California Institute of Integral Studies

Introduction

California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS) is an innovative, forward-thinking university based in San Francisco, California.

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At CIIS, you engage in issues vital to you, to today's world, and to your personal growth, exploring the deep connections that unite them. You study in innovative academic programs at the undergraduate or graduate level and encounter a lively and diverse community of learners that honors multiple ways of teaching, learning, and knowing. Here you find the knowledge and experience you need for the life and career you want.

At the university, you can choose from 25 different academic programs and:

  • Pursue a one-of-a-kind course of study that offers you expansive ways of looking at the world in an academically rigorous setting
  • Build your capacity as a healer, change-maker, scholars, and community leader
  • Explore traditions of knowledge from many cultures and viewpoints, while experiencing some of the most forward-looking visions of the future
  • Connect with internationally recognized faculty who are committed to your education
  • Train with experienced clinicians at one of our award-winning counseling psychology or acupuncture centers
  • Create practicums or capstone projects that immerse you in collaborations with the communities you study
  • Enjoy lectures, concerts, art exhibits, and performances
    • CIIS is a private, non-profit university, accredited since 1981 by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WSCUC). We offer federal financial aid and scholarships. sth
      CIIS offers 25 academic programs, organized within four schools.

      School of Professional Psychology and Health:

      Clinical Psychology, PsyD
      Counseling Psychology, M.A. with concentrations in:
      • Community Mental Health
      • Drama Therapy
      • Expressive Arts Therapy
      • Integral Counseling
      • Somatic Psychology
      Human Sexuality, Ph.D.
      Integrative Health Studies, M.A.

      School of Consciousness and Transformation:

      Doctor of Philosophy programs:
      • Anthropology and Social Change
      • East-West Psychology
      • Integral and Transpersonal Psychology
      Philosophy & Religion with concentrations in:
      • Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion
      • Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness
      • Women's Spirituality
      • Transformative Studies
      Master of Arts programs:
      • Anthropology and Social Change
      • East-West Psychology, With a certificate in Spiritual Counseling
      • Philosophy & Religion with concentrations in:
      • Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion
      • Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness
      • Transformative Leadership
      • Women, Gender, Spirituality, and Social Justice
      Master of Fine Arts programs:
      • Creative Inquiry, Interdisciplinary Arts
      • Theatre-Performance Making
      • Writing and Consciousness

      ACTCM at CIIS

      • Master of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine (MSTCM)
      • First Professional Doctorate in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine (DACM)
      • Post Graduate Doctorate of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (DAOM)

      School of Undergraduate Studies:

      Bachelor's Degree Completion:
      • Interdisciplinary Studies, B.A.
      • Minor in Critical Psychology offered
This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programmes

This school also offers:

Master

Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology, Concentration in Community Mental Health

Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

CIIS has trained MFT's since 1973 and graduates have had one of the highest pass rates on the MFT exam, with a 96% pass rate. Since 1973 the Master's in Counseling Program has responded to changes in the field. [+]

Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology, Concentration in Community Mental Health CIIS has trained MFT's since 1973 and graduates have had one of the highest pass rates on the MFT exam, with a 96% pass rate. Since 1973 the Master's in Counseling Program has responded to changes in the field. Community Mental Health evolved out of this trend in providing innovative educational opportunities and the changing needs in the field. In order to better meet the changing landscape of public mental health, CIIS was an early adapter of the CMH curriculum, and as such, a pioneer in developing master's level coursework and specialty training for those interested in careers in public mental health. In the spirit of the Mental Health Services Act stakeholders in the public mental health system were invited to the table to help plan the needs of master's level counseling students. This included working with local public mental health; community-based organizations; consumers; community members; and service providers. Out of this work the CMH program developed the following program goals: CMH will provide strong clinical training built on Psychodynamics, Humanistic Mindfulness, and Family Systems Therapy Trauma-informed therapies; Recovery and resiliency models of treatment; Social justice perspectives, and Community psychology theory and praxis. CMH trains students with a strong theoretical base to be proficient as licensed, independent mental health practitioners either as a licensed MFT or LPCC. These skills include: Assessment, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment planning; Outcomes Evaluation; Cultural Humility; Best Practices; and Practice-Based Evidence. The CMH program models itself on the public mental health model, providing opportunities for peer-based support and services; Wellness Recovery Action Planning for students; community meetings; and access to MHSA-based support services for students of color; LGBT students; consumers of public mental health services and their family members; and veterans. We welcome a diverse cohort of students to come together to learn to become licensed therapists, clinical case managers, change agents within the mental health system. Our trainees and graduate students are consistently sought after in the public mental health system and in community organizations. We welcome you to become part of the next generation of students trained and ready for system transformation. Statement of Diversity: Diversity and the recognition of multiple perspectives is a core value of the Community Mental Health Program at CIIS. We celebrate and embrace these diverse perspectives as a source of strength, creativity and relevance in our field. Our differences and how we each live those differences - be they of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, socioeconomic status, abilities, experiences and more - enhance our ability to achieve the Institute's core mission to embody spirit, intellect, and wisdom in service to individuals, communities and the Earth. We do this by framing our studies in the context of social justice, liberation psychologies and including, respecting, and valuing the voices of the communities we serve in our students, staff, faculty and where we provide service. Training Clinical Training The clinical training component of the CMH program is fully integrated into the Master's degree program. In the first year students will have assignments which bring them into agencies and programs to learn firsthand what is happening in community mental health in our area. In year two (see below) students will begin to gain experience and deliver services and in year three they will take clinical practicum courses. It is in practicum that students begin, with supervision, to engage in therapy with clients. Each student plays a key role in identifying sites for field work and clinical practicum. The CMH office and the Field Placement team are ready and eager to help students make good choices. Once made, those choices must be approved by the Director of the CMH program and the Director of Field Education Year 2- Clinical Field Study (2-units) Over the course of two semesters students will engage in (2) one-unit courses that will introduce the student to clinical fieldwork. Students will explore the development of professional identity, client engagement, client advocacy, psychosocial education and case management. Completion of the course will require attendance in weekly classes plus 6-8 hours per week of documented fieldwork in an approved site. Year 3- Clinical Practicum (4-units) Over the course of two semesters students will engage in (2) two-unit courses that will enhance clinical training in the practicum. Students will continue their development of professional identity as the student learns to become a psychotherapist and integrate what is learned in the classroom with the experience at the practicum site. Completion of the course will require attendance in weekly classes plus 16-20 hours per week of documented training in an approved site. Students must complete a minimum of 500 qualifying BBS hours between their fieldwork and practicum training, but may complete as many as 1300. The remaining qualifying hours may then be accrued post-graduation. Apply to the Community Mental Health Program About the Program Taking a systemic approach, this 60-unit, three-year program integrates the fundamentals of intensive and supplemental case management with an emphasis on counseling, cultural competence and a public sector practicum. Delivered in a variety of formats, the curriculum graduated students job-ready for high-demand public sector careers and prepared to sit for Marriage and Family Therapy licensure. Designed in collaboration with leading mental health providers, this program meets critical needs: Therapeutic A growing number of clients with multiple diagnoses require a different level and type of therapy. Cultural The profession needs more practitioners from diverse backgrounds who are culturally competent and bilingual or multilingual. Professional Nearly 70 percent of San Francisco's public mental health work force will retire within the next 10 years-a trend that is echoed throughout the state and the nation. Admissions Requirements Admissions Application: The online application can be found on the school website. Non-refundable $65 application fee Degree Requirement: An undergraduate degree (BA, BS, or the equivalent) from an accredited college or university. Transcripts: Official transcripts from all accredited academic institutions attended within the United States. Transcripts must arrive in their official, sealed envelopes. Goal Statement: A one-page statement of professional goals and objectives that shows demonstrated commitment to the field of community mental health. Resume Autobiographical Statement: A four-to-six page (typed, double-spaced) introspective autobiographical statement emphasizing how you arrived at your current commitment to work in the area of community mental health and describing life experiences that have led to your decision to apply. Two Letters of Recommendation: Letters of recommendation will be accepted from academic advisors, professors, professional supervisors, or someone able to attest to your ability to undertake the work required for your program. Recommenders should use standard business format and include full contact information-name, email, phone number, and mailing address. International students and individuals who have studied at institutions outside the US and Canada may have additional requirements. Candidate Selection In selecting candidates for admission, the program considers the following factors to be desirable: a background, interest, and demonstrated commitment to public and community mental health (work or volunteer), and evidence of a commitment to achieving positive health outcomes in these settings. Alternatively, experience in community planning, community organizing, and/or social justice in a paid or volunteer position will be helpful, as well as sufficient personal stability, and energy to become an effective therapist, and academic records that indicate probable success in completing graduate studies.The statement of professional goals and objectives submitted with the application form should address these issues. In addition to the above considerations, the program seeks individuals who exhibit the interpersonal communication skills required of psychotherapists.These include a congruence of feelings and action, an ability to listen and attend, a willingness to be self-reflective, and an openness to evaluating and changing behaviors and attitudes.As the program operates on a cohort model, students are interviewed about their goals, objectives, and experiences.These interviews aim to create a cohort of students who can support, motivate, and sustain one another during the seven semesters of study. [-]

Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology, Concentration in Drama Therapy

Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

The CIIS Drama Therapy program is one of only three master's programs in the United States both regionally accredited and approved by the North American Drama Therapy Association, and is one of only a handful of such programs in the world. [+]

MA in Counseling Psychology with a Concentration in Drama Therapy Freedom and possibility are two key words that begin to describe the essence of drama therapy. Life is finite; there are only so many experiences we can have. But in drama, the opportunities and options are endless, enabling us to dive more deeply into the richness of life. And when the dramas are authentic and "real," they have the power to affect, and even alter, our real lives profoundly. For the past thirty years, we have been investigating how therapeutically adapted dramatic processes work over time to heal wounds, facilitate lasting change, and help people reach their highest potential. -Renée Emunah, Program Founder/Director The program allowed me to tap into the limitless storehouse of compassion, imagination, play, and resiliency inside of me and helped me channel all that into my fullest potential as a therapist and human being. It was an all-encompassing and transformative experience. As a storyteller, scholar, and now clinician, the impacts of the Drama Therapy program at CIIS will continue to serve me professionally and reverberate through me and those with whom I come into contact. -Aileen Cho, Program Alumna, MA (2012) One of my most life changing experiences! The Drama Therapy program at CIIS gave me the personal and clinical resources I needed to become a skilled therapist, while remaining in touch with my artist self. -Dorothy Lemoult, Program Alumna, MA (2011) The CIIS Drama Therapy program is one of only three master's programs in the United States both regionally accredited and approved by the North American Drama Therapy Association, and is one of only a handful of such programs in the world. CIIS is internationally recognized as housing one of the world's most highly developed and rigorous training programs for drama therapists. FOR FALL 2016 ADMISSION THE APPLICATION DEADLINE WILL BE IN JANUARY 15, 2016 Admission opens November 15th, 2015. All application materials need to be submitted by January 15th, 2016. Interviews will take place in late February and early March, 2016. About the Program The Drama Therapy Program at CIIS is one of the only master 's level programs accredited in the field nationwide. Our aim is to take students on a challenging and compelling personal and intellectual journey toward deeper levels of understanding and developing competence in drama therapy. Our commitment is to provide a serious, multilayered training in using this potent medium ethically, respectfully, and skillfully. Faculty and students delve into the complexities, subtleties, and possibilities of drama therapy. Coursework is sequenced and progressive. Theoretical, practical/clinical, and experiential formats are incorporated. Small, action-oriented classes within a cohort model support students' personal development and a sense of community. While many people come to our program already personally familiar with the transformative power of drama, even the first semester of the program reveals new dimensions to the field and gives a glimpse of the vast range of exploration ahead. An integral part of the program is on-site clinical training and supervision at a wide range of possible placement sites. Interns receive individual weekly supervision on-site by a licensed clinician, as well as small-group supervision at CIIS with a Registered Drama Therapist (RDT). In their final semester of the program, students take an Integrative Seminar which supports the development of a capstone project. This final project may be a theoretical article, a live, self-revelatory (therapeutic) theater performance, or a DVD documenting a drama therapy treatment process. All formats are presented publicly to a community of peers, family, and friends, leading to a sense of culminating achievement in the program. CIIS is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). The program follows the academic guidelines set forth by the North American Drama Therapy Association and meets academic requirements for registry as a drama therapist (RDT). The program also fulfills academic requirements for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT*) licensure in the state of California. Coursework preparing for licensure as a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) is also available. *Please note that in order to become a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, you must also complete 3,000 hours of internship in addition to your educational requirements. You will graduate from our program with between 700 and 1,000 hours that will count toward licensure. Apply to the Drama Therapy Program We seek (and seem to attract!) creative, motivated, mature students who have already demonstrated a strong interest in the integration of theater and therapy. Integrity, introspection, and dedication are all essential attributes. Our students come to the program from around the world. Applicants must have a background in drama/theater and a minimum of two undergraduate psychology courses. Volunteer or paid work experience in human services is strongly recommended. Diversity We encourage and embrace diversity in our program, and place a high value on having students from a variety of racial and cultural backgrounds; other representations of diversity (including age range) are also important to us. We look at each applicant holistically, and if you feel passionate about this field, we welcome your application. Admission Requirements THE DEADLINE TO APPLY FOR THE FALL SEMESTER IS JANUARY 15. Admission is for the Fall semester only. Those applicants who are selected to interview will be invited to San Francisco for interviews that are held in late February to early March. Admissions Application Non-refundable $65 Application Fee Degree Requirement: An undergraduate degree (BA, BS, or BFA) from an accredited college or university. Transcripts: Official transcripts from all accredited academic institutions attended within the United States. Transcripts must arrive in their official, sealed envelopes. Autobiographical Statement: A five to seven page (12 pt font, double-spaced) introspective essay in which you reflect on significant childhood and adult life experiences that have affected your personal development. Goal Statement: A one page (12 pt font, double-spaced) statement of your educational and professional interests, goals or passions. Two Letters of Recommendation: From academic advisors, professors or professional supervisors. Recommenders should use standard business format and include full contact information-name, email, phone number, and mailing address. Resume/Outline: A one to two page outline listing your background/experience (if any) in: (1) theater (2) psychology (3) human services work, and (4) creative arts therapy. Academic Prerequisites: Two undergraduate psychology courses from an accredited college or university are required. They may be in progress during the application process. Interview: Individual and group interviews by invitation from the admissions committee. International students and individuals who have studied at institutions outside the US and Canada may have additional requirements. [-]

Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology, Concentration in Expressive Arts Therapy

Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

At CIIS, expressive arts therapy refers to a therapeutic approach with individuals, couples, families, groups, and community-based programs that integrates a wide range of arts modalities in the service of human growth, development and healing. [+]

Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology, Concentration in Expressive Arts Therapy The Expressive Arts Therapy Program is still accepting applications for Fall, 2015! What is Expressive Arts Therapy? At CIIS, expressive arts therapy refers to a therapeutic approach with individuals, couples, families, groups, and community-based programs that integrates a wide range of arts modalities in the service of human growth, development and healing. It takes a multi-arts or multimodal approach, integrating painting, drawing, sculpture, dance/movement, music, drama, ritual, poetry, and prose within therapeutic encounters. Expressive arts therapists seek to build a compassionate, supportive, and culturally-sensitive relationship with clients. The expressive arts become the medium through which clients can explore and potentially transform emotional, social, spiritual, and relational issues; identify strengths; and experience new creative insights. Expressive arts therapy processes are used successfully in almost all psychotherapeutic contexts, ranging from work with people faced with chronic and persistent mental health challenges, to the facilitation of human growth and potential. Mission The EXA@CIIS program educates and trains the future leaders of the Expressive Arts therapy field. We use the power of the arts as tools for human development & healing, psycho-spiritual growth, social change, and empowered self-agency. This This is accomplished through an innovative Scholar-Artist-Practitioner model bridging gaps between academic knowledge, clinical practice and community engagement with the arts at the center. Our faculty considers each student to be a unique contributor to the learning community due to their diverse backgrounds, experience and interests. A Comprehensive Training in Counseling and Psychotherapy The Expressive Arts Therapy program integrates a thorough education in theories and methods of psychotherapy with intensive training in expressive arts therapy. This three-year full-time program covers individual, group, couples, and family therapy, and includes a year-long practicum under the supervision of licensed mental health professionals who are also expressive arts therapists. The training meets the educational requirements for California's Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) license and is also designed to meet the educational requirements to become a Registered Expressive Arts Therapist (REAT) with the International Expressive Arts Therapy Association (IEATA). A Range of Theoretical Frameworks The principles of liberation psychology and relational-cultural theory (RCT) provide overarching theoretical frameworks for the curriculum. The EXA program also provides students with foundational knowledge and skills of the major schools of psychotherapy through multicultural and feminist lenses. These include contemporary psychoanalytic and psychodynamic approaches; Jungian; existential-humanist; cognitive-behavioral; mindfulness-based; narrative and constructivist; as well as a range of family systems approaches. The program places a high premium on sensitivity and responsiveness to the needs of the very diverse communities of the Bay Area in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual preference, differing abilities, and socioeconomic status. This is reflected in all aspects of the formal curriculum as well as in our approach to pedagogy in the classroom. Multiple Expressive Arts Approaches There are multiple theoretical foundations for an expressive arts practice. At CIIS, students have an opportunity to receive foundational training in a wide range of expressive arts approaches. The most established approaches include person-centered, movement-centered, intermodal, and narrative and collaborative expressive arts therapies. Hands on Learning CIIS EXA students typically complete their clinical fieldwork in the third year, beginning in the fall semester and ending the following summer. In the first year, students begin receiving hands-on training in-class as well as visiting and interviewing practitioners in the community. The program also maintains partnerships with community organizations, including GLIDE's Family Youth & Child Center and Contra Costa Health Services, to offer students additional opportunities to practice prior to their third year clinical fieldwork. Learning Outcomes EXA is a dynamic program weaving the arts across the curriculum, enabling students to: Demonstrate capacity to integrate a range of expressive arts practices into psychotherapy with individuals, couples, families, and groups; with sensitivity to differences including gender identification, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, differing abilities, socioeconomic status, and spiritual and religious practices Translate expressive arts interventions and processes into standard psychological language, and vice versa Articulate when expressive arts approaches are appropriate and when they may be contraindicated within particular clinical situations Demonstrate capacity to weave together expressive arts and recovery-oriented principles and practices into treatment Demonstrate personal growth and development through the use of expressive arts practices Demonstrate ability to conceptualize and intervene holistically (addresses body, mind, and spirit) Admission to the Program Because we believe that individuals can tap into an innate healing power, our curriculum explores interconnections between spirituality and creativity. One of four programs in the world that concentrate in this specialty, ours brings together the therapeutic arts-visual, musical, dramatic. CIIS' intensive training combines coursework with individual and group expressive arts psychotherapy, plus a yearlong clinical practicum. Students come from all over the world to enroll in our three-year program. They work in a variety of psychotherapeutic contexts, and in a wide range of business and professional settings. Our coursework meets the academic requirements for California's Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) license and is designed to meet the educational requirements to become a Registered Expressive Arts Therapist (REAT) with the International Expressive Arts Therapy Association (IEATA). [-]

Master of Fine Arts Programmes (MFA)

Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

As artists, writers and performers in the heart of San Francisco, our work is influenced by technological innovation, cultural transformation, and urban redesign. Our curriculum gives students a chance to focus on their own practice in an interdisciplinary setting. [+]

Master of Fine Arts Programs (MFA) Welcome to the MFA Programs at CIIS! As artists, writers and performers in the heart of San Francisco, our work is influenced by technological innovation, cultural transformation, and urban redesign. Our curriculum gives students a chance to focus on their own practice in an interdisciplinary setting. In our two year, 48-unit intensives you will complete one or more of the following: a book-length manuscript or chapbook an evening-length dance, theatrical, or musical performance a visual arts exhibition in our street level main gallery a social justice/community arts project We offer: Intimate class sizes Mentoring with outstanding, committed faculty A weekend intensive format that is ideal for working adults Diverse perspectives and transdisciplinary approaches to art-making Direct and constant access to the rich Bay Area art scene Art-making can be a pioneering, transformative act that changes-and sometimes revolutionizes-culture. Students in this program become more self-reflective and skillful in their practice. Through intensive and transdisciplinary dialogue, they see their work in a broader artistic, philosophical, and cultural dialogue, and develop innovative, experimental, and meaningful work that challenges personal and cultural narratives and perceptions. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Applicants must meet the general admissions requirements of the Institute. Students must complete their bachelor's degree before beginning the programs; there is no requirement as to the field of study of the undergraduate degree. Students can demonstrate appropriate levels of accomplishment and commitment to their art by means of work samples and personal statements. We welcome students from all backgrounds; however, the Admissions Committee may ask students with limited arts or writing experience to supplement their degrees with some additional CIIS coursework. The program admits students in the fall (beginning in late August) and spring (beginning in late January) semesters. [-]

MA

Anthropology and Social Change MA and PhD Programmes

Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

We believe that anthropologists should analyze, discuss, and explore the possible; that they should research alternative institutions; that they need to collectively reflect and debate the dilemmas of other possible worlds. [+]

