Part time Master in Arts in the London United Kingdom

Best Part time Master's Degrees in Arts in the London United Kingdom 2017

Arts

A master's degree is a postgraduate academic degree. One must already have an undergraduate degree to apply for a master's program. Most master's degree program would require students to complete a master's thesis or research paper.

The Arts refers to programs that focus on intellectual type topics that are not always as straightforward as science and math. Those wishing to play a creative role in contributing to the community would be interested in the arts.

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom and Britain, is a sovereign state located off the north-western coast of continental Europe.The two most famous (and oldest) universities are Oxford and Cambridge (often referred to as Oxbridge by many Britons) England also has several other world-class institutions, including several in London (notably Imperial College, the London School of Economics, University College London and King's College London, all are part of London University)

London is the capital of UK, the most populous region and where royal family lives. It has the largest concentration of higher education in Europe with 412 thousand students at 43 universities.

Part time Master Degree in Arts in the London in the United Kingdom

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European Master of Professional Photography

Spéos Paris-London Photographic Institute
Campus September 2017 United Kingdom London

The European Master of Professional Photography is designed for students who wish to pursue a career in photography, with a particular emphasis on the business management of the profession. [+]

Part time Master Programs in Arts in the London United Kingdom. This program certified by EABHES – lasting for 14 months in total – comprises three phases: The Professional Photography in one-year Program, from September to May. The Expert Modules, from the end of May to the end of July (cf. below). The planning and elaboration of the Master project, which needs to be submitted to a jury twice: an oral defense of the pre-project allows the students to validate their professional projects’ feasibility and coherence; the final jury’s comments assess the projects’ future implementation. So as to obtain the credits necessary to validate the European Master, students need to have a Bachelor’s degree (180 ECTS, in any subject, not necessarily photography) and need to pass a foreign language test at B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. As for the language tests accepted: TOEIC, TOEFL, IELTS or Cambridge exams for non-native English speakers; for English natives any official language diploma at B2 level in a European language that is not their mother tongue. What are the Expert Modules? The Expert Modules aim at deepening the participants’ previous knowledge and skills in those areas that are most demanded by the professional market. They cover the subjects of business management, image management and publication, advanced studio photography and photo reportage, combining theory and practice. For 8 weeks in total, participants meet up with photography professionals from various domains, who share their experience and know-how from their respective fields of expertise. Students can enroll immediately after completing the Professional Photography in one-year Program, or return to Speos to complement their training in the following year(s). They can enroll for 1 or 2 modules, supervised by professionals within the field of photography. In July, the students equally participate for several days at the Rencontres d’Arles — a major international photography event, during which they visit exhibitions, present their portfolios and start networking. Expert Module: The Photo Business Duration: 5 weeks in two parts Different experts present the business management of all kinds of activities linked to professional photography. The module gives an overview of the photographic professions and the market, copyright legislation, marketing, accounting and financial management within the field of photography. This module also allows participants to deepen their knowledge in the domains of image management and publication, which are presented from the point of view of independent photographers, photo agencies and image banks. Participants also encounter picture researchers/image buyers working for publishing houses and advertising agencies, art directors and photo agents. Throughout the module, they acquire in-depth knowledge about the various possibilities to syndicate their own image stocks. And – last but not least – they get a practical overview of how to efficiently use social media for photographers. Expert Module: Advanced Studio Photography Duration: 3 weeks (takes place at the same time as the Expert Module Advanced Photo Reportage) Participants encounter professional work situations, preparing complex studio sets, focusing on elaborate make-up, hairdressing and accessories. The module also presents a range of expert skills used in commercial photography: shooting with integrated digital post-production, specific retouching (culinary, skin, jewelry etc.), exterior studio shooting. Several meetings will be held at professionals’ workplaces. Expert Module: Advanced Photo Reportage Duration: 3 weeks (takes place at the same time as the Expert Module Advanced Studio) Photojournalism is analyzed from the point of view of agencies, dailies, magazines, and independent photographers. Participants meet professionals working in the fields of image purchase, sales and editing within various kinds of media (print and web). Through these exchanges, they learn how to position them selves and to efficiently prepare their entry into the professional world. Several meetings will be held at professionals’ workplaces. [-]

European Master of Professional Photography 2 year program

Spéos Paris-London Photographic Institute
Campus

The European Master of Professional Photography is designed for students who wish to pursue a career in photography, with a particular emphasis on the business management of the profession. [+]

This program certified by EABHES – lasting for 26 months in total – comprises three phases: The Professional Photography in two-year Program, from September to May (semester 1 and 2) then from September to May (semester 3 and 4). The Expert Modules, from the end of May to the end of July (cf. below). The planning and elaboration of the Master project, which needs to be submitted to a jury twice: an oral defense of the pre-project allows the students to validate their professional projects’ feasibility and coherence; the final jury’s comments assess the projects’ future implementation. So as to obtain the credits necessary to validate the European Master, students need to have a Bachelor’s degree (180 ECTS, in any subject, not necessarily photography) and need to pass a foreign language test at B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. As for the language tests accepted: TOEIC, TOEFL, IELTS or Cambridge exams for non-native English speakers; for English natives any official language diploma at B2 level in a European language that is not their mother tongue. What are the Expert Modules? The Expert Modules aim at deepening the participants’ previous knowledge and skills in those areas that are most demanded by the professional market. They cover the subjects of business management, image management and publication, advanced studio photography and photo reportage, combining theory and practice. For 8 weeks in total, participants meet up with photography professionals from various domains, who share their experience and know-how from their respective fields of expertise. Students can enroll immediately after completing the The Professional Photography in two-year Program, or return to Speos to complement their training in the following year(s). They can enroll for 1 or 2 modules, supervised by professionals within the field of photography. In July, the students equally participate for several days at the Rencontres d’Arles — a major international photography event, during which they visit exhibitions, present their portfolios and start networking. Expert Module: The Photo Business Expert Module: Advanced Studio Photography Expert Module: Advanced Photo Reportage [-]

Master Governing the Large Metropolis

Sciences Po
Campus

The Master's programme Governing the Large Metropolis aims to prepare graduates for work on public policy issues in a variety of large metropolises beyond Europe, in relation to different types of organizations and agencies. [+]

