The Open University

Introduction

The OU is the UK's largest university and leads the world in distance learning qualifications in Higher Education.

Why The Open University?

1) Flexibility

  • The OU’s range of learning techniques provide flexible learning like no other university
  • Whether you’re at home, at work or on the move; the OU's innovative teaching methods and materials give you the flexibility you need and bring studying to life in a way never seen before.

2) Support

  • Online support like no other university
  • Consistently ranked in the top 5 for student satisfaction.

3) Career transformation

  • A degree highly valued by employers
  • 80% of the UK's top companies send their staff to The OU

4) Reputation

  • The largest academic institution in the UK
  • With students achieving their potential across the globe
This school offers programs in:
  • English

View MA »

Programmes

This school also offers:

MA

MA in Art History

Online Full time Part time United Kingdom

This MA degree will build on your existing knowledge of art history to equip you with the critical skills necessary for independent research in the field. You begin your studies by exploring core concepts and current concerns of art history. You will then examine critical debates both within the academic discipline of art history and in the 'real world' contexts of heritage, curating and museums. The taught component of the degree provides you with research training which will enable... [+]

MA in Art History This MA degree will build on your existing knowledge of art history to equip you with the critical skills necessary for independent research in the field. You begin your studies by exploring core concepts and current concerns of art history. You will then examine critical debates both within the academic discipline of art history and in the 'real world' contexts of heritage, curating and museums. The taught component of the degree provides you with research training which will enable you to carry out a more substantial piece of independent research on a topic of your choice for the final dissertation module. You need a substantial background in art history at undergraduate level to succeed in obtaining this qualification. Educational aims This taught postgraduate programme in art history (which comprises the postgraduate foundation module (A840), the subject module (A841) and the dissertation module (A847)) will: encourage you to develop your undergraduate knowledge and understanding of art history in higher level and more focused work introduce you to a range of significant scholarly debates among historians of art and architecture provide you with an advanced academic training in research methods, with regard to different media and periods, using both traditional methods and those employing new technologies enable you to make effective use of primary sources, both artistic and archival, in developing and completing a research project. Teaching, learning and assessment methods Knowledge and understanding are gained and developed through the study of published study materials in the postgraduate foundation module (A840) and a subject module (A841). Teaching materials supporting the first two of these include set books, study guides and offprints, supplementary illustrations, assignment booklets, and access to a large number of online resources through the Art History MA website. Learning outcomes are assessed primarily by means of tutor-marked assignments (TMAs). The foundation module also has an examination, which provides you with the opportunity to demonstrate your ability to compare and contrast the different approaches deployed in the set books. In A841, there is a final long assignment, or ‘project’, which allows you to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic of your choosing and prepares you for the dissertation (A847). For the dissertation you will choose a topic relating to the themes studied earlier in the programme, and write this up in 16,000–18,000 words. Tutors provide feedback on draft chapters, but the dissertation itself forms the assessed component of this final module. Career impact Studying art history at postgraduate level will deepen your understanding of art, architecture and visual culture. Through a critical engagement with some of the key theories and approaches developed to interpret and explain works of art from the Renaissance to the present day you will learn to study independently and undertake appropriate research. An MA in Art History will provide you with a range of skills, including visual and textual analysis and critical thinking and writing, which can be successfully transferred to a variety of careers in the professional and educational sectors. Faculty The Arts Faculty was rated by a Times Higher Education survey as one of the best 100 institutions in the world for the study of the arts. Noted for the strength of our interdisciplinary approaches, our scholars of international standing also teach and research a very wide range of topics and themes in specific subject areas. These include art history; classical studies; creative writing; English; history; music; philosophy; and religious studies. The Faculty also has validated partnerships with several important institutions in the UK and other parts of the world. The head of the Faculty is the Dean, Professor David Rowland. Read more about this programme on the Open University website here [-]

MA in Childhood and Youth

Online Full time Part time United Kingdom

This MA course offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of childhood and youth underpinned by a commitment to integrated practice. This qualification is designed for graduates with a background in childhood and youth studies, sociology, health and social care, anthropology, psychology or education. It would suit those already working with children and young people and wish to enhance their knowledge as well as those who wish to enter this field. You study two... [+]