Anthropology and Social Change MA and PhD Programs The Anthropology and Social Change is unique among graduate programs in the United States due to its focus on activist anthropology. We believe that anthropologists should analyze, discuss, and explore the possible; that they should research alternative institutions; that they need to collectively reflect and debate the dilemmas of other possible worlds. This collective effort of understanding "real utopias" takes the form of analytic and ethnographic study of existing alternatives in the present. Together with the activists of the World Social Forum, we believe that "another world is possible." The role of the new social movements, we are reminded, is not to conquer the world, but to make it anew. What, then, is the role and responsibility of anthropology and other social sciences? In a world riddled with so many crises, few things appear to be more relevant than systematic research of counter-hegemonic knowledge and practices. Social scientists should leave pessimism for better times. Anthropology, in particular, is well equipped to participate in the "nowtopian" task of constructing social scientific knowledge that looks beyond inequality, hierarchy, and ecological disaster. About the MA Program in Anthropology and Social Change The master of arts program in Anthropology and Social Change is unique among graduate programs in the United States due to the its focus on activism and social justice. We recognize social movements as a key location of knowledge production alongside that of the university. The mission of the MA program is to generate a dialogue among agents active in these two locations of knowledge production. Our intention is to establish a particular kind of institutional space where social movement activists immersed in organizing would meet scholars primarily engaged in theoretical work. The program, inspired by the vision of the Popular University of Social Movements, created by the initiative of Boaventura de Sousa Santos, is envisioned as a space of translation of academic and grassroots knowledge and experiences, produced in the encounter among social scientists, artists, and activists from the Bay Area. Students will work with some of the most prominent activists in San Francisco Bay Area, as well as with core faculty from the department and the Institute. In this process of encounter and co-learning, students and faculty are expected to share ideas, debates, and practices of radical politics and social movements, as well as practical skills in research, organizing, campaigning, policy analysis, legal and environmental work, and activist media. The MA in Anthropology and Social Change provides students with an opportunity to simultaneously engage with the world of prefigurative social struggles and with the world of social science and radical theory. As our program is located in an area that is unique in terms of diversity and richness of social struggles, we encourage students to establish a relationship with local social justice groups, organizations, movements, and campaigns. Activist ethnography with a focus on postcapitalist research makes this investigative experience rewarding both for students and for the local community. Our MA program focuses on creating contexts and spaces of encounter among social scientists, theorists, artists, and activists (for a more detailed elaboration of this educational vision, visit universidadepopular.org). We welcome students interested in becoming activists and scholars. The program offers three interrelated sets of courses. Required theoretical courses include ideas for action, global social movements, radical political economy, radical theory, and unthinking social science. Research courses include activist ethnography I and activist ethnography II. Activist skills include media skills (strategic filmmaking, writing and publishing, Internet skills, radical radio), and organizing skills (legal skills, policy analysis, environmental skills, and campaigning and organizing skills). Students are expected to choose three out of the five activist organizing skills courses (organizing, analysis, campaigning, environmental, or legal) and three out of four activist media skills courses (radical radio, filmmaking, web, or activist writing). A key aspect of the MA program is a research-based portfolio. In the first year of the program students are expected to begin to make contacts or seek out appropriate material for the completion of a research portfolio. Students are encouraged to do an activist research practicum with a community group or organization in order to undertake original research. This work culminates in an integrative seminar that students are expected to take in the last semester of their graduate study. The portfolio is comprised of a project based on activist research (this could be a campaign report, research report, website, video, or radio document), a collection of essays from core courses in the program, and one shorter integrative essay. Career Outcomes The MA in Anthropology and Social Change offers an opportunity to develop research, theory, and skills that are relevant to careers in education and social justice work. Our program has been structured to respond to two related aims: the first is to provide a particular experience in training for research in education; and the second is to provide relevant knowledge and skills required by social movements, networks, and nonprofit/non-governmental organizations. Like our sister programs in Leeds, Maynooth, and Exeter, the program will offer students extensive knowledge of critical theory and activist anthropology; academic skills needed for continuation of their graduate studies; engagement with the important debates in anthropology and other social sciences; experience in working with networks and community groups; competence in various activist research techniques; organizing and media skills appropriate for employment in a range of progressive and social justice professional environments. About the PhD Program in Anthropology and Social Change The Anthropology and Social Change PhD is unique among graduate programs in the United States due to its focus on exploring counter-hegemonic alternatives, postcapitalist cultures, and prefigurative practices. In a certain sense, we are a department of postcapitalist studies. However, by this complicated word, postcapitalism, we do not wish to refer to some dreamed-up utopia, nor to a speculative exploration of futuristic scenarios. While we agree with Lewis Mumford on the "importance of building castles in the sky," we see as an even more urgent necessity to study politics of alternatives in the here and now: the need to engage with postcapitalist cultures that are already being built, and to understand other worlds that are already possible. Together with the activists of the World Social Forum, we believe that "another world is possible." The role of the new social movements, we are reminded, is not to conquer the world, but to make it anew. What, then, is the role and responsibility of anthropology and other social sciences? In a world riddled with so many crises, few things appear to be more relevant than systematic research of counter-hegemonic knowledge and practices. Social scientists should leave pessimism for better times. Anthropology, in particular, is well equipped to participate in the "nowtopian" task of constructing social scientific knowledge that looks beyond capitalism, hierarchy, and ecological disaster. The practice and technique of ethnography provides an important model of a possible "postcapitalist" social science. As one contemporary anthropologist, a friend of our program, recently noted, when one "carries out an ethnography, one observes what people do, and then tries to tease out the hidden symbolic, moral, or pragmatic logics that underlie their actions; one tries to get at the way people's habits and actions make sense in ways that they are not themselves completely aware of." We ask our students to do precisely this: to look at those who are creating viable alternatives, to try to figure out what might be the larger implications of what they are already doing, and then to offer those ideas back, not as prescriptions, but as contributions, possibilities-as gifts. This program offers the space and the possibility to engage with many traditions of radical scholarship and emancipatory social science. We believe that anthropologists should analyze, discuss, and explore the possible; that they should research alternative institutions; that they need to collectively reflect and debate the dilemmas of activist anthropology. The collective effort of understanding "real utopias" takes the form of analytic and ethnographic study of real historical alternatives in the present. This, in turn, requires a serious engagement with social movements involved in the production of alternatives. Students are expected to have an excellent command of history, debates, and perspectives of contemporary social movements. These movements exist in the historical, social, and epistemological context of colonization, development, and globalization. As contributors to the book Contesting Development remind us, more then one in six humans now live in slums, over one billion in a world of jobless growth, or no growth. Solutions offered by mainstream social science are often the source of the problem, and our students are expected to have a good understanding of intertwined historical processes of colonization, development, and liberal modernity. The doctoral program is distinctive for its focus on alternatives. What are some of them? Worker cooperatives in Oakland, social centers in Italy, autonomous systems of justice in Guerrero, community gardens in Detroit, occupied self-managed factories in Argentina, "good government" of the Zapatistas, buen vivir (good life) and plurinationalism in Bolivia, participatory democracy in Kerala, solidarity economics of Mondragon, participatory economics in Winnipeg, pedagogy of the block in African-American communities, alternative environmentalism in Afro-Colombian river regions, legal pluralism, autonomy of migration, marginalized medical practices in South Asia, solidarity unionism in New York City, communal agriculture in Malawi, shack dweller democracy in South Africa, Copwatch in LA, biodiversity in Brazil, restorative justice in Ohio, knowledge commons and globalization, independent media, and autonomous food systems in Japan, are only some of the examples of postcapitalist possibilities. There are so many more, and one of the responsibilities of our students is to discover them. The program is distinctive in its emphasis on: - Postcapitalist analysis of historical alternatives in the present - Global social movements and lost revolutionary treasures - Issues of colonialism, globalization, development - Anarchist, Marxist, feminist theoretical perspectives - Political ecology - Integration of activism and scholarship: developing research skills in activist ethnography, intercultural translation, and emancipatory research Many classes include a research component, and the doctoral dissertation is based on activist ethnographic research. Activist ethnographic frameworks include participatory and collaborative research approaches as well as more recent research techniques and strategies associated with militant research and co-research approaches. [-]

Asian Philosophies and Cultures MA and PhD Programmes

Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

The Asian Philosophies and Cultures Program is committed to integrative, cross-cultural study and research in Asian religions and philosophies as they have developed regionally and impacted each other and the world from the classical period through the present and into the future. [+]

