University of Westminster - Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities

Introduction

The Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities is based at our historic Regent Street building, in the heart of London’s West End and offers a dynamic and vibrant learning environment to inspire and excite the next generation of global citizens.

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From Languages to Criminology, Politics to History, English to Visual Culture, Sociology to Translation, we boast a diverse yet coherent range of academic activity. We are distinctive in combining academic rigour with practical application, and we take pride in our 180-year history of offering ‘education for all’. Our staff are internationally known for their research and for sharing their expertise and passion with our students and other partners so as to meet the challenges of our times and to make the world we live in a better place.

We provide numerous opportunities for students to study abroad, to learn foreign languages and to combine academic studies with work experience through placements and internships.

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Social Sciences and Humanities here at Westminster is at the forefront of learning by any measure. We boast courses with 100% student satisfaction and disciplines whose research is amongst the highest rated in the country. We are a faculty in the heart of London, proud of our diversity, cosmopolitanism and internationalism.

ABOUT THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTMINSTER

The University of Westminster was founded as Britain's first polytechnic in 1838. Since then it has developed into a university that combines both metropolitan and cosmopolitan dimensions, and which is closely involved in business, professional and academic life within London, as well as overseas.

The University has a strong and historic commitment to promoting equality and embracing diversity. We strive to strengthen our reputation as a welcoming and inclusive organisation.

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OUR INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION

As a global university located in a world city, we are home to over 5,000 students and 500 staff from overseas.

Westminster has a reputation for excellence in professionally relevant teaching and learning and for high quality research. We place particular emphasis on providing international opportunities for Westminster students in order to ensure that we provide an environment where students can develop skills, competences and knowledge required by the global economy.

We are proud of our long history of global relationships and have partnerships across the world – connections we continually strive to strengthen and deepen.

Our world-leading research, produced in partnership with global industry and educational institutions, has a real impact in the world around us.

THE UNIVERSITY’S HERITAGE

A place for pioneers

The Westminster story began in 1838, when Sir George Cayley opened the Polytechnic Institution at 309 Regent Street in London. In 1881, philanthropist Quintin Hogg, bought the Royal Polytechnic Institution building and moved his Young Men’s Christian Institute into 309 Regent Street, which soon became the publicly funded Regent Street Polytechnic.

Since then, our education institution has secured a reputation as a place for firsts. These include:

  • the first polytechnic in the UK (1838)
  • the opening of the first public photographic portrait studio in Europe (1841)
  • the venue for the first public moving picture show in the UK, organised by the Lumiere brothers (1896)
  • the first modern university to win the Queen’s Award for Enterprise – International Trade
  • the UK’s first Partner University for UN Habitat, the agency which deals with human settlement and development.
This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programmes

This school also offers:

MA

MA Art and Visual Culture

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. The course introduces you to a range of historical and contemporary debates that inform the theories and practice of visual culture, and enables you to develop a conceptual framework within which to evaluate the role... [+]

This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. The course introduces you to a range of historical and contemporary debates that inform the theories and practice of visual culture, and enables you to develop a conceptual framework within which to evaluate the role of the visual arts, and other forms of visual production, in contemporary society and culture. You will acquire creative and professional research skills, such as the ability to work from exhibitions, art works and institutional archives, to be able to operate within different artistic and conceptual frameworks. Course content This Masters balances historical and theoretical debates in the field of visual culture studies with a rigorous interrogation of cultural practices across a range of topics, including: activism and popular politics; contemporary visual arts, capitalism and culture; globalisation and new media technologies; institutions and their archives; and the material culture of the city. The course also draws upon the cultural institutions and intellectual resources of central London, and has established contacts with other galleries and organisations for work placements. Core modules DISSERTATION This extended piece of research work is an opportunity for you to pursue a topic of individual interest, and is conducted through individual study and directed supervision. The module also includes preparation of a detailed research proposal. RESEARCH METHODS: KNOWLEDGE, CULTURAL MEMORY, ARCHIVES AND RESEARCH This introduction to research methods engages with the critical implications of knowledge in the humanities, through interdisciplinary approaches to literature, visual, material, and spatial cultures, as they are understood, interpreted, and mobilised. Highlighting questions raised by discourse on epistemology, memory, archives, and research itself, the module concentrates on the complex links between: organic and technical forms of memory; public and private cultural institutions of knowledge, memory and identity; and information-gathering, retrieval, and analysis. THEORETICAL AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES This module introduces you to the theoretical debates that have contributed to the field of visual culture studies, including consideration of the politics of representation, the reproduction of images, audience reception, the male and female gaze, and the discourse of the 'other'. You will also focus on an examination of the ways that theories and objects constitute each other. VISUAL CULTURE: PRODUCTION DISPLAY AND DISCOURSE This module provides an introduction to the history and theory of visual culture. Philosophical and theoretical perspectives are used to explore vision as a social and cultural process, investigating the ways in which the meanings of the 'seen' are explored, constructed and contested in construction, display and discourse. Course-specific entry requirements You should have a good first degree in a relevant area, such as history of art, cultural studies, fine art or design, English, history, media and communications, architecture and business studies. You may be invited for interview, or to submit previous written work. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 with 7.0 in writing (or Equivalent), and will be asked to provide exampled of previous written work. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course. Associated careers Graduates will be equipped for roles in the creative industries, including museum and gallery work, education, arts administration and marketing, or could pursue further study to PhD level. The course is also suitable for practising artists wishing to further their research. [-]

MA Creative Writing: Writing the City

Campus Full time January 2017 United Kingdom London

This Creative Writing: Writing the City Masters course is the first to focus entirely on the city of London. It will allow you to explore the city as subject matter from a range of perspectives and across all genres. It will also give you a theoretical and practical platform from which to develop your understanding, and become part of the London writing scene. [+]