MA in Childhood and Youth This MA course offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of childhood and youth underpinned by a commitment to integrated practice. This qualification is designed for graduates with a background in childhood and youth studies, sociology, health and social care, anthropology, psychology or education. It would suit those already working with children and young people and wish to enhance their knowledge as well as those who wish to enter this field. You study two compulsory 60-credit modules and gain the final 60 credits either from appropriate credit transfer or by taking 60 credits from a choice of optional modules. Educational aims This qualification aims to develop advanced theoretical and integrated practice knowledge about children and young people. It is designed for those working with or for children and young people in a wide range of settings, and for those with a general interest in the study of childhood and youth. The aims and outcomes are to: develop advanced critical analysis skills relevant to integrated practice provide the necessary concepts, theories, knowledge and skills base to understand the lives of children and young people and how this impacts on integrated practice develop appropriate analytical, research and conceptual skills needed to link theory, practice and experience. Teaching, learning and assessment methods The teaching, learning and assessment are linked to the Common Core of Skills and Knowledge for the Children’s Workforce. They are geared towards the development of professional skills through a critical engagement with policy, analysis of organisational structures and reflection on personal practice. Multi-agency working and inter-professional practice has a central focus. Knowledge and understanding is taught through diverse study materials including multi media. You will develop your advanced knowledge and understanding through critical, engagement with material provided in the Readers and reflection facilitated by activities in the online learning guides. You undertake a significant amount of your own enquiry-based learning, appropriate to this level of study, including an extended piece of writing. Summative assessment is through TMAs and EMAs. There is the opportunity, on some parts of the qualification, for collaborative learning through the sharing of your experiences with other students. Face-to-face tutorials, virtual learning communities (in tutor groups) and assignment feedback are designed to build on your academic study skills over the life of the course. You will have opportunities to develop your critical analysis of policy and practice. Key to this will be a developing ability to draw good practice out of theoretical frameworks. You will develop your cognitive skills through critical analysis of diverse study materials, which cover various aspects of children’s experiences at both local and global levels. You will analyse and critique the ideas that influence current practice, analyse recent changes in the organisation of services, especially moves towards greater integration, and explore what it means to be a critical, reflective practitioner. You will also learn, in some parts of the qualification, to compare familiar knowledge and concepts to less familiar experiences of children in other parts of the world. This qualification is designed for people working with children or young people as well as those with a more theoretical interest in the subject and students without access to a practice setting will not be disadvantaged in any way and will be able to use examples from the study materials for assessment tasks. Career impact The MA course will be attractive to professionals working with children and young people who are graduates and seeking to advance academically and professionally, as well as those with a related degree but not currently working with children and young people who are looking to move into the profession, and people considering moving between professions within the sector. It should also be of interest to people in a managerial or supervisory role, to senior members of the workforce, and those seeking to move into senior or managerial positions. This MA in Childhood and Youth will have a strong appeal for students who have completed the BA (Hons) in Childhood and Youth Studies or the BA/BSc (Hons) in Health and Social Care. The content of the qualification will be relevant to graduates working in early years provision, education, social work, nursing, healthcare, youth work, youth justice or the voluntary sector. You should ensure that you check entry requirements for specific professional areas before embarking on study. Case studies in Children and young people's worlds: frameworks for integrated practice (E807) are drawn from worldwide content and therefore this module is very suitable if you are based in any of our four nation states or beyond. The themes covered by Critical practice with children and young people (K802) are relevant to policy and practice worldwide, but you need to be aware that most of the examples in the study materials are drawn from the UK context. Entry requirements To register for this course you will require a bachelors degree (or equivalent) in any discipline relevant to children and young people. Applicants without this qualification, but who have professional experience of at least three years may be eligible for consideration. You should include evidence of this experience in the supplementary information we ask you to provide when you reserve a place. The research project option in E807 is only available if you are a UK resident as you will need to have successfully obtained an Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance check (or equivalent in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland). Students in Scotland will also need to ensure that they meet the requirements of the Protection of Vulnerable Groups Scheme. The criminal record check must be appropriate for the setting in which you intend to carry out your research. The DBS (or equivalent) must bear the same name as given in your post-registration agreement form. You also need permission from your employer to undertake this work. If these conditions cannot be fulfilled then you must choose the E807 literature review option. Please note: it is a legal, rather than an Open University requirement, that you must obtain Enhanced DBS clearance in order to work with children. This is the responsibility of you and your employer and not The Open University. If you are in doubt about your eligibility, or to find out more, you should contact the relevant agency in your country for more information. You will also need to be proficient in English, to an IELTS standard of 6.0. If you are unsure you will be able to take a free English test as part of the registration process. Read more about this programme on the Open University website here [-]