Asian Philosophies and Cultures MA and PhD Programs The Asian Philosophies and Cultures Program is committed to integrative, cross-cultural study and research in Asian religions and philosophies as they have developed regionally and impacted each other and the world from the classical period through the present and into the future. In keeping with this commitment, the program brings together both traditional and contemporary approaches to classical Asian material and, within an integrative framework, brings these approaches to bear on issues of contemporary relevance. Such issues include but are not limited to: Asian religions and conflict, Asian philosophical perspectives and ecology, traditional Asian practices of mindfulness and well-being, and cross-cultural hermeneutics. The program is distinctive in its recognition that spiritual discovery and practice can contribute to academic rigor in the study of Asian religious and philosophical traditions and their application to contemporary challenges. Its scope includes study of Buddhism, Hinduism, Chinese philosophy, and Islam, with respect to their classical development and their continuing global impact in the modern world. Students examine classical texts and contexts, spiritual practices and disciplines, and issues of contemporary relevance such as the contribution of Asian traditions to psychology, cognitive science, modern and post-modern philosophy, and the emergent ecological crisis. Courses in interdisciplinary research methods and optional language study complete the curriculum. Students gain an in-depth understanding of philosophical and religious thought in classical and contemporary contexts through their engagement with the curriculum and collaboration with faculty mentors and fellow students. The curriculum focuses on practical skills in interdisciplinary research and teaching as well as cross-cultural communication as preparation for research and teaching in the fields of comparative philosophy and religious studies. Students are also encouraged and mentored in envisioning creative applications of Asian thought that may provide employment in areas outside academia. Our Faculty and Community Students love our program for many reasons. Our faculty foster a rigorous academic environment that also recognizes the importance of and supports a student's overall well-being. We encourage students and members of our wider community to join us for regular community events, including a monthly colloquium series that invites students to share their research on Asian philosophical and religious texts in a supportive environment. In addition to our core faculty, students also have several opportunities each year to attend classes and free guest lectures presented by world-renowned visiting scholars. Masters Program The Asian Philosophies and Cultures MA Program seeks to create and sustain an academic environment in which students gain a broad foundation in Asian philosophy, religion, and culture, through engaging critically with textual, historical, sociological/anthropological, and practical applications of Asian thought and culture. Students in the MA program in Asian Philosophies and Cultures are expected to critically reflect upon, synthesize, and apply knowledge and skills in the disciplines of comparative philosophy and Asian religions. Upon completion, students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in the following: 1.Demonstrate a critical understanding of the scholarship in religious studies and philosophy. Learn and apply research skills. Identify and access appropriate resources and critically analyze and evaluate material. Apply existing research methodologies, techniques, and technical skills and evaluate research in the field. Communicate in a style appropriate to the disciplines. Demonstrate a detailed overview of the histories, traditions, and tenets of Hinduism, Buddhism and Chinese philosophy. 2.Demonstrate engagement with current advances within the field and related areas. 3.Demonstrate ability to work with multiple perspectives and theoretical traditions. 4.Demonstrate the principles of integral education by thinking critically and deeply across paradigms, traditions, worldviews, and ways of knowing. 5.Demonstrate professional skills in relation to career development Adhere to ethical standards in the discipline. Doctoral Program The Asian Philosophies and Cultures doctorate offers intensive study in the spiritual and philosophical traditions of South Asia, China, and the Himalayan regions, both with respect to classical and contemporary contexts. The PhD consists of 36 semester units of coursework, plus two comprehensive examinations and a dissertation. The coursework consists of twelve units within the program, twelve units in Asian-themed electives, and twelve units in general electives. Graduates of our PhD program are expected to: 1.Make an original and substantive contribution to the disciplines of Asian religion or philosophy. Think independently to develop questions, concepts, and methodologies. Identify new research opportunities within these fields. Reflect critically upon the histories, tenets, and traditions in their major field. Keep abreast of current advances within these fields and related areas. 2.Demonstrate advanced research and writing skills Synthesize existing knowledge, identifying and accessing appropriate resources and other sources of relevant information and critically analyzing and evaluating their own findings and those of others. Master application of existing research methodologies, techniques, and technical skills. Understand the range of issues in the comparative approach to religion and philosophy. Demonstrate ability to write about complex ideas and research in a professional and nuanced manner. 3.Demonstrate commitment to participation in the community of scholars. Show commitment to personal professional development through engagement in professional societies, publication, and other knowledge transfer modes. Show commitment to supporting and promoting learning through teaching, collaborative inquiry, or professional practice. 4.Demonstrate ability to situate scholarship in relationship to social and personal transformation. Situate self in relationship to work and multiple perspectives. Build upon internal passion and vision toward external career and action. 5.Demonstrate professional skills. Adhere to ethical standards in the discipline and in relation to the communities studied. Listen, give, and receive feedback effectively. Communicate in a style appropriate to the discipline and setting. Appropriately use media for the dissemination of work. PhD Language Recommendation PhD students may be required to demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language if it is deemed essential for the student's dissertation research. Language proficiency may be demonstrated by having passed two years of course work in the study of a language, or additional language study depending on the dissertation topic. [-]

East-West Psychology MA and PhD Programmes

Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

East-West Psychology (EWP) is a multidisciplinary hub and learning community where psychological and spiritual traditions of the East, West, and Indigenous cultures from around the world meet to converse and transform each other. [+]

East-West Psychology The East-West Psychology Department offers three degree programs: Ph.D. in East-West Psychology Master of Arts in East-West Psychology Advanced Certificate in East-West Spiritual Counseling East-West Psychology (EWP) is a multidisciplinary hub and learning community where psychological and spiritual traditions of the East, West, and Indigenous cultures from around the world meet to converse and transform each other. Through its unique combination of cognitive, collaborative, and experiential offerings, the department grounds academic excellence and the acquisition of professional skills in both the personal transformation of students and the cultivation of a spiritually informed scholarship. Our graduates deliver their skills to a world yearning for new sources of meaning and enchantment rooted in deep psychologies and ancient traditions. About MA Program The M.A. in East-West Psychology is a two-year program requiring 36 units of study. The structure of the program is designed to provide an ample degree of flexibility that allows students to focus on specific areas of study, as well as to explore a variety of Western, Eastern, and indigenous approaches to psychology and spirituality. With the guidance of academic advisors, students design their own individualized curriculum, possible area of specialization, and psychospiritual approach. There are no required summer courses, although students may take electives during the summer to expand their studies or distribute their course load over five or six semesters. Admission Applicants must meet the general admission requirements of the Institute. Two letters of recommendation are required from individuals familiar with the applicant's academic work and preparation for graduate work, as is a writing sample. Applicants need not have an undergraduate major in psychology, but a strong interest in psychology and an interdisciplinary orientation is assumed. Students with insufficient background in psychology may be required by the EWP Admission Committee to take additional courses as prerequisites to the M.A. Successful candidates for admission into the EWP M.A. program typically have the following qualifications: a vision that is compatible with its mission, a path of personal and/or spiritual growth, sufficient maturity and stability to pursue independent inquiry, basic competence in communication and dialogical skills, demonstration of respect for a diversity of view points, the ability to clearly articulate their educational and professional goals, basic scholarly writing skills, and the capability to identify a prospective specialization that is consistent with the program's mission and resources. About PhD Program Students complete 36 units of coursework and write a dissertation. The program of study consists of a foundational course, research methods courses, research colloquia, advanced seminars, a student-designed area of specialization, two comprehensive exams, and a dissertation. Students focus on a specific area of study and develop methodological skills. They work closely with their advisors to design an individualized curriculum and participate in research colloquia to articulate their dissertation research project. Admission Applicants must meet the general admission requirements of the Institute, as well as have an MA in EWP or its equivalent (for example, a background in Humanistic, Jungian, or transpersonal psychology; psychology of religion, or religious studies). For those who do not have a background in East-West Psychology, up to 12 units of courses drawn from the EWP core requirements and directed electives will be required, minus equivalencies (equivalency for graduate courses previously taken is determined by the EWP Admissions Committee on an individual basis). In addition to the Institute's general admission requirements, two letters of recommendation are required from individuals familiar with the applicant's academic work and their preparation for graduate work. Applicants should also submit a sample of their writing (i.e., an outstanding essay, article, or selection from their M.A. thesis). Successful candidates for admission into the EWP Ph.D. program typically have the following qualifications: a vision that is compatible with the program's mission and interdisciplinary nature; a path of personal and/or spiritual growth; sufficient maturity and stability to pursue independent inquiry; competence of communication and dialectical skills; demonstration of respect for a diversity of viewpoints; an openness to multiple ways of knowing and whole-person learning; the ability to clearly articulate educational, professional, and research goals; outstanding scholarly writing skills; the ability to clearly articulate their educational and professional goals; and the capability to identify a prospective area of specialization and/or dissertation topic that is consistent with the program's mission and resources. [-]

Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion MA and PhD Programmes

Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

We live in the midst of one of the greatest transitions in Earth's history. Humanity, having become a planetary force, is now shaping both its own future and the long-term future of millions of species of life. [+]

Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion Programs The Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion program is cultivating hope in a time of socio-ecological crisis. We live in the midst of one of the greatest transitions in Earth's history. Humanity, having become a planetary force, is now shaping both its own future and the long-term future of millions of species of life. This decisive process occupies the most creative personalities of our time. One of the most significant recent developments is the engagement of our spiritual traditions in this transformation of consciousness and society. When the moral force of the world's religions combines with the depth understanding of ecology, humanity will find itself in the very center of that profoundly mysterious process by which the Earth Community is revitalizing itself. OUR MISSION Numerous interlocking ecological crises, including mass extinction of species, climate change, desertification, and poverty, mark the 21st century as a time of unprecedented change and challenge. This ecological devastation calls forth scientific, economic, and policy responses. Yet such standard responses often appear inadequate to the scope of the crisis. Many leading thinkers have come to understand that the ecological crisis represents a crisis of human consciousness, and requires fundamental revisioning of cultural values. The pace of global change calls for an understanding of the process by which humanity came to this crossroads in planetary history. It also calls for more enlightened ways of thinking and being in the world. The world's religious and spiritual traditions offer deep insight into the human condition, along with profound teachings about how humans should relate to one another and to Earthly life. Questions about the role and meaning of the human have illuminated religious quests for millennia; these same questions inspire the contemporary search for ecological sustainability. The concentration in Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion at CIIS is designed to help students to address these and related questions with rigor, insight, and efficacy. Taking inspiration from such visionaries as geologian Thomas Berry; His Holiness the Dalai Lama; systems theorist Joanna Macy; Nobel Laureate and Green Belt Movement founder Wangari Maathai; World Resources Institute founder Gus Speth; Forum on Religion and Ecology founders Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim; and many other leading thinkers, the Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion concentration invites students into an emerging discussion in which they will generate new knowledge, contributing to a growing field of academic inquiry and activism. Through the Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion concentration in the Philosophy and Religion department at CIIS, master's and doctoral students explore the role of worldviews, philosophies, and religion in understanding and responding to interconnected global ecological crises. They gain facility with ecological principles and practices. They develop the knowledge and wisdom to respond to the ecological devastation from healing integral and transdisciplinary perspectives. Students acquire skills and insight to transform practices, worldviews, and consciousness in service of a more just, sustainable, and flourishing future. The program's uniquely integrated curriculum explores such questions as: What is the role of religion, spirituality, and culture in the ecological crises of our time? What ecological insights does the world's religious heritage offer? How can explore worldviews help to understand and address ecological trauma? About the MA Program The MA in Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion emphasizes an embodied, engaged approach, in which contemplative practice and career exploration complement rigorous study. Students earning an MA in Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion will be at the forefront of an interdisciplinary field that has grown rapidly over the past decade. Graduates will be well prepared to engage environmental issues in multiple spheres, or to pursue doctoral-level study. Admission to the Program Applicants must meet the general admissions requirements of the Institute. ESR Master's students are motivated by their deep concern for the state of the Earth and their determination to find healing solutions for the future. Prospective students should be committed to examining ecological issues from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives, and to an appreciation of diverse perspectives. Applicants with a variety of backgrounds will be considered, provided the applicant possesses demonstrated interest in the subject matter of the concentration, and strong writing, analytical, and critical thinking skills developed during undergraduate study at an accredited institution The application materials required are an autobiography, a statement of goals (ideally several pages), a writing sample, and transcripts. About the PhD Program Interdisciplinary scholars wishing to engage in rigorous study of ecology and religion together will find the PhD program in Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion uniquely suited to their goals. Doctoral students study with faculty renowned for their cutting edge approaches to investigating the role of worldviews, philosophies, and religions in understanding and responding to global challenges. Admission to the Program Doctoral students wishing to specialize in Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion should possess a master's degree in a discipline relevant to the program (e.g. religion, ecology, environmental studies, biology, anthropology, environmental history, geography, literature, philosophy) from an accredited graduate institution. Applicants to the doctoral program should identify two core faculty members whose expertise closely matches the student's proposed course of study and research project. Doctoral applicants should demonstrate research preparation suggestive of their motivation to completing a doctoral dissertation. [-]

MA in Women, Gender, Spirituality, and Social Justice

Campus or Online Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

The MA in Women, Gender, Spirituality, and Social Justice (WGS) is a transdisciplinary program that prepares graduates to be change-makers who are guided by a sense of meaning, purpose, and vision. [+]

MA in Women, Gender, Spirituality, and Social Justice "I change myself, I change the world." -Gloria E. Anzaldua The MA in Women, Gender, Spirituality, and Social Justice (WGS) is a transdisciplinary program that prepares graduates to be change-makers who are guided by a sense of meaning, purpose, and vision. We are unique among academic programs that study women and gender in that we take seriously the realm of spirit. We bring current scholarship emerging from the fields of women/gender studies, ethnic studies, and related fields into dialogue with scholarship that addresses religion, spirituality, ecology, and healing. Graduates will develop skills that will enable them to either continue in doctoral work or craft careers in the non-profit sector, higher education, or socially conscious entrepreneurship. Distance Learning Program The Women's Spirituality Program recognizes that many qualified prospective students who might wish to earn a graduate degree cannot uproot from their homes and jobs to move to San Francisco. To support people in that situation, we offer our semi-distance learning option. This option is called "semi-distance" because students can live outside the Bay Area and still complete the MA in WGS or PhD in WSE by taking a combination of online and face-to-face courses. Students opting for Distance Learning must complete a minimum of 19 units face-to-face and a maximum of 17 units online to complete their degree. Apply to the Women’s Spirituality MA Program The Women, Gender, Spirituality and Social Justice master's degree is an interdisciplinary degree that integrates a number of fields in the humanities and social sciences. Applicants must meet the general admission requirements of the Institute and demonstrate the potential to be successful in this academically rigorous program. Successful candidates for admission into this MA program typically have the following qualifications: A vision that is compatible with the program's mission A commitment to personal and social transformation An ability to think critically and creatively Respect for a diversity of viewpoints Sufficient maturity and stability to pursue independent inquiry Scholarly writing skills [-]

Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology, Concentration in Integral Counseling Psychology