This Creative Writing: Writing the City Masters course is the first to focus entirely on the city of London. It will allow you to explore the city as subject matter from a range of perspectives and across all genres. It will also give you a theoretical and practical platform from which to develop your understanding, and become part of the London writing scene. Taught by professional writers and researchers, the course offers plenty of opportunities to network with other writers, agents, TV producers and performance poets. You will be based in the University's headquarters building at 309 Regent Street, which means you will be writing about the city in the heart of London, with ready access to the capital's excellent academic, social and cultural opportunities, including the vibrant West End theatre scene. Course content If studying full-time, you will normally take three modules in Semester One and tree modules in Semester Two. You can begin in January or in September. Part-time students take two modules in each semester. The availability of option modules will depend on overall demand and staff availability, but you will normally told which options are on offer at the beginning of your course. You can choose one 'free choice' option module from other Master courses at Westminster, subject to timetabling constraints and the approval of the project during the first semester an submit it after all other modules have been attempted. To receive your Masters award, you will need to complete taught modules for a total of 120 credits, and the 60-credit Writing Project (giving a total of 180 credits). If you do not meet the requirements for a Masters award, you will be eligible for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma or a Postgraduate Certificate. The workshop-based structure of the course will allow you to learn through interactive practice. Modules are taught by one two-hour or tree-hour seminar/workshop per week, depending on your subject. Teaching will also include visits to selected London institution to support certain aspects of writing, and you will be encourage to use various archives, theatres and galleries. Assessment methods include coursework portfolios (allowing you to experiment in a variety of genres, reflective logs, essays, and workshop leadership) as well as the 10-12,000-word writing project. There are no formal examinations. Core modules CONFLICT AND THE CITY (DRAMA) This module focuses on the craft of playwriting, with a particular emphasis on drama that exploits the possibilities of the urban environment. You will draft a dramatic work of 60-90 minutes, critique the work of experienced dramatists and develop a shared vocabulary of 'technical' terminology. It will also introduce you to major new-writing opportunities in London and beyond. While contextualising new playwriting within the wider parameters of 20th and early 21st century drama, the module will encourage you to reflect in depth on your own writing and develop an advanced understanding of the elements of a dramatic text, including characterisation, structure, conflict, dramatic irony and subtext. LANGUAGE AND THE IMAGINATION (POETIC WRITING) You will develop your use of poetic language through a combination of short exercises, close reading of poetry and prose poetry, and critiques of your own work. You will gain a sophisticated understanding of poetic language and its applications to a range of other genres, and enhance your ability to identify imaginative uses of language as a writer and reader of poetry on the city. The module will allow you to develop an advanced understanding of formal poetic structures and of the publishing and performance opportunities for poetry in London. TALES OF THE CITY (FICTION) This module focuses on Friction Writing inspired by the city. Through a combination of exercises, close reading of established authors and critiques of your own work, you will be challenged to raise your own prose writing to a professional level. As it establishes your understanding of prose fiction and treating the city as a primary source or background presence, the module will nurture your potential to be an innovative and independent writer. You will also examine approaches to writing short and longer prose fiction that either overtly takes the city as its theme or employs it as a significant presence. CREATIVE PRACTICE This module will develop your understanding of the aesthetic, ethical and methodological choices that underpin writing practice. You will learn how to evaluate different theories of writing (including realist, modernist and postmodernist approaches), while widening your knowledge of associated literary styles and practices such as stream of consciousness writing, automatic writing, writing as representation and visual writing. The module will also introduce you to the ways in which place, in particular the urban environment, affects writing and encourage you to interrogate the ethical and political dilemmas arising from literary production. HOW TO WRITE CREATIVELY : PORTFOLIO (JANUARY STARTERS) This module focuses on developing your creative writing skills using a variety of exercises and techniques. The module will allow you to develop a portfolio of creative writing inspired by the city through a combination of practical workshops and close reading of established authors. You will also learn to critique their work, while being challenged to raise your own writing to professional level. THE WRITING BUSINESS (YEAR-LONG) The module focuses on the development of knowledge, personal and professional skills that will allow you to plan our professional development, with a particular emphasis on the writing business in London. Providing useful and relevant information about working in the creative industries through visiting speakers and workshops, the module aims to develop and nurture advanced and transferable entrepreneurial skills and allow you to network with other professionals with confidence. THE WRITING PROJECT You will focus on one substantial piece of creative work or portfolio of smaller pieces, with a view to submission for publication. The module aims to provide the support needed for you to prepare a substantial piece of creative writing and develop your individual voice in the genre of your choice. As the module seeks to synthesise the discoveries about the city made during the course, and help you to respond appropriately in your creative work, it will allow you to absorb and process your explorations of the city, and respond through your creative work. Course-specific entry requirements You are normally required to have a good first degree or equivalent in a humanities-based subject; successful applicants will be expected to have a proven interest in, and commitment to, language and its creative outlets. Candidates without formal qualifications will also be considered on the basis of their professional achievements in relevant areas of the creative industry (theatre, performance, journalism, publishing, etc). If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0 overall with at least 6 in each element. You will also need to give two academic references and submit a portfolio of creative writing, which should not exclusively include poetry. Selected candidates will be invited for an interview. Associated careers The course will enable you to develop sophisticated critical and creative skills and a widely applicable knowledge base that can be adapted to various fields of creative practice and writing business. This course is intended to move you to a new level in your career as a writer by developing your skills as a sophisticated critical practitioner, and your knowledge of literature about the city as well as the writing business. You will be encouraged to network with other writers and identify useful opportunities for career development, partly through the wide range of extra-curricular activities, including writers' events and talks. The critical and practical skills you will acquire by the end of the course will make you a strong candidate in many areas, including arts management, copy editing, education, freelance writing, journalism, media, publishing, theatre and performance-based writing, and research and academia. [-]

MA Cultural and Critical Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This interdisciplinary course offers you the rare opportunity to study contemporary critical and cultural debates across a wide range of fields. Exploring a variety of different visual, textual and spatial forms of culture, and their diverse theorisations, the course will particularly appeal to those with wide-ranging interests in the arts and humanities, as well as those interested in cutting-edge theoretical debates. [+]

This interdisciplinary course offers you the rare opportunity to study contemporary critical and cultural debates across a wide range of fields. Exploring a variety of different visual, textual and spatial forms of culture, and their diverse theorisations, the course will particularly appeal to those with wide-ranging interests in the arts and humanities, as well as those interested in cutting-edge theoretical debates. Modules are taught by expert staff from a number of different disciplines, giving you the chance to follow particular themes in the areas that most interest you. Recent work by staff in Cultural and Critical Studies includes books and articles on new media, urban theory, gender, contemporary art and aesthetics, Victorian criminality, China, visual culture, architecture, post-colonialism and critical theory. Course content The course consists of two main core modules, Capitalism and Culture, and Problems and Perspectives in Cultural Studies. These establish a framework for the close analysis of the locations, products and systems of culture. The dissertation of 10-12,000 words, which can be written on an appropriate topic of your choice, and the Research Methods module are also core modules. There is also an optional work placement module. You are encouraged to attend the research seminars in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, at which visiting speakers, creative practitioners and teaching staff present their current work. Core modules CAPITALISM AND CULTURE Beginning with Marx's famous account of the commodity in the first chapter of Capital, this module explores a range of theoretical accounts of capitalism and examines their significance to the analysis of different cultural forms, including film, literature, and the contemporary visual arts. In doing so, you will consider changing conceptions of 'culture' itself, and its varying relations to ideas of art, modernity, production, the mass, autonomy, spectacle, and the culture industry. Key theorists you will study include Theodor Adorno, Jean Baudrillard, Walter Benjamin, Guy Debord, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Fredric Jameson, and Antonio Negri. DISSERTATION This extended piece of research work is an opportunity for you to pursue a topic of individual interest, and is conducted through individual study and directed supervision. The module also includes preparation of a detailed research proposal. PROBLEMS AND PERSPECTIVES IN CULTURAL STUDIES This module provides you with a critical introduction to contemporary cultural studies through analysis of the major approaches underlying the interdisciplinary, cross-cultural study of society. It is built around readings of the most influential theorists in the field, and key themes you will cover include: class and ethnicity in cultural studies; discourse and practice in cultural studies; gender, media and aesthetics; performance, ritual and representation in the language of culture; place, identity and voice; and shifting identities in the public spheres of multi-culturalist, transnationalist and global movements. The module concludes with an examination of the possibilities of 'decolonising' cultural studies from its traditional Eurocentric perspectives. RESEARCH METHODS: KNOWLEDGE, CULTURAL MEMORY, ARCHIVES AND RESEARCH This introduction to research methods engages with the critical implications of knowledge in the humanities, through interdisciplinary approaches to literature, visual, material, and spatial cultures, as they are understood, interpreted, and mobilised. Highlighting questions raised by discourse on epistemology, memory, archives, and research itself, the module concentrates on the complex links between: organic and technical forms of memory; public and private cultural institutions of knowledge, memory and identity; and informationgathering, retrieval, and analysis. Course-specific entry requirements You are normally required to have a good first degree or equivalent in a relevant subject. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 or equivalent. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course. Associated careers The course is intended to give you sophisticated critical skills and a widely applicable knowledge of contemporary culture. This enables further study at MPhil or PhD levels, but is also particularly relevant to a range of professions in the media, creative and cultural industries. [-]

MA Energy and Environmental Change

Campus Full time January 2017 United Kingdom London

The Energy and Environmental Change MA is an interdisciplinary degree that combines international relations, law, business and sustainability studies. As such it provides a comprehensive examination of energy security, energy markets and climate change from global, regional and local perspectives. [+]