Part time Master Programs in Arts in the London United Kingdom. Master Governing the Large Metropolis Programme objectives The Master's programme Governing the Large Metropolis aims to prepare graduates for work on public policy issues in a variety of large metropolises beyond Europe, in relation to different types of organizations and agencies. The world cities and urban sprawl of both the global North and the global South face massive public policy and governance challenges. The scale and speed of urbanization raise a plethora of issues, which are all covered in the programme. These include: economic development, poverty and slums, housing, health, technological and social innovation, the management of risk, infrastructure, water and waste disposal, changing labour markets, sustainable development, democratic participation. Governing populations divided and organized by class, income, religion, ethnic origin, mobility and/or gender has become even more difficult in a globalizing world where opportunities for mobility, participation in overlapping networks, interdependence and the scale of large urban regions make classic territorial conceptions of government and public policies partly obsolete. Students receive rigorous methodological training, experience from international professionals and exposure to high level academic content. The programme is taught entirely in English with a great emphasis on issues of comparative study. No ready made recipes are provided, and no simple fairy stories on the so called "best practices of good governance": the programme trains the students with a strong critical approach and management skills so as to be competent for project accounting and decision making to implement urban policy in critical environments. Systematic relations are built with urban professionals and research groups, including cities such as Bogotà, Lima, Mexico, Rio, Sao Paulo, Lagos, Beijing, Los Angeles, Chicago, New York, Istanbul, Cairo, New Delhi, Shanghai, Tokyo and Johannesburg. Going beyond geography, development studies and physical planning, the Master's programme aims at training young professionals who will take charge of public policy design and implementation in the governance of large cities in the future. Main orientations and specific features The two-year programme comprises a mix of sound interdisciplinary theoretical courses, case studies, methods and professional training: Theoretical training focuses on public policy, sociology, governance, law, economics, demography, risk and globalization, centering on issues such as housing, migration, food security, utilities, climate change, informal economy, local finance, conflict management, transports, cultural policies, and the digital city; Professional training is provided in the first year through a group project (capstone) commissioned by a private or public organization, which involves doing applied research in the urban field. Students work 1.5 days a week for six months with a professional tutor. Students also take advantage of a planned study trip to a large urban center (past cities include Cairo, Istanbul, Casablanca/Tangier/Rabat). Case studies and workshops are taught by professionals; Solid methodological training in advanced quantitative and qualitative analysis, network analysis, map work, ecological data mining, and GIS training; In the second semester, regional training focuses on specific area of expertise, with historical insights on urban change. Students have to chose among African Metropolis, Arab and Mediterranean Metropolis, Asian Metropolis, Latin American Metropolis, and North American Metropolis; In the final semester, students will either undertake an internship of at least 14 weeks in a large metropolis or will spend the semester within a partner university, where they will prepare a research thesis (for those envisaging a PhD). During the whole duration of the programme, students are assisted in their course and professional orientation through a regular vocational statement exercise. The programme works in collaboration with other programmes from the Urban School. It also has a close link with research conducted at Sciences Po, notably with the research program "Cities are back in town". Career opportunities Students will have opportunities to work in the following organisations: UN organisations; Environment, health, security and food organisations; Global utility firms (water, transport, waste disposals, energy); NGO's in different sectors (democratic governance, environment, housing, development, culture…); Urban planning agencies, economic development agencies, urban political organisations; Networks of cities (C40, ICLEI etc..); Urban and regional governments; Private foundations and think tanks; Private developers and international consultants in the large metropolis. [-]

Master in Political Arts (SPEAP)

Sciences Po
Campus

The Experimental Programme in Political Arts (SPEAP) is a one-year Master's programme at the School of Public Affairs for mid-career professionals with at least 4 years of professional experience. [+]

Experimental Programme in Political Arts (SPEAP) What is SPEAP? The Experimental Programme in Political Arts (SPEAP) is a one-year Master's programme at the School of Public Affairs for mid-career professionals with at least 4 years of professional experience. This full-time programme brings together architects, designers, academics, public servants, managers, researchers, administrators, activists and curators who wish to enhance their skills, develop inventive tools and give a new momentum to their career. This multidisciplinary programme is driven by key notions of experimentation, inquiry and innovation that explore the points of articulation and connection between scientific, artistic, and political fields. Young professionals from a wide variety of backgrounds will confront concrete societal and political issues through a range of classes and pedagogical formats that combine scientific and artistic methods. The programme's conceptual framework is based on the fields of social sciences and humanities (including philosophy, sociology, history and science). The programme combines theoretical teaching with pragmatic tools and concepts, through group work and workshops that are comprised of exercises in which participants co-develop and test practical solutions to real-world issues. The Sciences Po Medialab, a leading-edge research hub, offers participants access to a variety of professionalizing tools, including controversy mapping, visual network analysis and design methods. This digital toolkit is used to explore and analyse social science methods and political arts questions, allowing participants to share their knowledge and skills, and also incorporate the use of films, performances, and digital media. Students will also benefit from the core curriculum of the School of Public Affairs. According to their professional trajectory and objectives, students can choose to develop skills in project management within the scope of public policy and the various policy streams offered within the School. Graduates can therefore take the programme as an opportunity to consider new career options as managers in cultural bodies and other major public domains. Programme one core course, 4 h per week: « Performances and Political Arts » (Bruno Latour, Jean-Michel Frodon and Frédérique Aït-Touati) one workshop, 4 h per week (practical exercises, commissions) one common core curriculum course three elective courses to choose among the courses of the School of Public Affairs, according to the professional objectives of the student three intensive weeks to develop practical skills and methods Admissions Twenty students are selected each year, upon examination of the application materials (presentation of work related to the admission theme) and secondly upon an oral interview. Application materials a CV a motivation letter two academic or professional references an indication of language proficiency: English and French excerpts of applicant's work. All supports are accepted but must remain synthetic: 20 pages maximum for images and text, 10 minutes maximum for sound or video. one proposal on the theme. The work submitted by the applicant may be artistic or scientific formats. All forms will be accepted but must remain synthetic: 20 pages maximum for images and text, 10 minutes maximum for sound or video. The theme for 2017 will be announced in Januray. The theme for 2016 was: "The State is always to be reinvented", John Dewey. The calendar will be updated by the end of 2016. postal address: SPEAP - Ecole d'Affaires Publiques de Sciences Po, 27 rue Saint-Guillaume, 75337 Paris cedex 07 – France Selection criteria The main selection criteria are as follows: recognized excellence in the candidate's domain quality, originality motivation and professional project ability to adapt and evolve in an international, multicultural environment flexibility, openness and curiosity sensitivity to creation and the sciences in the broadest sense taste for experimentation and collective work knowledge of English is required knowledge of French is required Tuition and Financial Aid Tuition for the entire programme is set at 13 800€. Sciences Po awards scholarships to a select number of students, in the form of tuition reduction. These tuition reductions range from 10% to over 50%. Calendar SPEAP is a full-time one-year programme. It starts late August, and ends in May. Admission schedule The calendar will be updated by the end of 2016. Admissions will open in early 2017. [-]

(MArch) Master of Architecture (RIBA pt II)

University of Westminster - Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment
Campus September 2017 United Kingdom London

The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. The emphasis of the course is on innovative design work, and on developing a caring and critical approach to the study and practice of architecture. [+]