Campus Full time 2 - 3  January 2017 USA San Francisco

Drawing upon the major spiritual traditions of the East and West, recent cultural and social sciences research, and the innovations made by contemporary psychoanalytic, humanistic, systemic and transpersonal psychologies, we view psychological healing and growth within the larger context of spiritual unfolding. [+]

Integral Counseling Psychology Master's Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION This program is experiential, culturally sensitive, and centered on the inner work necessary for becoming a healer. Drawing upon the major spiritual traditions of the East and West, recent cultural and social sciences research, and the innovations made by contemporary psychoanalytic, humanistic, systemic and transpersonal psychologies, we view psychological healing and growth within the larger context of spiritual unfolding. Integral education is not "neck up." It will meet and stretch you on every level: body, heart, mind, spirit. We create a learning community that is both profoundly challenging and deeply supportive. WHY CIIS? Founded in 1973 on the recommendation of Dr. Haridas Chaudhuri, ICP was the first transpersonally-oriented, East-West psychology graduate program in the world. Because our education is so thorough, our students usually achieve the highest pass rates of all graduate degree programs of any significant size in California on the Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) exams. WEEKDAY COURSE Duration: 2.5 years Study mode: Full-time Starting: September or January WEEKEND COURSE Duration: 3 years Study mode: Full-time, 5 weekends per semester (Fri-Sun) Starting: September LEARNING OUTCOMES Earn a Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology Fulfill all academic requirements for Marriage and Family (MFT) licensure in the state of California.* Hone your clinical skills and professional expertise through practicums in CIIS' counseling centers or at a variety of external sites. Engage in transformative, integral, and transpersonal learning Apply to the Integral Counseling Psychology (MA) Program The program seeks individuals who: have some background or interest in spirituality (e.g., integral/East-West Philosophy) are pursuing a path of personal growth (e.g., yoga, meditation, psychotherapy) have demonstrated a capacity to learn and work both independently and collaboratively show a demonstrated commitment to the field (e.g., volunteer or paid experience in a psychologically-oriented community service agency) [-]

Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology, Concentration in Somatic Psychology

Campus Full time 2 - 3  September 2017 USA San Francisco

The Somatic Psychology concentration at California Institute of Integral Studies is one of three accredited academic programs in the United States that prepares students to use both conventional and body-oriented approaches to psychotherapy. [+]

Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology, Concentration in Somatic Psychology The Somatic Psychology concentration at California Institute of Integral Studies is one of three accredited academic programs in the United States that prepares students to use both conventional and body-oriented approaches to psychotherapy. Students participate in a vibrant academic community where learning includes both didactic and experiential practices leading to the ability to work with clients holistically and effectively. After completing the program and other Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) requirements for licensure, graduates are prepared to do counseling psychology in both private practice and agency settings. Since its inception in 1980, the Somatic Psychology program has developed a unique learning environment that combines experiential work, rigorous academics, research, and a deep commitment to community. Students in the Somatic Psychology program at CIIS learn a counseling approach that combines traditional practice and understanding with attention to the crucial role of the body in the structure and process of the psyche. The program teaches a developmental sociocultural perspective that explores how embodied affect, expression, identity, and interaction are formed both in families and in communities of participation outside of the family of origin. WHAT IS SOMATIC PSYCHOTHERAPY? Somatic Psychotherapies combine traditional approaches to counseling, including dream work, talk, interpretation, and reflection, with experiential explorations. The underlying insight in somatic psychotherapies is that we enact self-feeling, identity, and connection with others through bodily means. We reach out or pull away, are warm or cold to people, are emotional or restricted in our feelings. Through our development in families and communities, we construct embodied patterns of feeling, sensation, expression, movement, and emotion through which we know ourselves and make relationships in the world. Work, play, and other engagements with the world are also enacted through the development of varying muscular states, emotional and feeling capabilities, and ranges of movement. Somatic psychotherapists are trained to help clients explore the bodily means by which they conduct their daily lives. Through the use of breath work; movement exercises; touch; and explorations of feeling, sensation, posture, gesture, and expression, clients experience how they shape particular identities and interact with others. For Somatic psychotherapists these explorations of clients' patterns of bodily comportment and the explorations of new means of enactment are useful tools in the development of self-awareness and satisfaction in living. Somatic psychotherapies have been found to be particularly effective means of working with trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), dissociation, identity issues, and affect regulation. They are effective in both group and individual settings, and are especially useful as aids to self-reflection and the development of new ranges of affect, expression, and self-comportment. Students in the Somatic Psychology program at CIIS learn how to work with somatic approaches as well as learning traditional counseling practices. They become part of a community of scholar/practitioners engaged in developing new approaches to somatic psychotherapy and counseling. These new approaches include work with embodied cognition, understandings of complexity and diversity, and work within a variety of communities. LEARNING ENVIRONMENT In preparing students for practice, the Somatic Psychology program at CIIS stresses the importance of self-knowledge and self-development. We believe that practitioners need to have knowledge of their own responses, reactions, and senses of meaning as they work with others. This emphasis on personal exploration requires students to enter deeply into their own bodily experience, exploring experientially the capacity for empathy, feeling, and expression. They are also asked to examine the familial, social, and cultural roots of their experience. In this way, students work with the personal material they will bring to the therapeutic engagement. There is a strong emphasis on community in the Somatic Psychology program, and the experiential explorations of the program occur within a context of mutual self-inquiry. Attention is paid to group process and group learning. A program retreat begins the academic year, and there are semi-weekly community meetings in which students, faculty, and staff participate. The program also offers an environment of rigorous intellectual inquiry. Students are asked to develop a reflective approach to counseling psychology that includes skills in collaborative learning, knowledge of evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy, and a broad understanding of individual and family systems approaches to psychotherapy. Throughout the program, students write papers and present projects to hone their thinking, writing, and presentation skills. Faculty and students make presentations at national and international conferences concerned with body-oriented psychotherapy, the social sciences, and various aspects of somatics theory and practice. Under the leadership of Professor Don Hanlon Johnson, the program has undertaken a publishing program that has to date produced three books in the field in collaboration with North Atlantic Books: Bone, Breath and Gesture; Groundworks: Narratives of Embodiment; and The Body in Psychotherapy: Inquiries in Somatic Psychology. In the program's Center for the Study of the Body in Psychotherapy, Somatic Psychology program faculty and students have conducted research regarding sexual identities and enactments, multicultural understandings of identity and interaction, and early childhood approaches using somatic interventions with infants and parents. Students in the program have completed practicum training in a variety of settings including city government, homeless outreach programs, work in prisons, and work participation in various agencies dealing specifically with children's and women's issues and addictions. WESTERN AND NON-WESTERN TRADITIONS Reflecting the founding vision of CIIS, the Somatic Psychology program is defined by its unique integration of various Western and non-Western philosophic and spiritual traditions. This integral approach challenges the separation of body, mind, and spirit that has dominated Western psychotherapy. Course offerings explore the relation between bodily processes and states of consciousness, and foster a dialogue between spiritual approaches such as yoga, meditation, and chi gong, psychological approaches, and contemporary scientific understandings of the body. The Somatic Psychology program offers the following: Excellent training in psychotherapy that combines scholarship, best practices in counseling psychology, and experiential approaches to learning Learning counseling practices that include verbal and nonverbal work with body, mind, and spirit Grounding in psychodynamic, systems, developmental, and sociocultural approaches to psychotherapy Attention to diversity and opportunities to work in practicum with a wide range of populations A community of learning fostered by student retreats and community meetings A wide variety of practicum opportunities, including training at the program's Center for Somatic Psychotherapy ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM The Somatic Psychology program seeks highly motivated, creative, and mature students who have demonstrated a strong interest in work with somatic understandings. While this includes work in literature, humanities, and the social sciences, it is useful for prospective students to have had training in various somatic approaches, such as massage therapy, Feldenkrais, the Alexander technique, bioenergetics, Rosen work, massage, shiatsu, acupuncture, martial arts, dance, yoga, yoga therapy, or meditation. Given the experiential dimension of the program, it is necessary that applicants be emotionally stable. Students must be able to cope with both the strong feelings that often emerge from somatic experiential work and the rigors of intellectual work. [-]