The Energy and Environmental Change MA is an interdisciplinary degree that combines international relations, law, business and sustainability studies. As such it provides a comprehensive examination of energy security, energy markets and climate change from global, regional and local perspectives. The degree equips students with knowledge of key intellectual frameworks and critical issues. The course offers an holistic approach to the dynamics governing energy-transition to a low-carbon economy nexus. Students are required to complete five interconnected core modules and may select one option module. The course combines expertise from: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities Westminster Business School Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment The course is delivered in full-time and part-time mode with either September or January intake. Core modules GLOBAL POLITICS OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE This module aims at evaluating the relevance of contemporary debates in international relations and political economy to the study of energy security, energy markets and climate change. It examines the political history of the modern energy systems and the role played by states and major private and state-owned companies. In addition, it explores the role of global institutions and their impact on the interplay between energy security, energy markets and climate change. It scrutinises issues that underpin key discussions in the energy and climate change area, such as development, limits to growth, transparency, sustainability and the role of civil society. The module also critically assesses standard approaches to the issue of energy security by focusing on the problem of energy poverty and resilience. REGIONAL DIMENSIONS OF ENERGY SECURITY Since the 2000s the global energy landscape that took shape in the last two decades of the twentieth century has been altered due to major geo-political and geo-economical shifts, the rise of new players in the energy sector and technological breakthroughs. The aim of this module is to analyse the impact that these developments had on the energy security of key producing and consuming countries. It will analyse these problems by focusing on change and continuity in the decision-making processes of state and non-state actors. Countries covered include the US, the EU, the Asian rising powers, Russia and specific case studies from the Middle East, Central Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AND CLIMATE CHANGE LAW This module is designed to introduce students to the principles of international law relevant to the development and use of energy resources. To this end, the course examines the evolution of principles relating to permanent sovereignty over natural resources, 'shared' resources and resources outside areas of national jurisdiction. It involves consideration of relevant international legal principles pertaining to oil and gas resources, the use of water resources in energy generation, renewables and nuclear energy. The course has particular regard to the evolving international legal framework on the mitigation of climate change, and its impact on international energy law and policy. The course also examines the impact of other principles of international law on the energy sector, such as relevant principles of international environmental law, foreign investment and trade law, and human rights. STRATEGY AND POLICY: ENERGY AND SUSTAINABILITY The focus of this module is on energy economics and, in particular, on the role of markets in driving energy policy and strategy in both the short and long term. It covers a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to energy demand, energy supply and energy prices, the influence of fiscal instruments on market operation and the importance of banks and financial institutions for the funding of energy projects. The first half of the module will explore a number of key themes and conceptual issues. These will include: an analysis of the structure and operation of oil, gas, coal, electricity and renewables markets and issues of price discovery, carbon trading, green taxes and subsidies; the role of banks and alternative sources of financing for oil and gas projects; an exploration of approaches to modelling and forecasting the supply, demand and price of energy and energy derivatives. The second half of the module will have a practical focus, with sessions led by guest speakers drawn from a range of energy companies, renewables firms or from policy 'think-tanks'. These will take the form of short participative workshops exploring case studies on energy strategy and sustainability. ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE AND TRANSITION TO A LOW-CARBON SOCIETY This module introduces a framework for analysing and shaping the transition to a low-carbon society. Core ideas are transformative innovation, sociotechnical systems and sustainability transitions. They are explored in relation to key end use arenas of the energy system – buildings, transport and local energy networks. Attention is given to the multilevel governance and policy aspects of sociotechnical transition. Admissions requirements A good honours degree, namely a first class or upper second honours degree or equivalent in a social science discipline (politics, law, geography, history, sociology, development studies) or economics or business studies. Applicants whose first language is not English will be required to provide proof of competence in English. This will normally take the form of an IELTS score of at least 6.5. Applications need to be supported by either an academic reference written on the University letter-head or, in the case of candidates in employment, by a reference from the most recent employer familiar with the applicant's abilities and other qualities. Candidates will be admitted on the basis of an application accompanied by documentary evidence of meeting the above requirements. In some cases it may be necessary for the Course Leader to interview potential students either in person or by telephone or Skype. Applications from mid-career candidates are welcomed. The candidates are not expected to have prior experience in the energy or related sectors. [-]

MA English Language and Creative Writing

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  January 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The English Language and Creative Writing MA allows you to explore the interconnections between your knowledge of how language is used and produced, and your literary compositions. [+]

The English Language and Creative Writing MA allows you to explore the interconnections between your knowledge of how language is used and produced, and your literary compositions. It will provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives (theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic), as well as leading you to explore the writing process across genres and to take the city of London as one of your main sources of inspiration. The MA will equip you with the intellectual perspectives and the scholarly skills that will prepare you to conduct independent research, and will offer you many opportunities to network with other writers, agents, TV producers and performance poets. Course content The English Language and Creative Writing MA is suitable for students who have taken English language, literature and/or creative writing modules at undergraduate level, and others with experience in these fields. It is of particular interest to those wishing to pursue further study, and those aiming to apply their knowledge of language and the writing process in their careers. If pursuing the degree full-time, you will study 180 credits in one academic year; if part-time, you will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. You will study three or four core modules (including a 60-credit dissertation on a topic of English language or a creative writing project), as well as two modules from the list of options. The core module English Language in Use will help you acquire the scholarly tools necessary for the stylistic interpretation of literary and non-literary texts, while the modules Tales of the City and Conflict and the City invite you to explore the writing process in connection with prose and dramatic texts. The teaching is mainly through weekly two- or three-hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will be prepared for the Dissertation via structured sessions in research methodology. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, reviews and exercises; there are no formal examinations. Core modules DISSERTATION The Dissertation gives you the opportunity to conduct autonomous work with supervisory support on a topic you feel passionate about. At the beginning of the module you will have a series of practical seminars on the different issues involved in the process of writing a dissertation, such as finding a topic, the role of the supervisor, research methodology and the conventions of academic writing. ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN USE: TIME, TEXTS AND CONTEXTS In this module you will study English historical linguistics and stylistics, literary linguistics and cognitive poetics. Thus, you will gain a good knowledge of the ways in which the language has changed overtime and the stylistic effects of particular linguistic choices, as well as an in-depth understanding of the theoretical frameworks that can be used to describe the interaction between language and literature. TALES OF THE CITY (PROSE WRITING)(SEPTEMBER STARTERS) This module focuses on developing skills at writing prose fiction inspired by the city through a combination of exercises, close reading of established authors and critiques of your own work, as you are challenged to raise your own prose writing to a professional level. As it establishes your understanding of prose fiction and treating the city as a primary source or background presence, the module will nurture your potential to be an innovative and independent writer. You will also examine approaches to writing short and longer prose fiction that either overtly takes the city as its theme or employs it as a significant presence. LANGUAGE AND THE IMAGINATION You will develop your use of poetic language through a combination of short exercises, close reading of poetry, and critiques of your own work. You will gain a sophisticated understanding of poetic language and its applications to a range of other genres, and enhance your ability to identify imaginative uses of language as a writer and reader of poetry on the city of London. The module will allow you to develop an advanced understanding of formal poetic structures and of the publishing and performance opportunities for poetry in London. TALES OF THE CITY This module focuses on developing skills at writing prose fiction inspired by the city of London through a combination of exercises, close reading of established authors and critiques of your own work, as you are challenged to raise your own prose writing to a professional level. As it establishes your understanding of prose fiction and treating the city as a primary source or background presence, the module will nurture your potential to be an innovative and independent writer. You will also examine approaches to writing short and longer prose fiction that either overtly takes the city as its theme or employs it as a significant presence. CONFLICT AND THE CITY (WRITING DRAMA)(SEPTEMBER STARTERS) This module focuses on the craft of playwriting, with a particular emphasis on drama that exploits the possibilities of the urban environment. You will draft a dramatic work of 60-90 minutes, critique the work of experienced dramatists and develop a shared vocabulary of 'technical' terminology. It will also introduce you to major new writing opportunities in London and beyond. While contextualising new playwriting within the wider parameters of 20th and early 21st-century drama, the module will encourage you to reflect in depth on your own writing and develop an advanced understanding of the elements of a dramatic text, including characterisation, structure, conflict, dramatic irony and subtext. PORTFOLIO (JANUARY STARTERS) This module will develop your creative writing skills using a variety of exercises and techniques. It will allow you to put together a portfolio of creative writing inspired by the city through a combination of practical workshops and close reading of established authors. You will also learn to critique your own work, while being challenged to raise your own writing to professional level. Course-specific entry requirements Applicants are normally required to have a good first degree (2.1 or above) or equivalent experience in a relevant subject (eg English language, linguistics , or TESOL). Students whose first language is not English must have an IELTS certificate with an overall score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component, or be able to demonstrate an equivalent level of proficiency. Applicants will be required to submit two academic references, and a 10,000-word portfolio of creative writing; they may be invited to an interview (either face to face or via Skype). Applications from candidates without a first degree in a relevant subject are also welcomed. These applicants can submit professional or academic references. Teaching and assessment Teaching is conducted mainly through weekly two or three hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. Teaching will also include visits to selected London institutions to support certain aspects of writing, and you will be encouraged to use various archives, galleries, etc. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will receive one-to-one advice for your dissertation or writing project. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, projects, reports or reflective logs. There are no timed written examinations. Research The Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies at the University of Westminster boasts a long established research culture in literature and linguistics. Its commitment to the study of language and its interaction with literature, both from a theoretical and an applied perspective, has led to its more recent expansion of the English language and creative writing areas and the appointment of internationally renowned experts in these fields. Associated careers The course will enable you to develop sophisticated critical and creative skills and a widely applicable knowledge base that can be adapted to various fields of language use and study, creative practice and writing business. This course is intended to move you to a new level in your career as a writer by developing your skills as a sophisticated critical practitioner, and your knowledge of literature about the city as well as the writing business. You will be encouraged to network with other writers and identify useful opportunities for career development, partly through the wide range of extra-curricular activities, including writers' events and talks, and partly through the workshops organised by the departmental employability coordinator. The critical and practical skills you will acquire by the end of the course will make you a strong candidate in many areas, including arts management, copy editing, education, freelance writing, journalism, media, publishing, research and academia. [-]