Part time Master Programs in Arts in the London United Kingdom. The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. The emphasis of the course is on innovative design work, and on developing a caring and critical approach to the study and practice of architecture. The course fosters diversity of choice, interpretation and approach, whether in design projects or more academic research. The former focuses on sophisticated design programmes (in formal, technical, professional or urban terms) that demand rigour and self-criticism. The latter focuses on your major dissertation, an extended piece of specialised research into architecture and its historical or theoretical contexts. The course has three main objectives: to develop your design ability through project-based experimentation; to present an evaluation and critique of your coursework within a broad cultural context, and in light of technical, economic and legal constraints; and to promote the articulate explanation and representation of quality and value in design projects. Core modules DESIGN PROJECT 1 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO) This single design project, or series of linked design projects, is individual to each elective Design Studio, and is run in parallel with the Year 2 Design Studio. You choose your Design Studio following presentations by all the Design Studio tutors at the beginning of the academic year; each Design Studio offers a new project every year. Projects lead from exploratory research to the development of an individual brief, and a design proposal which you develop for assessment at the end of Semester One. DIGITAL REPRESENTATION This module focuses on digital media technology and computer-based strategies, including the principles of 2D and 3D computer drawing, modelling, rendering, animation and digital fabrication techniques. The module aims to extend your practical and theoretical understanding of advanced digital media, as well as to enhance your existing computing knowledge and skills - so assessment is on a 'value-added' basis. PROFESSIONAL STUDIES This module draws on your work experience and introduces statutory, professional and management concepts related to the 'professional' development of your coursework. It asks you to reflect on your prior experience and personal development, and to identify areas for future investigation. The module introduces you to the role of the architect in the construction industry (including development and procurement issues), and to the professional, managerial and legal constraints that influence the work of the architect in practice. DESIGN PROJECT 2 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO) Commonly, though not exclusively, the theme or context of Design Project 2 involves developing or testing aspects of the Design Project 1 through further research or exploratory projects. This module, however, places greater emphasis on the detailed resolution of the individual design proposal, often at a larger scale, and deals more explicitly with the issues of programme, materiality, technology and environmental impact. The module is run in parallel with the Year 2 Design Studio. HISTORY AND THEORY This module consists of specialist seminar study and a series of wider module-wide lectures, and begins a year-long study of architectural history and theory which culminates with your dissertation submission in Year 2. Following presentations by all the seminar group leaders at the beginning of the semester, you choose a seminar group with its own particular theme and programme of study. Based on this, you select an individual area of research, and develop it through writing and a presentation; you also prepare an abstract for your Dissertation. TECHNICAL STUDIES IN PRACTICE This module requires you, individually or within a group, to carry out research into different approaches to, and kinds of, technology and environmental design. You will need to look at the wider cultural issues involved, but more especially at issues of sustainability in design. This is expected to inform your Design Studio project work. DISSERTATION The Dissertation is the primary focus of Architectural History and Theory teaching, and the main written component of the course. Building on your abstract, you research into primary and secondary sources, define and refine a methodology, produce a draft synopsis, and, finally, complete a 10,000-word dissertation with footnotes, bibliography and illustrations. If you explore another mode of study, such as making a film or designing a website, you will still need to meet a lower word limit of 6,000 words. MAIN DESIGN PROJECT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO) As with Design Studio 1, this is individual to each elective Design Studio, and you choose your Design Studio following presentations by all the Design Studio tutors at the beginning of the academic year. The module is integrated with the subsequent Design Development module, and these two modules usually create a single overarching project for the final academic year. The modules is run in parallel with the Year 1 Design Studio, however, Year 2 students are expected to pursue, and resolve, a more ambitious and sophisticated thesis. APPLIED TECHNICAL STUDIES In this module you complete an applied technical study concurrent with the progression of your main Design Studio project. This integrated report explains and deepens the environmental, structural and constructional strategies inherent to your design thinking and your project. DESIGN DEVELOPMENT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO) This module follows on from the Main Design Project, and asks you to elaborate, test, adapt and develop your design project proposal to produce a well-resolved architectural design. This module encourages you to communicate your ideas, research work and design proposals in a range of media at an advanced level. You also integrate your presentation with your work in the Strategic Report and Applied Technical Studies modules. The module is run in parallel with the Year 1 Design Studio. STRATEGIC REPORT This module is a substantial report that is integrated with your main Design Studio project, and the Applied Technical Studies modules. The report focuses on exploring and explaining the critical project decisions made as part of the design process. The module introduces you to various approaches to the report - methodologies, techniques, selected building precedents - through seminars and Design Studio group tutorials. Course-specific entry requirements You are required to have an undergraduate degree in Architecture, or similar, with a high level of achievement, which will normally be validated by the RIBA for Part 1/prescribed by the ARB for Part 1. You will usually have one year's (post-degree) professional experience. At interview, you should present your academic portfolio together with examples of work undertaken during professional training, and any relevant contextual material. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0, with a minumum of 6.5 in all components. Associated careers Most students who complete the Architecture MArch (Part 2) are subsequently employed in architectural offices, and become registered architects after taking the Part 3 exam. Others progress to take further Masters or PhD degrees, and then go into research and/or teaching. [-]

MArch Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part Part II)

University of Westminster - Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment
Campus September 2017 United Kingdom London

The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. The emphasis of the course is on innovative design work, and on developing a caring and critical approach to the study and practice of architecture. [+]

The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. The emphasis of the course is on innovative design work, and on developing a caring and critical approach to the study and practice of architecture. The course fosters diversity of choice, interpretation and approach, whether in design projects or more academic research. The former focuses on sophisticated design programmes (in formal, technical, professional or urban terms) that demand rigour and self-criticism. The latter focuses on your major dissertation, an extended piece of specialised research into architecture and its historical or theoretical contexts. The course has three main objectives: to develop your design ability through project-based experimentation; to present an evaluation and critique of your coursework within a broad cultural context, and in light of technical, economic and legal constraints; and to promote the articulate explanation and representation of quality and value in design projects. Core modules DESIGN PROJECT 1 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO) This single design project, or series of linked design projects, is individual to each elective Design Studio, and is run in parallel with the Year 2 Design Studio. You choose your Design Studio following presentations by all the Design Studio tutors at the beginning of the academic year; each Design Studio offers a new project every year. Projects lead from exploratory research to the development of an individual brief, and a design proposal which you develop for assessment at the end of Semester One. DIGITAL REPRESENTATION This module focuses on digital media technology and computer-based strategies, including the principles of 2D and 3D computer drawing, modelling, rendering, animation and digital fabrication techniques. The module aims to extend your practical and theoretical understanding of advanced digital media, as well as to enhance your existing computing knowledge and skills - so assessment is on a 'value-added' basis. PROFESSIONAL STUDIES This module draws on your work experience and introduces statutory, professional and management concepts related to the 'professional' development of your coursework. It asks you to reflect on your prior experience and personal development, and to identify areas for future investigation. The module introduces you to the role of the architect in the construction industry (including development and procurement issues), and to the professional, managerial and legal constraints that influence the work of the architect in practice. DESIGN PROJECT 2 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO) Commonly, though not exclusively, the theme or context of Design Project 2 involves developing or testing aspects of the Design Project 1 through further research or exploratory projects. This module, however, places greater emphasis on the detailed resolution of the individual design proposal, often at a larger scale, and deals more explicitly with the issues of programme, materiality, technology and environmental impact. The module is run in parallel with the Year 2 Design Studio. HISTORY AND THEORY This module consists of specialist seminar study and a series of wider module-wide lectures, and begins a year-long study of architectural history and theory which culminates with your dissertation submission in Year 2. Following presentations by all the seminar group leaders at the beginning of the semester, you choose a seminar group with its own particular theme and programme of study. Based on this, you select an individual area of research, and develop it through writing and a presentation; you also prepare an abstract for your Dissertation. TECHNICAL STUDIES IN PRACTICE This module requires you, individually or within a group, to carry out research into different approaches to, and kinds of, technology and environmental design. You will need to look at the wider cultural issues involved, but more especially at issues of sustainability in design. This is expected to inform your Design Studio project work. DISSERTATION The Dissertation is the primary focus of Architectural History and Theory teaching, and the main written component of the course. Building on your abstract, you research into primary and secondary sources, define and refine a methodology, produce a draft synopsis, and, finally, complete a 10,000-word dissertation with footnotes, bibliography and illustrations. If you explore another mode of study, such as making a film or designing a website, you will still need to meet a lower word limit of 6,000 words. MAIN DESIGN PROJECT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO) As with Design Studio 1, this is individual to each elective Design Studio, and you choose your Design Studio following presentations by all the Design Studio tutors at the beginning of the academic year. The module is integrated with the subsequent Design Development module, and these two modules usually create a single overarching project for the final academic year. The modules is run in parallel with the Year 1 Design Studio, however, Year 2 students are expected to pursue, and resolve, a more ambitious and sophisticated thesis. APPLIED TECHNICAL STUDIES In this module you complete an applied technical study concurrent with the progression of your main Design Studio project. This integrated report explains and deepens the environmental, structural and constructional strategies inherent to your design thinking and your project. DESIGN DEVELOPMENT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO) This module follows on from the Main Design Project, and asks you to elaborate, test, adapt and develop your design project proposal to produce a well-resolved architectural design. This module encourages you to communicate your ideas, research work and design proposals in a range of media at an advanced level. You also integrate your presentation with your work in the Strategic Report and Applied Technical Studies modules. The module is run in parallel with the Year 1 Design Studio. STRATEGIC REPORT This module is a substantial report that is integrated with your main Design Studio project, and the Applied Technical Studies modules. The report focuses on exploring and explaining the critical project decisions made as part of the design process. The module introduces you to various approaches to the report - methodologies, techniques, selected building precedents - through seminars and Design Studio group tutorials. Course-specific entry requirements You are required to have an undergraduate degree in Architecture, or similar, with a high level of achievement, which will normally be validated by the RIBA for Part 1/prescribed by the ARB for Part 1. You will usually have one year's (post-degree) professional experience. At interview, you should present your academic portfolio together with examples of work undertaken during professional training, and any relevant contextual material. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0, with a minumum of 6.5 in all components. Associated careers Most students who complete the Architecture MArch (Part 2) are subsequently employed in architectural offices, and become registered architects after taking the Part 3 exam. Others progress to take further Masters or PhD degrees, and then go into research and/or teaching. [-]