Philosophy Cosmology and Consciousness MA and PhD Programme

Campus Full time September 2017 USA San Francisco

The Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness (PCC) graduate program is dedicated to re-imagining the human species as a mutually enhancing member of the Earth community. [+]

Philosophy Cosmology and Consciousness Program VOICE AND VISION The Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness (PCC) graduate program is dedicated to re-imagining the human species as a mutually enhancing member of the Earth community. PCC attracts intellectually engaged individuals who are in varying degrees dismayed by what they see happening in industrial societies and who are striving to find meaningful ways to develop their gifts to serve the future of the world. The program supports those called to meet the Earth community's unprecedented evolutionary challenge by offering students a rigorous and supportive learning community in which to find their voice and vision as leaders. Program Description Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness (PCC) is a graduate program dedicated to reimagining the human species as a mutually enhancing member of the Earth community. The heart of the PCC program is its focus on knowledge that is transformative--of ourselves and of our civilization. It attracts intellectually engaged individuals who are to varying degrees dismayed by what they see happening in industrial societies and who are striving to find meaningful ways to develop their gifts to serve the future of the world. Inspired by Alfred North Whitehead's view that the function of the university is to enable the future to appear, first in conceptual thought, the PCC faculty and graduate students hold in mind three fundamental goals: 1. To open our consciousness, through learning and imagination, to those creative and evolutionary energies suffusing the Earth, the Universe, and the deep psyche that will enable us to participate fully in the regeneration of human communities and their enveloping life systems; 2. To analyze the current devastation of planetary life and to strive to liberate ourselves and our communities from the underlying causes of alienation, consumerism, militarism, androcentrism, and unsustainable modes of life; 3. To draw from the deep wells of philosophical and religious wisdom together with other scholarly and scientific insights in order to bring forth a profound vision of a vibrant planetary era. Scientists, scholars, and visionaries recognize that the Earth community is facing an unprecedented evolutionary challenge, the most severe degradation of life in the last 65 million years. This multifaceted crisis requires a fundamental reorientation of our civilization, one in which a compassionate humanity becomes a mutually enhancing presence within Earth's complex systems of life. Cultural historian Thomas Berry has called this task "the Great Work." The PCC program is committed to shaping the leadership necessary for profound, progressive transformation of social institutions and individual consciousness. Drawing upon some of the most powerful ideas of Western intellectual and spiritual traditions, together with insights from Asian spiritual philosophies and indigenous worldviews, the faculty has constructed a multidisciplinary course of study to help accelerate each student's journey into his or her particular leadership role within this work: Philosophy: To free philosophy from its contemporary limitations-narrowly analytic, reductionist, and cosmologically alienated-and revive the original essence of Western philosophy as the love of wisdom. Philosophy in PCC explores new ways of thinking and being that are both visionary and pragmatic, and resist the paradigm of fragmentation that continues to dominate Western thought and culture. Cosmology: To pursue a multidisciplinary study of cosmology with a focus on the evolutionary unfolding of the Universe and the Earth community. Cosmology in PCC includes reflection on the discoveries of the natural sciences, as well as cosmological and ecological perspectives emerging in contemporary culture, including especially the arts and religion. Consciousness: To explore the worlds of consciousness and the deep psyche, particularly by research concerning archetypal structures and their formative expression in individual lives and culture. Consciousness studies in PCC focus on transpersonal and Jungian psychology, the evolution of consciousness, Western esotericism, and new paradigm studies. Integral Ecology: In the last several years, the PCC faculty and students have collaborated in creating a strong emphasis on integral ecology. The new Integral Ecology track focuses on ecology in the context of a multi- and transdisciplinary vision of philosophy, cosmology, and consciousness that characterizes the PCC program as a whole. The word integral implies that ecology is relevant to the full range of human knowledge and action. Integral Ecology includes the study of the natural and human sciences as well as the world's spiritual traditions. In the end, the perspectives studied and developed within the PCC community are tested in the fire of each student's experience. PCC offers students a challenging and supportive learning community in which to find their voice and vision as leaders. MASTER OF ARTS, PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION The PCC MA program seeks individuals who are drawn to the program's mission and goals, are open to multiple points of view, write well, and think critically. Admissions decisions are based on past academic achievement, maturity, and motivation for educational and personal development. The autobiographical statement should describe significant events in your life that have led to the decision to pursue admission to this program. The goal statement should articulate why you are interested in PCC in particular, and, if appropriate, how these interests relate to your long-term personal and professional aspirations. PCC will consider applicants from a variety of academic backgrounds, including the humanities, the social sciences, the natural sciences, the arts, or professional degree programs. INTERDISCIPLINARY CURRICULUM Our students pursue a one-of-a-kind interdisciplinary curriculum, taught by faculty who have established international reputations in such fields as cosmology, ecology and the evolution of consciousness. Studying the historical intersections of ideas in philosophy, science and religion, our master's candidates engage with both historical lessons and emerging theories. This broad intellectual foundation prepares our graduates to articulate the evolutionary challenges in our own "hinge time" in history. PCC inspires intense learning in many ways, from the annual retreat for students, faculty and alumni at Esalen Institute, to forums, symposia and conferences on such topics as The Cosmological Imagination. Our MA alumni have forged careers in permaculture, capacity-building for environmental and social change organizations, teaching and sustainable business education. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION Scholars who seek intellectual engagement in such pioneering fields as social ecology and capacity-building for environmental change, describe our PCC program as the only place to pursue their goals. Our uniquely interdisciplinary curriculum, taught by renowned faculty, stimulates both analysis and imagination. Studying the historical intersections of ideas in philosophy, science and religion, doctoral scholars prepare to teach, publish and take on activist roles in such areas as advocacy, sustainability, counseling and politics. Our program fosters visionary thinking and passionate debate, beginning with our annual retreat at the renowned Esalen Institute. Throughout the year forums, symposia and conferences complement PCC Podiums, where doctoral students who have finalized their dissertations make presentations. Ultimately we challenge students to develop the intellectual drive and personal initiative required to build a better world. The PCC faculty directs dissertations in two specializations: Integral Ecology and Cosmology, and Archetypal and Consciousness Studies. Admission to the Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness PhD program is increasingly selective. PhD admission is independent of admission to the MA program; it requires a separate application. An applicant for the PhD must have done outstanding work at the MA level. In addition, the PhD applicant must do the following: Identify at least one PCC core faculty member who would be appropriate to serve as a mentor in the PhD program and a second faculty member who would be able and willing to serve on the dissertation committee. Show close familiarity with that faculty member's particular area of expertise. Demonstrate the necessary preparation and motivation for specializing in that area (or areas), especially with respect to research leading to the dissertation. Students admitted into the doctoral concentration who do not have an MA from CIIS in Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness may be required to complete up to an additional 18 units of coursework (minus equivalencies) from the core section of the MA curriculum. [-]

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Contact

California Institute of Integral Studies

Address Mission Street 1453
94103 San Francisco, United States
Website http://www.ciis.edu/
Phone +1 415-575-6100