MA in Classical Studies

Online Full time Part time United Kingdom

This MA is designed to help you acquire and develop research skills that will enhance your knowledge of the ancient Graeco-Roman world and prepare you for independent study culminating in a dissertation. It investigates Classical Studies as a multidisciplinary field and brings you into direct contact with texts, artefacts and other surviving evidence from... [+]

MA in Classical Studies This MA is designed to help you acquire and develop research skills that will enhance your knowledge of the ancient Graeco-Roman world and prepare you for independent study culminating in a dissertation. It investigates Classical Studies as a multidisciplinary field and brings you into direct contact with texts, artefacts and other surviving evidence from classical antiquity. This fragmentary evidence is examined from a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives including options in classical archaeology, language and reception, and a subject module based around the body in classical antiquity. Educational aims This taught postgraduate programme in classical studies will: build upon and develop your existing knowledge of, and interest in, the subject of classical studies provide you with an advanced academic training for the practice of classical studies at postgraduate level provide you with experience of independent research and scholarly presentation in classical studies. Teaching, learning and assessment methods You will have the opportunity to acquire all of the above skills which will be taught, learned and assessed concurrently in the course of studying the degree. You will be expected to show an increasingly independent and sophisticated approach as the skills and techniques of advanced study become more familiar, culminating in your dissertation, which will be a substantial and largely independent piece of work. Teaching will be coordinated by your tutor, who will advise you, comment on and mark your assignments, generally provide feedback and help you to acquire the skills of advanced independent study. Communication will be via face-to-face sessions and (more frequently) written, telephone and, if appropriate, IT contact. Learning will be via teaching blocks, which will concentrate on providing the tools for independent study, suggesting lines of investigation, methods of analysis and providing bibiographical assistance. Your acquisition of the appropriate skills, knowledge, etc. will regularly be tested in the assessments. Assessment: you will regularly be required to submit work (tutor-marked assignments) in the form of essays and shorter analyses; for the foundation module you will write five assignments and in addition be required to take a three-hour exam at the end of the module; the subject module consists of four assignments and an ‘examinable component’ (a 3000-word mini-dissertation which will count for 50% of the final mark for that module). The final module will comprise your dissertation (16,000–18,000 words) which will be the culmination of the degree. The assessment exercises are carefully designed to reflect the learning curve of the degree, taken as a whole. Career impact Studying an MA in Classical Studies at the OU is challenging but fun. You will learn about the many different aspects of Greek and Roman worlds - their literature, history, philosophy and material cultures - and the various ways one can approach them through a scholarly tradition that is both fast-moving and long-standing. As well as giving you the opportunity to explore an area of that world which particularly interests you, by means of developing your critical ability and independent thinking the MA in Classical Studies can help benefit your career and even be the first step towards a PhD. Above all, it will lead to a better understanding of where we come from and who we are today. Faculty The Arts Faculty was rated by a Times Higher Education survey as one of the best 100 institutions in the world for the study of the arts. Noted for the strength of our interdisciplinary approaches, our scholars of international standing also teach and research a very wide range of topics and themes in specific subject areas. These include art history; classical studies; creative writing; English; history; music; philosophy; and religious studies. The Faculty also has validated partnerships with several important institutions in the UK and other parts of the world. The head of the Faculty is the Dean, Professor David Rowland. Entry requirements You must hold an honours degree to study for our MA in Classical Studies course. Your degree need not be in the subject area, but you must have the basic skills expected of a graduate in that area and show some knowledge of classical studies. The part 1 module brings you up to date with the latest ideas and approaches in classical studies but does not offer remedial undergraduate training for those who have an inappropriate bachelors degree or inadequate experience. Before you start the MA you must be able to: write clear, concise, grammatically correct and accurately spelt prose read large quantities of text quickly, accurately and critically classify evidence precisely and assess its value and reliability argue logically, consistently and sceptically marshal various sorts of evidence to support a logical argument. If you would like help to assess your preparedness you can contact our Student Registration & Enquiry Service for advice. You must commence your studies towards the MA in Classical Studies with the part 1 module and your final module must be the part 2 module. You must complete this qualification within ten years. You should note that the University’s unique study rule applies to this qualification. This means that you must include at least 60 credits from OU modules that have not been counted in any other OU qualification that has previously been awarded to you. You will also need to be proficient in English, to an IELTS standard of 7.0. If you are unsure you will be able to take a free English test as part of the registration process. Read more about this programme on the Open University website here [-]

Contact

The Open University

Address MK7 6AA, United Kingdom
Website http://www.open.ac.uk/
Phone +44 1908 274066