MMus Performance

SOAS University of London
Campus Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London

This programme is designed for students who wish to specialise in performance while studying for an academic degree. Students have the unique opportunity to develop performance in specific Asian and African music traditions to professional standard. [+]

Part time Master Programs in Arts in the London United Kingdom. MMus Performance Duration: Full time: 1 calendar year. Part time: 2/3 calendar years. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent), usually in Music Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This programme is designed for students who wish to specialise in performance while studying for an academic degree. Students have the unique opportunity to develop performance in specific Asian and African music traditions to professional standard. They acquire expert knowledge about performance and the geographical or stylistic region of their performance specialism. The performance component of the programme, in which students choose an Asian or African performance tradition, includes practice-based research. Students study the music of a particular region alongside performance theory training. Through a range of optional courses they pursue additional interests as well. The programme is particularly suited to performing musicians who wish to deepen and broaden their theoretical perspectives and musical horizons. Many former students have found their performance careers enhanced, while others have gone on to engage with their performance from more critical, academic perspectives, including MPhil/PhD research. Structure Students are required to take 4 units (one unit courses being two-terms in duration, while half unit courses are taught in one term only). In addition to these formal elements, students may attend postgraduate and public seminars and may also participate in performance ensemble classes and other activities. Course Detail The formal elements of the MMus Performance programme are: Performance Theory (half unit) The compulsory core course; part-time students must normally take this in year 1. Performance (full unit) Performance lessons in a vocal or instrumental tradition from their selected region. Examined by a public recital in May-June (for part-time students: in May-June of year 1) and by coursework. Performance as Research (full unit) Further study of the same tradition as under 3 above, but with a more specific research focus. Examined by a public recital in September (for part-time students: in September of the final year) and by coursework. Select courses to the value of 67.5 credits from List A,B and/or C, including at least one course from List A. List A: Area Courses Aspects of Music and Religion in South East Asia - 15PMUH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Atlantic Africa: (P)Layers of Mediation in African Popular Music (PG) - 15PMUC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Central Asian Music - 15PMUH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Ethnicity, Religion and Gender in Middle Eastern Musical cultures - 15PMUH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian vocal music: Styles and histories - 15PMUH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Klezmer Music: Roots and Revival - 15PMUH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music in Selected Regions of Africa: Contexts and Structures - 15PMUC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Music, Place and Politics in Cuba - 15PMUH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Popular and Fusion Music in South East Asia (PG) - 15PMUH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Sacred Sound in South Asia - 15PMUH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 List B: Additional Courses Analysing World Music: Transcription & Analysis in Ethnomusicology - 15PMUH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Composition - 15PMUH013 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Gender and Music (MMus) - 15PMUH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 The Music Business (Masters) - 15PMUH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 List C: Courses Taught at King's College Students may also take approved courses from Kings College Department of Music (see this link for available options: //www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/music/study/handbook/programmes/pgt/mods15-16.aspx) Special assessment rules apply for SOAS students to bring the credit rating up to 22.5 – please check with course tutors at King’s for requirements. Advanced Opera Study - (22.5 Unit) Advanced Studies in Musical Analysis & Criticism: Beethoven's Late Works - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Biography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Historiography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Performance, Gesture and Meaning - (22.5 Unit) Post-tonal Music and Composition Theory - (22.5 Unit) Theories of Modernism and the Avant-Garde - (22.5 Unit) 21st-Century Bach - (22.5 Unit) Teaching & Learning The Department of Music has been highly rated for teaching and research in all recent assessment exercises, and is regularly ranked amongst the top Music departments in the UK in Good University Guides. Music students have access to the large Main Library of the School which holds numerous books, journals and recordings relevant to the study of ethnomusicology and world music, as well as the nearby British Library Sound Archive and other London libraries and museums. The SOAS Library holds copies of standard reference works on music, such as the current edition of the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. The Grove dictionary and the RILM database can also be accessed on line from computer terminals in the Library or elsewhere on the SOAS network. Listening facilities are provided in the Library, and most CDs are available on short loan. Among special items in the Department’s collections are: field recordings, films and slides a large working collection of musical instruments from Asia and Africa extensive staff collections relating to specific research interests Performance The Convenor will communicate by email and through meetings with all students taking Performance or Performance as Research, and must be approached for official approval of your choice of performance tradition and teacher. Such approval is signalled by the Convenor’s signature on the Department’s standard “Performance study application form”, available from the Faculty office and online. No lessons should be taken until this form has been signed. The staff member most closely related to your chosen tradition acts as a Sub-convenor and should be your first point of contact for any matters pertaining to the specific tradition you are studying. Convenor and Sub-convenor will liaise as necessary. The Department will not support training in “Western” vocal or instrumental traditions. Subsidy towards the cost of lessons: The Department will pay for approved external tuition, up to a maximum amount agreed at the start of the session (currently £500 for Performance and £300 for Performance as Research). Please be aware that the cost of regular performance lessons might exceed these amounts; any excess must be paid by the student. Claims for reimbursement must be submitted using the standard Music Performance Lesson Reimbursement Form available from the convenor, accompanied by a signed receipt or invoice from the teacher. Claims cannot be accepted after the examination. The student is also responsible for arranging regular lesson times, negotiating lesson fees, and obtaining access to any necessary instrument. You will receive an Information Sheet for External Teachers, describing payment procedures, the teacher’s obligations, and so forth; you should read through this together with your teacher at the earliest opportunity. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Music Performance from SOAS gives students improved competency in performance and a better understanding of global music which will enable them to continue in the field of research or engage in related work. Equally, they develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and creative capacities including interpersonal skills, communication skills, focus, team work, passion and dedication. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Specific Graduate Destinations Helen Evans is an Education Officer for the Asian Music Circuit. Jo Shaw (née Hoskin) was gamelan co-ordinator for the London Symphony Orchestra’s educational Discovery programme, but is moving on to set up her own Indonesian music and dance programme in southwest England. Sarah Hall has worked as India regional director for two different charities. Jon Kertzer directed the Smithsonian Global Sound Network and is now working on the business development of the Microsoft MSN Music Service. Hélène Rammant is a Producer for BBC Radio 3, specialising in World Music. Megan Jones is a Producer in the Music Department of BBC Cymru Wales. Katie Vickers (née Hall) is a music Marketing Officer for the South Bank Centre, London. Sally Pomme Clayton is a storyteller and lecturer on world oral traditions at Middlesex University. Rachel Ireland first served as executive assistant at the Great Britain-Sasakawa Foundation and is now Executive Officer, Operations for the London-based charity Youth Music. Chua Siew Ling is a music officer in the Ministry of Education in Singapore. Louise Taylor was an administrator for Folkworks at the Sage Gateshead music centre, and has now moved on to a related community post in Newcastle. Elie Gussman is an Education Officer for the Asian Music Circuit. London. Nobuko Miyazaki is an Education Officer for the Asian Music Circuit, London. Many other MMus graduates continue on to do MPhil/PhD research. Others return, enhanced, to their previous careers. For example, Belinda Sykes is Professor of Medieval Song at Trinity College of Music and singer and director of the Arabic and European medieval song ensemble Joglaresa. A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a great place to study Ethnomusicology. It has the flavour of the world spread through the music made by the students, lecturers and guests." Marina Di Giorgi [-]