MA English Language and Linguistics

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  January 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The English Language and Linguistics MA aims to provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives: theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic. [+]

The English Language and Linguistics MA aims to provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives: theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic. It will enable you to understand and evaluate critically a wide spectrum of ideas put forward in the study of the English language (particularly in connection with linguistic variation in terms of space, time, communicative context and linguistic contact) and will equip you with the intellectual perspectives and the scholarly skills that will prepare you to conduct independent research. Course content The English Language and Linguistics MA is suitable for students who have taken English language and/or linguistics modules at undergraduate level, and others who have taken allied disciplines such as psychology, philosophy or TESOL. It is of particular interest to those wishing to pursue further study and those teaching English who wish to gain a further qualification and investigate recent and current developments in the field. If pursuing the degree full-time, you will study 180 credits in one academic year; if part-time, you will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. You will study three core modules (including a 60-credit dissertation on a topic of English language and/or linguistics), as well as two modules from the list of options. The core modules English Language in Use and English Worldwide examine linguistic variation from a wide range of perspectives and many of the options complement this approach. You can explore TESOL issues as part of your options. The teaching is mainly through weekly two- or three-hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will be prepared for the Dissertation via structured sessions in research methodology. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, reviews and exercises; there are no formal examinations. Core modules DISSERTATION The Dissertation gives you the opportunity to conduct autonomous work with supervisory support on a topic you feel passionate about. At the beginning of the module you will have a series of practical seminars on the different issues involved in the process of writing a dissertation, such as finding a topic, the role of the supervisor, research methodology and the conventions of academic writing. ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN USE: TIME, TEXTS AND CONTEXTS In this module you will study English historical linguistics and stylistics, literary linguistics and cognitive poetics. Thus, you will gain a good knowledge of the ways in which the language has changed overtime and the stylistic effects of particular linguistic choices, as well as an in-depth understanding of the theoretical frameworks that can be used to describe the interaction between language and literature. ENGLISH WORLDWIDE This module explores the interaction between the English language and other languages throughout the world, examining such varied but closely interrelated topics as world varieties of English, creole linguistics, multilingualism, intercultural pragmatics, and London English. Course-specific entry requirements Applicants are normally required to have a good first degree (2. 1 or above) or equivalent experience in a relevant subject (eg English language, linguistics or TESOL). Students whose first language is not English must have an IELTS certificate with an overall score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component, or be able to demonstrate an equivalent level of proficiency. Applicants will also be required to submit two academic references and they may be invited to an interview (either face to face or via Skype). Applications from candidates without a first degree in a relevant subject are also welcomed. These applicants can submit professional or academic references. Teaching and assessment Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, projects or reports. There are no timed written examinations. Research The Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies at the University of Westminster boasts a long established research culture in linguistics, with international reputation in the fields of creole linguistics, phonetics and syntax. More recently, the Department has also developed the English language and creative writing areas, appointing internationally renowned experts in these fields. Work on the English language focuses broadly on its history, its presence worldwide, multilingualism, stylistics, discourse analysis, semantics, translation and TESOL. Associated careers The English Language and Linguistics MA will provide you with sophisticated analytical skills and a widely applicable knowledge base, which will enable you to study at MPhil or PhD levels with a view to pursuing an academic career. The course is also particularly relevant to teaching English as a first or foreign language, and to a range of professions involving language and communication. While studying the MA, you will also benefit from the careers workshops organised by the departmental employability coordinator. [-]

MA English Language and Literature

Campus Full time January 2017 United Kingdom London

The English Language and Literature MA aims to allow you to explore the interconnections between language and literature. It will provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives (theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic), as well as leading you to explore a wide array of texts in connection with the social, historical and... [+]

The English Language and Literature MA aims to allow you to explore the interconnections between language and literature. It will provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives (theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic), as well as leading you to explore a wide array of texts in connection with the social, historical and political circumstances from which they emerge. Furthermore, the MA will equip you with the intellectual perspectives and the scholarly skills that will prepare you to conduct independent research. Course content The MA is suitable for students who have taken English language and/or literature modules at undergraduate level, and others who have taken allied disciplines such as TESOL. It is of particular interest to those wishing to pursue further study and those teaching English who wish to gain a further qualification and investigate recent and current developments in the field. If pursuing the degree full-time, you will study 180 credits in one academic year; if part-time, you will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. You will study four core modules (including a 60-credit dissertation on a topic of English language and/or literature), as well as two modules from the list of options. The core modules Subjectivities: Modern and Contemporary Fictions and Institutions and Histories examine classic and contemporary critical texts on literature in relation to ideas in larger contexts, such as history, the visual image, gender, psychoanalysis and post- colonialism, while the module English Language in Use will help you acquire the scholarly tools necessary for the stylistic interpretation of literary and non-literary texts. The teaching is mainly through weekly two or three hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will be prepared for the Dissertation via structured sessions in research methodology. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, reviews and exercises; there are no formal examinations. Core modules DISSERTATION The Dissertation gives you the opportunity to conduct autonomous work with supervisory support on a topic you feel passionate about. At the beginning of the module you will have a series of practical seminars on the different issues involved in the process of writing a dissertation, such as finding a topic, the role of the supervisor, research methodology and the conventions of academic writing. ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN USE: TIME, TEXTS AND CONTEXTS In this module you will study English historical linguistics and stylistics, literary linguistics and cognitive poetics. Thus, you will gain a good knowledge of the ways in which the language has changed overtime and the stylistic effects of particular linguistic choices, as well as an in-depth understanding of the theoretical frameworks that can be used to describe the interaction between language and literature. INSTITUTIONS AND HISTORIES IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY FICTIONS In this module you will examine a range of topics, including genre and history, literature’s contemporary globalisation, the historical development of English Literature as a discipline, the history and theorisation of the very notion of literature itself, and the material cultures of literary production and consumption. SUBJECTIVITIES IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY FICTIONS This module focuses on the themes of reading and re-reading. You will explore different critical approaches, such as feminism and deconstruction, as well as looking at key issues in literary studies such as the author and the reader. Associated careers The English Language and Literature MA will provide you with sophisticated analytical skills and a widely applicable knowledge base, which will enable you to study at MPhil or PhD levels with a view to pursuing an academic career. The course is also particularly relevant to teaching English as a first or foreign language, and to a range of professions involving the study and use of language and literary texts. While studying the MA, you will also benefit from the careers workshops organised by the departmental employability coordinator. Course-specific entry requirements Applicants are normally required to have a good first degree (2.1 or above) or equivalent experience in a relevant subject (eg English language, English literature or TESOL). Students whose first language is not English must have an IELTS certificate with an overall score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component, or be able to demonstrate an equivalent level of proficiency. Applicants will be required to submit two academic references, and they may be invited to an interview (either face to face or via Skype) and/or to submit a 1,500-word essay. Applications from candidates without a first degree in a relevant subject are also welcomed. These applicants can submit professional or academic references. [-]

