Ancestral Studies introduces you to key research methodologies and practices drawn from a range of disciplines. You will receive an introduction to specialist and transferable skills such as working with archives and online genealogical resources, visual culture, heritage landscapes, museums and material culture.  Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of primary sources.  Approaches to Ancestral Studies provides a conceptual framework for exploring core themes of the discipline through weekly topics drawn from multiple disciplines.  You will consider questions of identity (genetic and social), examine current trends in family history and heritage research and address questions of past generations and their experiences of place, language and material culture.  You will be exposed to theoretical, critical and practical insights from across the arts, humanities and sciences to explore ancestry, relational identity, intellectual inheritance and memory works. Optional courses Optional courses will be drawn from a range of disciplines and will therefore change on a yearly basis.  You will work with the programme convener to choose a complement of optional courses that will align with your interests.  These courses may be taken from History, Archaeology, Celtic and Gaelic, and more (depending on course offerings in any particular year). Dissertation MSc students will complete a dissertation.  Innovative, cross-disciplinary dissertations are encouraged and will be supervised/co-supervised within the appropriate School/s.   Background and aims Ancestral Studies is a new and emergent area of interdisciplinary research and practice. Concerned with the social, cultural and biological contours of identity, it explores how our ideas of who we are may be influenced by perceived relationships with our ancestors.  Ancestral Studies asks questions of how past generations have engaged with place, landscape, language, text, visual and material culture in order to create a sense of being and belonging.  This unique and ground-breaking programme brings together arts and humanities disciplines with the social and physical sciences.  It aims to generate exciting cutting edge scholarship to examine people’s relationships with their own and others ancestors and the complex contemporary and trans-temporal relevance of these connections in wider socio-political and public contexts throughout the world. Drawing on the outstanding backdrop of Scotland’s ancestral resources, including those of the global Scottish diaspora, the MSc in Ancestral Studies builds on established research strengths and expertise within the University and our partner organisations. This includes nationally significant collections housed in The Hunterian Museum, University Special collections and Archives, as well as the holdings of Glasgow Life and the Scottish Screen Archive. Ancestral Studies balances this local Scottish and UK focus with wider European and global perspectives making it highly relevant to both home and international applicants looking for innovative teaching and learning provision in an exciting and ever-expanding field. Dissertation You will have the option of completing a dissertation or professional report. Innovative, cross-disciplinary dissertations are encouraged and will be supervised/co-supervised within the appropriate School/s.  This will provide good grounding should you choose to pursue further study. Industry links and employability Due to its interdisciplinary nature, Ancestral Studies enjoys links with a range of departments across the University of Glasgow and beyond.  Our Professional Masterclasses and Skills Workshops bring in world leading academics in their fields and external experts.  You will be able to build a wide network of contacts through these connections. Entry Requirements for entry in 2017 Normally a 2:1 undergraduate degree or equivalent in Anthropology, Archaeology, Ancient History, Classics, Celtic and Gaelic, English, Geography, Theology, History or a related subject at the programme convener's discretion. International students with academic qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English Language Requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training) overall score 6.5 no sub-test less than 6.0 or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification: Common equivalent English language qualifications All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme: ibTOEFL: 90; no sub-test less than: Reading: 20 Listening: 19 Speaking: 19 Writing: 23 CAE (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English): 176 overall; no sub-test less than 169 CPE (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English):  176  overall; no sub-test less than 169 PTE Academic (Pearson Test of English, Academic test): 60; no sub-test less than 59 Trinity College London Integrated Skills in English:  ISEII  at  Distinction  with  Distinction  in all sub-tests For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to  degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for  degree level  programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme. Pre-sessional courses The University of Glasgow accepts evidence of the required language level from the English for Academic Study Unit Pre-sessional courses. We also consider other BALEAP accredited pre-sessional courses. Career prospects The combination of practical and theory based learning will equip graduates of Ancestral Studies with a well-balanced and broad set of transferrable skills.  You will have practical research skills in primary and secondary sources (from artefacts to archives), the ability to critically evaluate sources, to debate and formulate your own arguments and theories, and to present your research to your peers. Potential career paths include academic and commercial archaeology, a variety of positions within museums, galleries, archives and libraries, or within the growing Ancestral Tourism sector. [-]

Contact

University of Glasgow

Address G12 8QQ United Kingdom
Website http://www.gla.ac.uk/
Phone +44 141 330 2000