MMus Ethnomusicology

SOAS University of London
Campus Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London

This programme is tailored for musicians and musicologists, anthropologists, teachers and composers, as well as those dedicated to developing an in-depth knowledge of a specific music tradition. [+]

MMus Ethnomusicology Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent), usually in Music Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Theoretical and practical grounding in the discipline of ethnomusicology, as well as the opportunity to develop performance and ethnographic skills, regional expertise, and a deeper understanding of global music – just some of what you can expect to develop on the MMus Ethnomusicology. This programme is tailored for musicians and musicologists, anthropologists, teachers and composers, as well as those dedicated to developing an in-depth knowledge of a specific music tradition. You will study with the largest and most influential team of ethnomusicologists in the UK, who are experts in the musical traditions of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Central Asia and the Jewish world. You will be part of a thriving culture of performance, research and active engagement with music around the globe. The programme will suit those looking for a springboard into further research or employment in a range of music-related fields including journalism, industry, NGOs and education, and often serves as a conversion route for those trained predominantly in western music traditions. Structure The MMus programme involves taking three courses and writing a 11,000-word dissertation. In addition to these formal elements, students are expected to attend regular postgraduate and public seminars and may also participate in performance ensemble classes and other activities. Course Detail The four formal elements of the MMus Ethnomusicology programme are: The full unit core course Ethnomusicology in Practice. A broad introduction to the major themes of ethnomusicological study. Taught as a weekly two-hour lecture/seminar with additional tutorials. Part-time students must take this in their first year. The Dissertation in Music. A special study 11,000 words in length on a topic agreed with the candidate's supervisor. This will normally relate to the "major region" chosen below, but may instead deal with a theoretical or comparative topic. Part-time students normally take this in their final year. Select courses to the value of 90 credits from List A,B,C and/or D,including at least one course from list A. List A: Area Courses Atlantic Africa: (P)Layers of Mediation in African Popular Music (PG) - 15PMUC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Aspects of Music and Religion in South East Asia - 15PMUH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Central Asian Music - 15PMUH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Ethnicity, Religion and Gender in Middle Eastern Musical cultures - 15PMUH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian vocal music: Styles and histories - 15PMUH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Klezmer Music: Roots and Revival - 15PMUH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music in Selected Regions of Africa: Contexts and Structures - 15PMUC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Music, Place and Politics in Cuba - 15PMUH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Popular and Fusion Music in South East Asia (PG) - 15PMUH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Sacred Sound in South Asia - 15PMUH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 List B: Additional Music Courses African and Asian Cultures in Britain - 15PANH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Analysing World Music: Transcription & Analysis in Ethnomusicology - 15PMUH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Composition - 15PMUH013 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Digital traditional broadcasting communication - 15PMSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender and Music (MMus) - 15PMUH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music and Healing - 15PMUH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music in Development - 15PMUC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Performance - 15PMUC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Sound Recording and Production - 15PMSH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Music Business (Masters) - 15PMUH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 List C: Courses at King's College Students may also take up to a maximum of 45 credit units from King's College Department of Music (see this link for available options: https: //www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/music/study/handbook/programmes/pgt/mods15-16.aspx) . Special assessment rules apply for SOAS students taking King’s College courses to bring the credit rating of each course up to 45 credits. Please check with course tutors at King’s for specific requirements. Course choices will vary each year, at the time of completing this document, the following courses are available: Advanced Opera Study - (22.5 Unit) Advanced Studies in Musical Analysis & Criticism: Beethoven's Late Works - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Biography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Historiography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Performance, Gesture and Meaning - (22.5 Unit) Post-tonal Music and Composition Theory - (22.5 Unit) Theories of Modernism and the Avant-Garde - (22.5 Unit) 21st-Century Bach - (22.5 Unit) List D: Courses at SOAS from other departments in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities or MA Area Studies courses (including languages) in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. Course choices are subject to the agreement of both the course convenor and the MMus Ethnomusicology convenor. Courses will normally relate to the same geographical region chosen from List A course(s). Teaching & Learning The Department of Music has been highly rated for teaching and research in all recent assessment exercises, and is regularly ranked amongst the top Music departments in the UK in Good University Guides. Music students have access to the large Main Library of the School which holds numerous books, journals and recordings relevant to the study of ethnomusicology and world music, as well as the nearby British Library Sound Archive and other London libraries and museums. The SOAS Library holds copies of standard reference works on music, such as the current edition of the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. The Grove dictionary and the RILM database can also be accessed on line from computer terminals in the Library or elsewhere on the SOAS network. Listening facilities are provided in the Library, and most CDs are available on short loan. Among special items in the Department’s collections are: field recordings, films and slides a large working collection of musical instruments from Asia and Africa extensive staff collections relating to specific research interests Destinations A postgraduate degree in Ethnomusicology from SOAS gives students greater intercultural awareness, improved competency in performance and a better understanding of global music which will enable them to continue in the field of research or engage in related work. Equally, they develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and creative capacities including interpersonal skills, communication skills, focus, team work, passion and dedication. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Internet Advertising Board Marie Stopes International Association of Culture & World Music School of Traditional & Popular Music Vortex Jazz Club Sony/EMI S24 Film British Library Grant & Cutler British Library UK Government Warner Music Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Production Assistant Sound Archive assistant Bookseller Solicitor Finance Manager Manager of Musical Association Junior Research Executive Project support officer Policy adviser Playworker Library Assistant Local Councillor A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a great place to study Ethnomusicology. It has the flavour of the world spread through the music made by the students, lecturers and guests." Marina Di Giorgi [-]

Advanced Urban Design

Higher School of Economics
Campus

The programme is focusing on urbanization in developing countries where urban growth is the most significant now. The programme is aimed at the next generation of Urban Designers that will be able to work effectively in highly volatile conditions of the cities in Russia and rest of the world. [+]

Part time Master Programs in Arts in the London United Kingdom. The international Masters degree programme in Urban Design is a joint programme of the Graduate School of Urbanism of the HSE University Russia and the Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design. The educational process is built on the ‘research-based design’ methodology that involves tutors from the best world universities and practitioners of leading international firms. The programme is focusing on urbanization in developing countries where urban growth is the most significant now. The programme is aimed at the next generation of Urban Designers that will be able to work effectively in highly volatile conditions of the cities in Russia and rest of the world. The programme is aimed at the next generation of Urban Designers, combining the best of the Russian Academia and the cutting-edge experimental project-based education. It will offer: Strong emphasis on critical, conceptual, and design thinking Working environment of an interdisciplinary 'lab' for both designers and analytics Pioneering “Research-Based Design” methodology created and tested at the Strelka Institute Unique courses tailored for the new demands of contemporary urban theory and the next practices Project modules with innovative briefs and real clients in Russia and South Africa Team of tutors from the best world universities and practitioners of leading international firms Access to the vast network of experts and clients of both the Strelka Institute and the HSE University Russia [-]

Master in Internet Technology and Architecture (ITA)

EIT Digital Master School
Campus September 2017 United Kingdom London

The ITA master is a new European two-year master programme within the EIT Digital Master School “ICT Innovation”. The aim of the EIT (European Institute of Innovation and Technology) is to breed a new generation of technology-skill [+]