MA English Literature: Modern and Contemporary Fictions

Campus Full time January 2017 United Kingdom London

This course gives you the chance to study English literature in a modern university environment, while taking advantage of the wealth of resources offered by London's rich cultural life. You will examine literary texts in the wider context of cultural production and relate them to the social, historical and political circumstances from which they emerge. [+]

This course gives you the chance to study English literature in a modern university environment, while taking advantage of the wealth of resources offered by London's rich cultural life. You will examine literary texts in the wider context of cultural production and relate them to the social, historical and political circumstances from which they emerge. The course team consists of academic specialists who make use of the many nearby museums, galleries and libraries in their teaching. The course will be of particular interest to those wishing to prepare for further study at MPhil or PhD level, and those teaching English who want to gain a further qualification and investigate recent and current developments in the field. Course content The course is organised around the themes of reading, re-reading and interpretation. You will study a range of periods and issues in literature, to place literary texts in cultural contexts and to understand them within the critical history of literature. The core modules, Subjects: Modern and Contemporary Fictions and Institutions and Histories: Modern and Contemporary Fictions, are comprised of an examination of classic and contemporary critical texts on literature in relation to ideas in larger contexts, such as history, the visual image, gender, psychoanalysis and post-colonialism. The Dissertation of 10-12,000 words, which can be written on an appropriate topic of your choice, and Research Methods are also core modules. Modules The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course. For more details on course structure and modules, and how you will be taught and assessed, see the full course document. Core modules DISSERTATION This extended piece of research work is an opportunity for you to pursue a topic of individual interest, and is conducted through individual study and directed supervision. The module also includes preparation of a detailed research proposal. INSTITUTIONS AND HISTORIES This module focuses on the themes of reading and re-reading. An independent module, it is also designed to give you the opportunity for preparatory discussion of topics in optional modules. You will examine a range of topics, including: genre and history; literature's contemporary globalisation; the historical development of English Literature as a discipline; the history and theorisation of the very notion 'literature' itself; and the material cultures of literary production and consumption. RESEARCH METHODS: KNOWLEDGE, CULTURAL MEMORY, ARCHIVES AND RESEARCH This introduction to research methods engages with the critical implications of knowledge in the humanities, through interdisciplinary approaches to literature, visual, material, and spatial cultures, as they are understood, interpreted, and mobilised. Highlighting questions raised by discourse on epistemology, memory, archives, and research itself, the module concentrates on the complex links between: organic and technical forms of memory; public and private cultural institutions of knowledge, memory and identity; and informationgathering, retrieval, and analysis. MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY FICTIONS This module focuses on the themes of reading and re-reading. An independent module, it is also designed to give you the opportunity for preparatory discussion of topics in optional modules. As a part of this, you will explore different critical approaches, such as feminism and deconstruction, as well as looking at key issues in literary studies such as the author and the reader. Associated careers The course is particularly relevant to those employed in a range of professions, including English teachers wishing to update their professional skills, and professional researchers. The part-time course would appeal to those interested in studying English literature for career development and general interest. Course-specific entry requirements You are required to have a good Honours degree (2:1 or above, or equivalent) in a relevant subject. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0 or equivalent. You will need to submit a 1,500 word critical essay on a literary text of your choice as part of your application. [-]

MA International Liaison and Communication

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  January 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This is a dynamic, pioneering interdisciplinary Masters course which meets the global demand for greater professionalism in interpersonal and inter-institutional bilingual communication. The course will focus on enhancing your personal skills as a communicator and facilitator of communication. This can be as an advocate, as a mediator, communication strategist, intermediary or communication facilitator. [+]

This is a dynamic, pioneering interdisciplinary Masters course which meets the global demand for greater professionalism in interpersonal and inter-institutional bilingual communication. The course will focus on enhancing your personal skills as a communicator and facilitator of communication. This can be as an advocate, as a mediator, communication strategist, intermediary or communication facilitator. Firmly grounded on the latest international communications theories and using real life simulations, you will learn to locate and analyse resources, pre-empt communications challenges and develop strategies to overcome obstacles to successful interaction. The course will enrich your knowledge and application of the key paradigms of international communication, information handling and presentation in a range of contexts from the field of public diplomacy to international media, intelligence, business and international NGOs. It also enhances your competencies in handling information across and between languages and cultures, in various professional settings. You will have the training and preparation to make significant contributions in your chosen profession. Course applicants typically come from fields such as language studies, translation and interpreting, social work, teaching, journalism and other areas of the media as well as from public office. However, the course will prove invaluable to anyone with high-level bilingual competence and experience in mediation between peoples from different cultural backgrounds. Course content By the end of the course you will be able to use the knowledge gained through a detailed study of diplomatic, intelligence and policy questions, and combine this with a high level of linguistic competence. This will enhance your ability as a presenter of information and as a mediator between communities. The course is designed to help you develop your professional specialism and enhance your skills within an appropriate conceptual framework. Core modules DISSERTATION This compulsory part of the course will help you to develop an understanding of the major components of research methodology: locating and using available research sources, (these will include, inter-alia, general and specialised libraries, reference works, indices and bibliographies, abstract services, and online databases; recording information and material collected; analysing data for reliability, comprehensiveness, bias and factuality; and finally assimilating material gathered into a dissertation. As a result, you will have established research skills such as locating and using available research sources and being able efficiently to analyse the material that you have collected. For your dissertation you will be required to synthesise the skills, factual knowledge, methods and perspectives that you have acquired. You will also need to provide evidence of independent enquiry and a creative approach. Thus the Dissertation should accurately reflect both your personal development and the educational effectiveness of the course. INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION The accelerating process of globalisation, and the growing international flow of information, goods and people, have changed the way individuals, institutions, businesses and governments operate in the international arena. They have also highlighted the demand for bilingual professionals who can meet the needs of an increasingly transnational work environment. This module examines the key theories of international communication, language and culture and provides an understanding of the political, economic, cultural and ideological dimensions of communication in a global context. It explores issues such as global media corporations, international flow of information, public diplomacy, and the role of NGOs. It focuses on developing language and communication skills applicable to a variety of bilingual professional settings. Particular attention is given to the impact of cultural differences on multicultural and transnational encounters. INTERNATIONAL LIAISON The need for effective communication in a global world is increasingly apparent. Effective communication is important not only for the individual but for those whose role is to facilitate interaction between representatives of professional and governmental and non- governmental organisations where people do not share the same language, culture or systems. This module considers current theories of information processing, communication and interpretation and places them in a professional environment. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the liaison official as advocate and facilitator, the link between cultures, the semiotic value of language, and its use as a tool of power. Various negotiation strategies are examined with reference to different cultures. Techniques for equal effective communication in two or more languages are examined and put into practice. Research Project – Bi-Lingual Presentation It is widely understood that a liaison professional needs to be able to handle information equally in two or more languages. For effective communication to exist, the liaison professional has to operate with the same degree of fluency, accuracy and sensitivity to linguistic register, regardless of language. The bilingual presentation provides training in presentation techniques and styles, considers culturally appropriate modes of discourse, and gives practice in the skill of parcelling information in the context of formal delivery. The content matter of the course is of topical, professional and personal interest and is provided in part from the varying backgrounds of the participants. Associated Careers Course graduates have gained success in communications-related positions in NGOs, diplomatic missions, international divisions of business and international organisations, as well as achieving a step-change in their original professions. Entry Requirements You are normally required to have a good first degree or equivalent in a relevant subject. Mature applicants with no formal qualifications but with appropriate work experience will also be considered. You need to be fluent to advanced level (C1 as defined by the CEFR) in at least two languages. Although not an absolute entry requirement, to succeed well on the course you need be up to date with world events and the different interpretations put on them by various stakeholders. [-]