The ITA master is a new European two-year master programme within the EIT Digital Master School “ICT Innovation”. The aim of the EIT (European Institute of Innovation and Technology) is to breed a new generation of technology-skilled entrepreneurs by enhancing high-profile technology education with a strong business orientation. For the field of ICT, the EIT has created through the KIC ICT Labs (one of the Knowledge and Innovation Communities), several ICT master programmes to combine ICT engineering on an advanced level with a business minor focused on Innovation and Entrepreneurship (I&E). The goal is to make students that take part in this education the elite group of forthcoming ICT professionals. The unique features of this advanced level education are: A standardized I&E minor Mobility among universities (one year at one university and the second year at another university) Specialisation at one of the European top universities Personal industrial relationships for the students, including industrial mentors and internships at EIT Digital non-university partners as part of the study plan. Thematic area grounding and utilization of resources from EIT Digital research and business activities There are seven ICT programmes (majors), one of them is Internet Technology and Architecture (ITA) offered by a consortium of UPMC (Paris), TUB (Berlin), KTH (Stockholm), UNITN (Trento), UNS (Nice), ITA/TB (Brest) and UPM (Madrid). The first year consists of one semester of core courses on ITA and one semester on Entrepreneurial education. For the second year, students can select a specialisation and complete a thesis project at one of the industrial partners. Internet Technology and Architecture The technical major in Internet Technology and Architecture is a focused programme of study involving advanced networking technologies and architectures for the design and management of modern distributed computer systems and networks. This programme is in line with the challenging field of computing communication and networking technologies that has lately received considerable attention and is today considered as a major topic for most curriculum studies in IT. Programme The aim of the Internet Technology and Architecture programme is to develop a coherent set of theoretical knowledge and professional understandings and skills in computer networks. Emphasis is placed on understanding of current research issues as well as detailed practical experience of network design, development, implementation, and management. The first year will be similar at the four entry points UPMC, TUB, KTH and UNITN with four basic courses on the foundations of networking, network design and modelling, wireless and mobile computing, and advanced next generation networks. In addition, some elective courses may be chosen to prepare for a specialisation. This programme also includes an I&E minor that will provide students with both theoretical concepts and practical tools that will develop critical thinking in assessing entrepreneurship opportunities and devising appropriate strategies to turn ideas into profitable business ventures. The I&E minor consists two courses: The I&E basics course provides an introduction to business and management. The Business Development Lab will extend media systems engineering projects by a market survey, a business model generation process, and a venture development exercise. Students participating in the ITA track will be offered an internship in a partner industry or research centre of the EIT Digital to work on a thesis project. Directly linked to the master thesis, there will be an I&E minor thesis that will specify the requirements, strategy and business plan for the selected thesis project. Specialisations Specialisations will be provided in the second year. The ITA major will offer seven specialisations, each at a different location: User-centric networking at UPMC Internet technologies at TUB Communication systems design at KTH Wireless and mobile access networks at UNITN Networked Analysis and Experimentation at UNS Internet of things at IT/TB Technologies for Internet Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing at UPM To meet the requirements for geographic mobility, the chosen exit point needs to differ from the chosen entry point. Specific Admission Requirements A B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering, electronics, computer science, computer engineering or information technology is required. Sufficient background in basic data communications, telecommunications and internetworking as well as mathematics, including calculus, linear algebra and mathematical statistics is also required. [-]

Master in Human Computer Interaction and Design (HCID)

EIT Digital Master School
Campus September 2017 United Kingdom London

The programme in Human Computer Interaction and Design focuses on study, design, development and evaluation of novel user interfaces and interactive systems taking into account human aspects, at the cognitive and sensory-motor levels, technological aspects, as well as business aspects. [+]

Part time Master Programs in Arts in the London United Kingdom. Why study the EIT Digital Human Computer Interaction and Design programme? The EIT Digital HCID programme offers: Front line technical content within the field Studies at two of Europe´s foremost technical universities leading to a double degree. A good integration with tailored Business courses in Innovation and Entrepreneurship A thesis work well grounded in industrial problems Access to the competence of eight EIT Digital innovation action lines at least through a summer school between the two years. Access to the co-location centers and innovation ecosystems of the nine EIT Digital nodes. What is the programme all about? The programme in Human Computer Interaction and Design focuses on study, design, development and evaluation of novel user interfaces and interactive systems taking into account human aspects, at the cognitive and sensory-motor levels, technological aspects, as well as business aspects. The HCID programme is an interdisciplinary programme that offers courses on design and evaluation of interactive systems with a strong emphasis on user-centered design techniques: understanding the human capacities and consequences of using information technology as a tool for solving work related tasks, and developing and evaluating the systems by putting the user at the center of the design process. In addition, the program will create a business thinking in terms of user profiles, user segments, house style, branding, and market development and product introductions. What are the career opportunities for graduates from the programme? Graduates from the HCID master’s programme will qualify for jobs in international and local organizations in both technical and business roles. Typical titles are: interaction designer or user experience designer, interactive systems engineer, human factors expert, usability engineer, business developer, product manager, or consultant. Through their multidisciplinary attitude graduates are valuable in open innovation settings where different aspects (market, users, social aspects, media technologies) come together. They will easily find jobs within companies that provide value-added products and services, such as telecom companies, game companies, e-learning, web developers, and entertainment. An alternative path would be to start your own company to provide product or technology development, media content, business development or consultancy services. How is the programme structured? The programme is a double degree programme with studies at a university in one country the first year (entry) and studies at a university in another country the second year (exit). The program has an integrated technical content (Technical major) and business content (Innovation & Entrepreneurship – I&E minor). The I&E minor is shared between all programs (link). An integral part of the second year is a Masters thesis (30 ECTS). The structure and content of the technical major is given below. Where can I study If I choose HCID? Entry - 1st year KTH UPS Aalto Twente Exit - 2nd year, specialisation Mobile and ubiquitous interaction (KTH - Stockholm) User modeling (Aalto - Helsinki) Situated interaction (UPS - Paris) Multimodal interaction (TU Berlin) Intelligent systems (Univ. of Twente) Affective computing (UCL - London) Cognitive interaction (UniTN - Trento) Specific Admission Requirements A B.Sc. degree in computer science, electrical engineering, computer engineering or information systems is required. In special cases students from industrial design, media technology, computational linguistics, and cognitive sciences with sufficient skills in mathematics, software design and programming can be considered. [-]

Master Sound Design for Film and TV

NFTS - National Film and Television School
Campus August 2017 United Kingdom London

The components of the soundtrack – dialogue, atmospheres, Foleys, ADR, designed fx and music – are explored in detail using facilities rivalling those of the best audio post-production houses. With a firm emphasis on storytelling, students develop an aesthetic awareness integrated with technical expertise, encouraging them to be collaborators from an early stage in all productions and throughout the whole post-production process... [+]

Sound Design for Film and TV The components of the soundtrack – dialogue, atmospheres, Foleys, ADR, designed fx and music – are explored in detail using facilities rivalling those of the best audio post-production houses. With a firm emphasis on storytelling, students develop an aesthetic awareness integrated with technical expertise, encouraging them to be collaborators from an early stage in all productions and throughout the whole post-production process. In 2011, an NFTS student won the Verna Fields Award for Best Sound Editing in the student category of the US Motion Picture Sound Editors Golden Reel Awards. This is the ninth time a graduating NFTS student has won this award in the last fourteen years and, together with the demand for new graduates, demonstrates the esteem with which this course is regarded within the film and television industry. TUTORS Head of Post Production is Award-winning Re-Recording Mixer Dean Humphreys, who has worked with many of the world's leading directors, including Roman Polanski, Ridley Scott, Luc Besson, Bernardo Bertolucci and Franco Zeffirelli. Dean has also been the Sound Supervisor or Re-Recording mixer for major television series such as Kingdom (Stephen Fry) and Primeval, in addition to films including The Pianist (for which he won a César award), Interview With The Vampire, The Ghost Writer and Donnie Brasco. Other tutors include Graham Hartstone (Aliens, Eyes Wide Shut, Die Another Day, The World is Not Enough), Paul Davies (We Need to Talk About Kevin, The Queen), Andy Kennedy (Game of Thrones, Sherlock Holmes, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince), Adrian Rhodes (The Hollow Crown, Aardman's Pirates!, the Wallace and Gromit films) and Ian Morgan (Vinyl, North and South, Alien vs Predator). ALUMNI Sound Designers Adrian Rhodes (The Queen, Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit), Martin Jensen (The King's Speech, Atonement, The Fades), Paul Davies (We Need to Talk About Kevin, Hunger, The Queen), Miriam Ludbrook (The League of Gentlemen's Apocalypse, Sugar Rush), Stuart Hilliker (Jane Eyre, State of Play) and Lydia Andrew (Audio Director, Electronic Arts) studied at the NFTS. CURRICULUM The course represents a steady progression beginning with the basic technology and skills that underpin and support the creative process and ending with the responsibility for sound design on a range of graduation films. At each stage additional skills are added through specific workshops - e.g. music recording, to provide a comprehensive education that is of great value in understanding and communicating with other industry professionals. Using the latest equipment and technology, students work as sound designers on fiction, documentary and animation projects developing their skills in digital tracklaying and mixing. YEAR ONE A series of exercises focusing on sound editing and mixing techniques Workshops with Editing and Composing students: Abstract Film Workshop Without Images - a sound-only project Dramaturgy Workshop - focusing on script and script analysis, blocking and cover, and performance Editing the Scene - editing a scene to learn the basics of scene structure Short documentary - sound mixing Zen and Beyond - fiction workshop focusing on visual storytelling Documentary Poetry - exploring the use of non- synchronous sound and music Animation projects - the application of music and sound effects 1st year Fiction film - collaborating with all other departments Cross Spec - an introduction to film language and storytelling involving all departments YEAR TWO Investigative Documentary - sound post for the major 1st year Documentary production Remixing the 1st year Fiction film tracks Advanced editing, design and mixing techniques including surround sound mixing 2nd Year Fiction production, shot on a digital format Graduation films in documentary, fiction and animation On the short films and 2nd Year films, Sound Design students work as sound supervisors, creating the track from pre-production through to the mix. Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS In the Post Production department, we are looking to assemble a group of students with diverse and varied backgrounds. There is no 'typical' student or perfect candidate who conforms to a mandatory list of qualifications. Applicants are likely to have some industry experience, or training in their chosen field. Your background may be in the arts or other media, you might be looking for a further professional qualification or wish to broaden your knowledge of sound production, taking you to a higher level of work. Application materials must include visual materials (video or stills) with an associated soundtrack that you have constructed; and a sound montage including speech, that you have created and post-produced. APPLY WITH A DVD of no more than twenty minutes running time, which you have recorded and/or track laid and/or mixed. This can be from a longer work. Those who do not have film/video experience: a narrative sequence of photographs, pictures or cartoons, with an associated speech, music and effects soundtrack recorded on audio CD, which demonstrates the way the applicant works creatively with the audio-visual relationship A sound montage made by the applicant on audio CD of approximately 3 minutes running time. It should include speech, but should not be limited to speech. [-]

Master Producing

NFTS - National Film and Television School
Campus August 2017 United Kingdom London

Educating producers is high on the agenda at the NFTS, and the involvement of several of the UK’s leading film and television producers – NFTS Director Nik Powell, and governors Duncan Kenworthy and Simon Relph – ensures that students enjoy close links with the film and television industry... [+]

Part time Master Programs in Arts in the London United Kingdom. Producing Educating producers is high on the agenda at the NFTS, and the involvement of several of the UK’s leading film and television producers – NFTS Director Nik Powell, and governors Duncan Kenworthy and Simon Relph – ensures that students enjoy close links with the film and television industry. This course commences in January each year. The MA course in Producing is unique in the opportunities it gives and in its close links with the film and television industry, and provides a fast-track route into a producing career. Students develop their own relationships with successful producers through placements and a mentoring scheme. The BFI is supporting the course with development slate funding for students’ adaptation projects, which they can then take with them and develop further when they graduate from the School. The Producing department aims to train creative, independent producers able to achieve an overall vision for their projects from script development through finance and production to sales and distribution. The course covers fiction production for both film and television and also animation, with students producing at least two short live action films and one animation in their time at the School. Graduates work as producers of both film and television in the UK and other countries. New graduates typically combine first feature development with paid employment such as Assistant Producer on feature films, working in the development department of independent production companies, or producing short commissions for broadcasters. Deals struck with the BBC and other companies can see proposals from new graduates developed as feature films. TUTORS Some of the UK's leading independent producers teach at the NFTS including, Karin Bamborough (Former Channel 4 Commissioning Editor), Myf Hopkins (Tombraider II (digital animation and visual effects) and Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Creatures Producer). The Producing department is led by Chris Auty (Stealing Beauty, Crash, In This World). The Director of the NFTS, Nik Powell (The Crying Game, Ladies in Lavender, Little Voice) also teaches on the programme. ALUMNI Producing Alumni include: Allan Niblo – CEO, Vertigo Films (Monsters) Anna Higgs – Commissioning Editor, Film4.0 Jack Arbuthnott – Head, Film Development, Scott Free Rebekah Gilbertson – (Patagonia, Edge of Love) Polly Stokes – Cannes Select (For Those in Peril) Tom Leggett – Film 4 Development Executive James Walker – BAFTA British Short Animation Winner (Sleeping With The Fishes) CURRICULUM Development skills: script analysis and script editing; developing a project from source material; collaboration with writers and directors; pitching; negotiating the deal Production skills: budgeting and scheduling; managing the production; post production techniques; editing, sound and music Business skills: publicity and marketing; sales, distribution and exhibition; co-production; financing; legal and financial (sponsored by Olswang) Television: developing a proposal to a broadcaster’s commissioning brief; the television commissioning process; financing a TV programme; multiplatform commissioning Industry placements for students are encouraged in the summer break of the First Year. Also it is intended that production schedules will allow students in the Second Year to take up work placements at the Cannes Film Festival from which they can learn how the film industry functions on an international level. Each is allocated to either a producer, a distributor or a sales company who they are able to shadow. In addition, all students are expected to choose an industry mentor who acts as a valuable contact who they can use to help them move into the industry. The NFTS provides producers with privileged access to events and screenings at the London Film Festival where they have the opportunity not only to see the latest films but also to discuss them and meet other filmmakers as well. Each year a number of outside visits are arranged for producers. Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS We’re looking for people with a lively and proven interest in film, television and the world about us. The ideal candidate will have a strong personality; good communication skills; a commitment to story-telling; and the ability to work collaboratively. The role of producer is a many-sided one that encompasses creative intelligence, team leadership, and problem-solving skills, and this course equips alumni to succeed equally well as producers or as successful executives in the film and television industry APPLY WITH A one-page proposal written by you for a low-budget feature film or TV drama, either original or adapted from a novel or other source. Tell us why you would like to make it and what you believe its audience appeal could be. If it is an adaptation please give us the title and author of the source material. A brief analysis of three films or television programmes that you have seen in the last 12 months. Include comments on the directorial style. One page A4 in total. An analysis of your favourite film or television programme and your personal response to it. One side A4. Choose a British or European producer (film or TV) whom you admire, explain why. One side A4. Describe briefly key lessons about producing you have learnt from any book about producing or producers that you have read (and please name the book). One side A4. [-]

Master degree in Editing

NFTS - National Film and Television School
Campus August 2017 United Kingdom London

Digital technology has transformed the editing process, yet it has also dramatically diminished the role of the assistant editor so that opportunities to learn the art of editing as an apprentice are increasingly hard to find... [+]