MA International Relations

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  January 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course offers you an innovative, disciplined and intellectually challenging framework for studying issues and perspectives within international relations. You will consider various aspects of international order and politics, including the dynamics of international social and political power relationships and conflicts, and state building. [+]

This course offers you an innovative, disciplined and intellectually challenging framework for studying issues and perspectives within international relations. You will consider various aspects of international order and politics, including the dynamics of international social and political power relationships and conflicts, and state building. These topics are studied comparatively in relation to governmental, political and social processes, and in the contexts of various historical continuities, discontinuities and contrasts. Core modules Dissertation and Research Methods You will receive supervised guidance and research methods training (through a series of research method workshops, the dissertation induction and colloquium seminars, and individual dissertation supervision sessions) to prepare you for your Masters dissertation on an agreed research topic. You will begin identifying your dissertation interests at the start of your studies, when you will be able to discuss your ideas with different tutors who may direct you towards taking appropriate option modules that support your future research studies. This module must be taken either following the completion of all other modules, or concurrently with modules in your second semester. International Relations: Beyond International Relations? This module analyses the theory and the practice involved in giving international content to universal values and aspirations today. Part I analyses how two central tenets of realism have come under question: national interest and sovereignty. Part II considers the rights of the individual in the international sphere, focusing on humanitarian assistance and human rights. Part III traces the impact of new international practices to extend democracy, and Part IV analyses the recent developments in international justice and law. Part V considers whether a new global political actor is emerging – global civil society – which can overcome the international/domestic divide. International Relations: Theoretical Perspectives This module charts the development of International Relations (IR) as an academic discipline, locating the dominant theoretical perspectives within their historical and political contexts. The central theme is the analysis of how a broad range of theories reflect changes in the subject of IR theory – the sovereign state. It looks at the role of theory in IR, the historical development of the discipline, and focuses on competing theories. The course aims to familiarise you with the rich debate within the discipline and allow you to make up your own mind about your choice of theories. Course-specific entry requirements You should have a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours degree or equivalent in Social Sciences or Humanities; equivalent qualifications from overseas are welcome. Your application must be supported by a reference written on institutional notepaper by an academic familiar with your abilities. Applications from mature candidates are welcomed. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS overall score of 6.5 and 5.5 in Writing, Listening, Reading and Speaking or equivalent. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course. Associated careers This course will provide you with numerous key skills and knowledge that will prepare you for your future career in a variety of different fields. Our graduates hold posts within various international and national government departments and organisations. Many have also gone on to study for Doctorates within the Department and at other universities around the world. [-]

MA International Relations and Democratic Politics

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  January 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The Masters in International Relations and Democratic Politics provides an advanced critical and comprehensive understanding of the forces shaping state, inter-state relations and global politics. Drawing on key theoretical interpretations of democratic politics, the course probes into various tenets of democratic thinking (ranging from pluralism and civil society to egalitarianism and human rights)... [+]

The Masters in International Relations and Democratic Politics provides an advanced critical and comprehensive understanding of the forces shaping state, inter-state relations and global politics. Drawing on key theoretical interpretations of democratic politics, the course probes into various tenets of democratic thinking (ranging from pluralism and civil society to egalitarianism and human rights), and explores the interplay between theory and practice in old and new democracies and in processes of global governance. Is democracy a concept limited to a world of territorially-bounded national communities? Can democracy still limit power in a global world? How does democratic policy making operate in the face of complexity? By raising and examining such questions the course explores the changing and contested understandings of democracy in contemporary thought as well as its application to the international sphere in our increasingly complex world. Core modules DEMOCRATIC POLITICS: KEY DEBATES AND ISSUES The module examines key issues and debates in democratic politics. It focuses on 20th century democratic thought and discusses how key democratic ideas/ ideals have been interpreted and re-interpreted to address dominant trends and changes in democratic societies. The module identifies some of the challenges confronting democratic theory and practice, and it examines differences between old and new democracies. Throughout the module special emphasis is given to the dynamics of democratic institution and democratic renewal. DISSERTATION AND RESEARCH METHODS You will receive supervised guidance and research methods training (through a series of research method workshops, the dissertation induction and colloquium seminars, and individual dissertation supervision sessions) to prepare you for your Masters dissertation on an agreed research topic. You will begin identifying your dissertation interests at the start of your studies, when you will be able to discuss your ideas with different tutors who may direct you towards taking appropriate option modules that support your future research studies. This module must be taken either following the completion of all other modules, or concurrently with modules in your second semester. THE POLITICS OF GLOBAL COMPLEXITY: RETHINKING GOVERNANCE, POWER AND AGENCY This module introduces you to the theoretical frameworks and practices of the politics of global complexity, the debates that have been triggered, and the way that complexity understandings have developed, especially in the 1990s and 2000s. Emphasis is placed upon the conceptual frameworks deployed in understanding system effects on political, economic and social life and how these enable us to rethink democratic governance, power and agency. While focusing on conceptual frameworks, this module also engages with how complexity is reflected in new approaches to policy, and external stakeholders will provide input to the module (for example, the Social Market Foundation, Demos, the New Local Government Network and the Foreign Policy Centre). Course-specific entry requirements You should have a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours degree or equivalent in Social Sciences or Humanities; equivalent qualifications from overseas are welcome. Your application must be supported by a reference written on institutional notepaper by an academic familiar with your abilities. Applications from mature candidates are welcomed. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS overall score of 6.5 and 5.5 in Writing, Listening, Reading and Speaking or equivalent. The University offers presessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course. Associated careers This course will provide you with numerous key skills and knowledge that will prepare you for your future career in a variety of different fields. Our graduates hold posts within various international and national government departments and organisations. Many have also gone on to study for Doctorates within the Department and at other universities around the world. [-]

MA International Relations and Security

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  January 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course provides you with a detailed understanding of the nature of the contemporary security agenda, its origins, theoretical foundations and future trajectory. You will examine the theories of international security and those key security issues that have dominated security discourse in the post-Cold War era. [+]