Editing Digital technology has transformed the editing process, yet it has also dramatically diminished the role of the assistant editor so that opportunities to learn the art of editing as an apprentice are increasingly hard to find. This course commences in January each year. This course provides a thorough education in editing skills in a professional filmmaking environment. Editing students are encouraged to consider their craft as part of the whole process of film and television production and not merely as the final stage, making them true collaborators, not just efficient technicians. The emphasis of the Editing curriculum is firmly on storytelling and the relationship between editor and director. Students learn to apply their craft to the demands of fiction, documentary and animation, creating visual narratives while working with sound, music and, where appropriate, special effects. Workshops with other departments develop concepts of visual storytelling, mise-en-scène, storyboarding, sound design, music and scriptwriting. Editing graduates have a high rate of employment on feature films, shorts and television programmes. Many new graduates quickly become editors on independent productions or assistant editors on features or TV drama, while others gravitate to visual effects, promos and i-dents. One recent graduate was joint winner of the Best Young Editor Award at Broadcast Magazine's B+ Awards. Recent graduate editing credits include The Queen, Hannibal Rising, Reprise and New Moon at the cinema and Downton Abbey, Paul Merton in China, Holby City, Hustle, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and Spooks on television. TUTORS Head of Post Production is Award-winning Re-Recording Mixer Dean Humphreys, who has worked with many of the world's leading directors, including Roman Polanski, Ridley Scott, Luc Besson, Bernardo Bertolucci and Franco Zeffirelli. Dean has also been the Sound Supervisor or Re-Recording mixer for major television series such as Kingdom (Stephen Fry) and Primeval, in addition to films including The Pianist (for which he won a César award), Interview With The Vampire, The Ghost Writer and Donnie Brasco. ALUMNI Editors Lucia Zucchetti (The Queen; Mrs Henderson Presents), Alex Mackie (Downton Abbey; St Trinian's; CSI), David Freeman (The Full Monty), Peter Lambert (A Better Life; New Moon), Nicolas Chaudeurge (Wuthering Heights; Fish Tank; Red Road), Valerio Bonelli (Hannibal Rising; Cemetery Junction; Gladiator), Nick Fenton (Submarine; The Arbor), Claire Dodgson (Minions, The Lorax, Charlie and Lola) and Ewa J Lind (Far North; The Warrior) studied here. CURRICULUM YEAR ONE With Sound Design and Composing students Abstract Film Workshop Without Images - a sound-only project Dramaturgy Workshop - focusing on script and script analysis, blocking and cover, and performance Modules and workshops include Foundation exercises for fiction and documentary editing Storyboarding workshop with Animation students Short documentary Zen and Beyond - fiction workshop focusing on visual storytelling Comedy Workshop - workshop using rushes from a feature film and focusing on editing for comedy and/or drama Animation Project - developed and produced to a soundtrack Investigative Documentary - the major first year documentary production First Year Film - the major 1st year fiction production collaborating with all other departments YEAR TWO Fiction editing exercise focusing on drama editing and co-editing using complete rushes from a feature film 2nd year fiction production, shot on a digital format Graduation films in documentary, fiction and animation Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS The Editing course is part of the Post Production department, where we are looking to assemble a group of students with diverse and varied backgrounds. There is no 'typical' student or perfect candidate who conforms to a mandatory list of qualifications. You are likely to have some Industry experience or training in your chosen field. Your background may be in the arts or other media, you might be looking for a further professional qualification or wish to broaden your knowledge of film and video editing, taking you to a higher level of work. APPLY WITH A DVD no more than 20 minutes running time, of material originally shot on film or video edited by you the applicant. If dialogue is not in English or the DVD does not have subtitles you should send a dialogue transcript in English via email. A creative video montage on DVD of found images (obtained from the television, the internet or another source) or existing film footage edited with a soundtrack. The montage should be between 2 and 5 minutes running time, edited by you the applicant. If you do not have access to an editing facility please create a montage of collected photographs which when laid out together tell a story. [-]

Master degree in Directing Documentary

NFTS - National Film and Television School
Campus August 2017 United Kingdom London

This course commences in January each year. The goal of the course is to give our graduates the tools and the confidence to become successful members of the international documentary community. Our students have won the Grierson and Sheffield Student Awards two years running, IDFA and the Royal Television Society last year, and win prizes at the most prestigious festivals round the world: Sundance, IDFA, Hot Docs, Berlin, Sheffield and... [+]

Part time Master Programs in Arts in the London United Kingdom. Directing Documentary This course commences in January each year. The goal of the course is to give our graduates the tools and the confidence to become successful members of the international documentary community. Our students have won the Grierson and Sheffield Student Awards two years running, IDFA and the Royal Television Society last year, and win prizes at the most prestigious festivals round the world: Sundance, IDFA, Hot Docs, Berlin, Sheffield and many others. The most important thing, however, is to prepare them for life as committed documentary storytellers, wherever that may lead. In the UK, getting a first commission can be a daunting task but last year, for example, Marc Williamson, made a First Cut for Channel 4 from his Sheffield student award winning graduation film which this year won him the Grierson Prize for Best Newcomer. Some use the contacts they make in the last phase of the course, to put together deals with TV production companies and non-TV source as Sam Blair did with Adidas for his brilliant feature debut about sprinters, Personal Best. Since students direct and shoot five films in different genres during the course, many progress swiftly by using their unique skills to contribute to productions throughout the industry, like James Newton who won a Grierson last year as one of the directors of The Year the Town Hall Shrank . TUTORS Some of the UK's leading Documentary makers teach at the School, including internationally acclaimed directors Kim Longinotto, Sean McAllister, Asher Tlalim, Nick Broomfield, vastly experienced producer/directors Riete Oord, Ros Franey, award-winning cinematographer Roger Chapman, Rory Peck award winner Rodrigo Vazquez, the founder of Dochouse, Elizabeth Wood, Exec Producer of The Act of Killing, Andre Singer, and successful younger alumni like Lara Agnew, Sandhya Suri, Simon Chambers and Dan Vernon . The department is led by Dick Fontaine who has directed over forty films for television and the independent media, has recently had retrospectives in New York, Paris, Barcelona and Sao Paulo and was nominated last year for a Grierson Award for his latest film. ALUMNI Graduates include Nick Broomfield who pioneered a powerful new genre in documentary: the filmmaker-as- provocateur (The Leader, the Driver and the Driver’s Wife, Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer,and, most recently, Tales from the Grim Sleeper), Grierson Lifetime Achievement Award winner, Molly Dineen (Home from the Hill, The Lie of the Land), Kim Longinotto, whose inspirational films about women are celebrated at festivals around the world (Divorce Iranian–Style, Sisters in Law, and her new film Dreamcatcher), and Sundance winner Sean McAllister (The Liberace of Baghdad, The Reluctant Revolutionary) and many others who are making striking contributions in documentary on many different platforms. CURRICULUM YEAR ONE Built around a series of four practical exercises, increasing in length and complexity, informed and inspired by relevant traditions. Each exercise isolates and focuses on the techniques and content of a specific documentary genre: observation, character–led narrative, image/sound poetry and investigation. Students collaborate in various combinations with editors, cinematographers, sound designers and composers and also work alone using digital video equipment. YEAR TWO Includes three projects: a graduation film in which students synthesise what they have discovered in the first year, and use it to confidently challenge conventional approaches to documentary: an MA dissertation in which they reflect on a practical question that has intrigued them during the course so far and a proposal/taster tape for a project to take into the professional arena. The final stage consists of visits to film festivals, broadcasters, independent producers and other relevant institutions, together with seminars dealing with the commissioning process, legal requirements, finance and festival potential. Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School including an above-the-line cash production budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Students come from a wide variety of backgrounds and have usually had some previous experience of filmmaking, though this may not be at a professional level. All have a strong social awareness and a keen desire to translate that awareness into stories told with a personal voice. APPLY WITH A 20-minute film, conceived and directed by the applicant (on DVD). Please note: if you wish to submit a longer film, only the first 20 minutes will be viewed. If the dialogue is not in English, you should enclose a dialogue transcript in English. OR A narrative photo essay consisting of 10 20cm x 25cm stills. AND A written proposal for a different film of any specified length (on no more than 4 sides of A4, typed and double-spaced) which should include the basic premise, a description of the characters and locations and, most importantly, the developing narrative. [-]