The question of security now dominates contemporary international politics. Issues such as the 'War on Terror', pre-emptive self-defence and humanitarian intervention constitute seminal international concerns that have implications for all states and all peoples. This course provides you with a detailed understanding of the nature of the contemporary security agenda, its origins, theoretical foundations and future trajectory. You will examine the theories of international security and those key security issues that have dominated security discourse in the post-Cold War era. You will also develop your analytical skills in order to facilitate understanding of the seminal contemporary security issues in a broader theoretical and historical framework. Core modules Contemporary Controversies in International Security: Intervention Terrorism and Self-Defence The end of the Cold War fundamentally altered the nature of international security, heralding the emergence of new issues and threats. In the contemporary era the locus and nature of the paramount threats have altered, with intra-state conflicts and non-state actors characterising sources of insecurity. This module will provide you with a comprehensive overview of security discourse and practice since the end of the Cold War relating key issues such as humanitarian intervention, self-defence and terrorism to broader trends such as the evolving role of the UN, the challenges to international law and the new concern with intra-state crises. Dissertation and Research Methods You will receive supervised guidance and research methods training (through a series of research method workshops, the dissertation induction and colloquium seminars, and individual dissertation supervision sessions) to prepare you for your Masters dissertation on an agreed research topic. You will begin identifying your dissertation interests at the start of your studies, when you will be able to discuss your ideas with different tutors who may direct you towards taking appropriate option modules that support your future research studies. This module must be taken either following the completion of all other modules, or concurrently with modules in your second semester. Theories of International Security This module examines the contemporary discourse and debates surrounding the meaning of international security. The end of the Cold War fundamentally altered the structure of the international system and precipitated the emergence of a new security agenda. The new systemic dynamics and reconfigured security agenda led many to question the dominant theoretical frameworks previously applied to international security, and new security discourses – such as human security and critical security studies – have emerged to challenge established security theory. This module will examine the key tenets of the new theoretical frameworks and critically analyse their contribution to our understanding of 'security'. Course-specific entry requirements You should have a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours degree or equivalent; equivalent qualifications from overseas are welcome. Your application must be supported by a reference written on institutional notepaper by an academic familiar with your abilities. Applications from mature candidates are welcomed. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS overall score of 6.5 and 5.5 in Writing, Listening, Reading and Speaking or equivalent. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course. Associated careers This course will provide you with numerous key skills and knowledge that will prepare you for your future career in a variety of different fields. Our graduates hold posts within various international and national government departments and organisations. Many have also gone on to study for Doctorates within the Department and at other universities around the world. [-]

MA Museums, Galleries and Contemporary Culture

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  January 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course looks at the way that museums, galleries and other cultural institutions are changing to meet the needs of the 21st century. The MA has been designed for students who wish to work as curators, arts organisers, museum professional and other cultural managers and who want to know in particular how these institutions face contemporary issues. [+]

This course looks at the way that museums, galleries and other cultural institutions are changing to meet the needs of the 21st century. The MA has been designed for students who wish to work as curators, arts organisers, museum professional and other cultural managers and who want to know in particular how these institutions face contemporary issues. It looks at the changing role of cultural provision and how agencies, festivals and flexible organisations shape, house, fund, and disseminate culture today. The course also gives you the opportunity to immerse yourself in the contemporary debates about working practices in cultural institutions, and the changing context in which organisations operate. The course concentrates on professional practice and you will work closely with institutions such as Tate Britain and the Museum of London, and conduct case studies into creative projects run by organisations as diverse as the Victoria and Albert Museum, smaller independent galleries and London-based festivals and arts organisations. Classes are taught off-site at other institutions, and involve professionals from the sector as much as possible to give you an understanding of vocational issues and a close involvement in the workplace. Course content You will examine key issues and themes in the museums and gallery sector, and explore how these are dealt with not just in theory, but also on a day-to-day basis by leading institutions. You will learn about the challenges faced by museums and galleries, how they confront them and how they are developing innovative practices in relation to their collections, exhibitions and audiences. For example, sessions address how institutions use internet resources for learning and to promote their collections, new approaches to understanding arts audiences, and collaborations between creative arts organisations and museums. Gaining professional knowledge is an important part of the course and you will be encouraged to have a close involvement with institutions through internships, work placements and projects. The course is also designed to facilitate students who are currently in professional employment in cultural institutions. Professional work projects or internships can be used to replace modules on the course, as special study units, so that your work experience can contribute to the degree. The course is taught alongside the Visual Culture MA and shares modules with this and with other MAs taught in the Department, offering you a broad theoretic context that can cover wider aspects of the arts. The teaching team are curators, museum and gallery professionals, as well as scholars and fine artists. Teaching methods include seminars, tutorials, practical sessions and workshops, together with independent, student-directed study. The course has a strong emphasis on vocational learning, and you are encouraged to undertake professional placements and internships. Assessment methods include coursework (essays, oral presentations and professional project reports) as well as the final 10-12,000-word dissertation. There are no formal examinations. Core modules CURRENT ISSUES IN MUSEUM AND GALLERY STUDIES This module introduces students to the current issues being discussed by professionals and the pressing issues that are facing their institutions. They range from the changing role of organisations as public bodies and what their responsibilities are, to working in a post-recession economy where public funding is diminishing, to the ethics of sponsorship from the private sector. It will address topical issues such as the inclusivity and accessibility of organisations to audiences with disabilities and how museums deal with claims for the repatriation of artefacts to other countries. The module is structured around talks from museum and gallery professionals with additional reading groups where students will tackle the way issues are discussed in professional journals. This is a core module that all students will take as it covers essential knowledge for the MA. DISSERTATION This extended piece of research work is an opportunity for you to pursue a topic of individual interest, and is conducted through individual study and directed supervision. The module also includes preparation of a detailed research proposal. It consists of preliminary workshops focused on relevant research skills, followed by individual tutorials with your supervisor. Course-specific entry requirements You will normally be required to have a good first degree or equivalent. Applications from mature candidates with demonstrable relevant work experience and relevant professional qualifications are welcomed. In these cases, you may be required to undertake a written entrance test in the form of a short 1,500-word essay, and may also be required to assemble a work experience portfolio (consisting of testimonials, job descriptions etc). If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5, with at least 6.5 in each other element. Associated careers Graduates will have the skills to work in a variety of positions in the cultural sector, including in the post of curator, consultant, arts and media strategists and advisers, funding officers or education and interpretation officers. [-]

MA Specialised Translation

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The Specialised Translation MA is open to native and non-native speakers of English, who combine English with any of the following languages: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Polish or Spanish. If you are a native speaker of English, you can elect to study translation with one or two of the above source languages. [+]

The Specialised Translation MA is open to native and non-native speakers of English, who combine English with any of the following languages: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Polish or Spanish. If you are a native speaker of English, you can elect to study translation with one or two of the above source languages. If you are a non-native speaker of English, you will study translation both from English into your first language and from your first language into English. The Specialised Translation MA will prepare you for a career in the translation market. Building on your existing language skills, you will learn how to research specialised subjects to produce commercially usable translations of specialised technical and institutional texts, applying insights drawn from the study of linguistics and translation theory as well as from professional practice. You will complete a Translation Project or a Research Thesis. You will also be able to choose from a range of option modules that will, for example, give you an introduction to editing and revision, audiovisual translation, or computer-assisted translation, or enable you to acquire a working knowledge of another language for translation purposes. You will be able to benefit from our wide range of resources, including an extensive collection of volumes and electronic materials in our library, specialised software applications, and additional resources made available through the University's Virtual Learning Environment. Our teaching staff include full and part-time lecturers, all with professional expertise in translation and other specialist fields. You will be allocated a personal tutor and be given academic guidance by the course team. Course content The course emphasis is on practical training in translation, developing your skills to a high level and learning about the professional environment. If you are a native speaker of English, your core modules will involve translation from either one or two main source languages, chosen from Arabic, French, German, Italian, Polish and Spanish. If you are a native speaker of Arabic, French, German, Italian, Polish or Spanish, your core modules will cover translation from and into your native language (commonly referred to as your 'first' or 'main' language). All students will translate institutional texts (such as economic, political, legal and EU texts) and technical material, and learn new relevant skills through the option modules. You will also complete a research-based MA Thesis or an MA Translation Project (an extended translation with a preface and annotations).Your studies are further supported by blended learning provision on developing your professionalism, weekly lectures on the theoretical concepts and principles of translation, introductory workshops to a range of translation memory tools, and guest lectures and workshops delivered by external speakers from industry and international institutions. Core modules MAIN LANGUAGE INSTITUTIONAL TRANSLATION (INTO YOUR FIRST LANGUAGE)* You will be introduced to specialist texts of the kind you will be expected to handle in a professional context. These will cover international and government institutions, as well as the fields of economics, finance, business, politics and law. MAIN LANGUAGE TECHNICAL TRANSLATION (INTO YOUR FIRST LANGUAGE)* You will be introduced to a wide range of specialist texts relating to technology and science of the kind you will be expected to handle in a professional context. *Native speakers of English studying the course with two foreign languages will take the core Main Language Translation modules in both languages of study. Native speakers of English studying the course with one foreign language will take Editing: Principles and Practices and Computer-assisted Translation (see option modules below) as additional core modules and choose their option modules from the remaining range of options. SECOND LANGUAGE TECHNICAL TRANSLATION AND SECOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTIONAL TRANSLATION (NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ARABIC, FRENCH, GERMAN, ITALIAN, POLISH OR SPANISH ONLY) These modules differ from the Main Language modules only in that you will be translating into English as a second language for information purposes. MA TRANSLATION PROJECT OR MA THESIS The MA Translation Project is a 6,000-8,000-word extended translation into your native language on a subject of your choice, accompanied by a preface and a set of annotations on the translation challenges involved. Preparation for writing the preface and annotations will be provided by a series of lectures throughout the course. The MA Thesis is a piece of scholarly research, 12,000-15,000 words long, into a translation-related topic. You will attend regular research methodology and work-in-progress sessions. You will also receive individual supervision for the Translation Project or Thesis. Associated careers Graduates of the Specialised Translation MA have gone on to work as in-house translators within industry, commerce, international organisations and translation companies, as freelance translators, as translation project managers, or as editors, revisers, proofreaders, terminologists, or specialists in translation tools. Course-specific entry requirements You should have a good first degree in modern languages or another subject. Mature linguists without a degree, but with sufficient experience in a relevant area, are invited to apply. We will interview you in person or on the telephone and set you two translation tests to check your suitability for the course. The course is open to native speakers of Arabic, English, French, German, Italian, Polish, and Spanish. [-]

MA Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course provides you with a specialist combination of theoretical academic study and robust practical application and skills development in English language teaching. It provides advanced training for TESOL professionals, and examines the latest developments in TESOL methodology and related issues. [+]

This course provides you with a specialist combination of theoretical academic study and robust practical application and skills development in English language teaching. It provides advanced training for TESOL professionals, and examines the latest developments in TESOL methodology and related issues. You will develop the practical and professional skills involved in TESOL, along with the ability to analyse and apply theoretical perspectives to practical situations. The course enables you to develop your skills in argument, synthesis and critical expression of TESOL issues, and apply them in different teaching contexts. You will also enhance your advanced skills of research, presentation and analysis in TESOL contexts. Nurturing ongoing professional development and skills in pursuing further independent research is an important aspect of the course, enabling you to make a full contribution to professional development in your specialist area. Course content The course consists of three core modules and a range of option modules. The Language and Learning: Description and Analysis core module introduces in-depth exploration of the core concepts in the description and analysis of language and language learning, with specific reference to English language teaching and second language acquisition. The Current Developments in Language Teaching core module examines a wide range of current practice and developments, including communicative competence in language learning and teaching, language teaching methodology, and discrete and integrated skills. The Dissertation is the third core module. Core modules CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN LANGUAGE TEACHING You will examine current practice and developments in language teaching, including communicative competence in language learning. During this module you will cover a range of topical issues in language learning and teaching, including: content and language integrated learning; individual differences in language learning; language for specific purposes; learner autonomy and strategy training; methodology; neurolinguistic processing and multiple intelligences; skills lessons and real language; and teacher language and national curriculum. DISSERTATION This initial research-skills module will cover a range of topics, including: investigating and assessing the relevance of potential research sources; issues in research design, including identifying the field of study; planning, conducting and recording of research; the responsibility of the researcher and role of the supervisor; and writing up. The subsequent work you undertake will be conducted autonomously with supervisory support. LANGUAGE AND LEARNING: DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS This module introduces and encourages in-depth exploration of core concepts in the description and analysis of language, with specific reference to English language teaching. The module also introduces and encourages in-depth exploration of core concepts in language learning, with specific reference to second language acquisition and the implications of these concepts for the language teacher. The module is divided into two units, the first on language description and analysis, and the second on language learning. Course-specific entry requirements You are normally required to have a good first degree or equivalent. If you did not receive your first degree from a university in the UK, you will normally need to take an IELTS exam (or equivalent) and score 6.5 overall with at least 6 in each component. Associated careers The course enables you to make substantial progress as advanced English Language Teaching practitioners and managers in a variety of national, regional and cultural educational systems. You will have the training and preparation to make significant contributions as instructors, managers and researchers. [-]

MA TESOL & Creative Writing

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The course provides you with a unique combination of theoretical academic study, robust practical application, and skills development in English language teaching. There is a particular focus on using creative writing in the classroom as a significant part of your portfolio of skills as a teacher. [+]

The course provides you with a unique combination of theoretical academic study, robust practical application, and skills development in English language teaching. There is a particular focus on using creative writing in the classroom as a significant part of your portfolio of skills as a teacher. Course content The MA consists of five core modules (including the Dissertation) and one optional creative writing module, and is offered both full- and part-time. Full-time students study 180 credits in the academic year, while part-time students will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. Teaching methods include weekly two-hour lectures, tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops, together with independent, student-directed study. The Dissertation module consists of preliminary workshops focused on relevant research skills followed by individual tutorials with your supervisor. Assessment is through coursework in the form of essays, reports, oral presentations and creative writing portfolios, as well as the final 15,000-word dissertation. There are no formal examinations. Core modules CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN LANGUAGE TEACHING You will examine current practice and developments in language teaching, including communicative competence in language learning. During this module you will cover a range of topical issues in language learning and teaching, including: content and language integrated learning; individual differences in language learning; language for specific purposes; learner autonomy and strategy training; methodology; neurolinguistic processing and multiple intelligences; skills lessons and real language; and teacher language and national curriculum. DISSERTATION This initial research-skills module will cover a range of topics, including: investigating and assessing the relevance of potential research sources; issues in research design, including identifying the field of study; planning, conducting and recording of research; the responsibility of the researcher and role of the supervisor; and writing up. The subsequent work you undertake will be conducted autonomously with supervisory support. LANGUAGE AND LEARNING: DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS This module introduces and encourages in-depth exploration of core concepts in the description and analysis of language, with specific reference to English language teaching. The module also introduces and encourages in-depth exploration of core concepts in language learning, with specific reference to second language acquisition and the implications of these concepts for the language teacher. The module is divided into two units, the first on language description and analysis, and the second on language learning. USING LITERATURE IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING The module focuses on both the use of literary texts as a resource and the use of creative writing activities in the language learning classroom, by providing a working overview of useful, relevant aspects of linguistic and literary theory, and the practical demonstration of learner activities in producing and working with literary texts in the TESOL classroom. The module aims to develop your confidence and understanding of ways in which literary texts can be explored in the TESOL classroom, and the ways in which your own creative writing can be a resource for language teaching. Associated careers This course is intended to move you to a new level in your career as a teacher or writer by developing your skills as a sophisticated critical practitioner, and your knowledge base of pedagogy, the English language and its use in verbal art. You will receive the training and preparation to make significant professional contributions as an instructor, manager or researcher. Course-specific entry requirements You are normally required to have a good first degree or equivalent. Applications from mature candidates with demonstrable relevant experience and professional qualifications (eg CELTA, DELTA) are welcomed. Such applicants may be required to undertake a written entrance test in the form of a short 1,500-word essay and assemble a work-experience portfolio (testimonials, job descriptions, etc). You will also need to give two academic references and submit a portfolio of creative writing, which should not exclusively include poetry. Selected candidates will be invited for an interview. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 overall, with at least 6 in each element. [-]

MA Translation and Interpreting

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The Translation and Interpreting MA is open to native and non-native speakers of English, who combine English with any of the following languages: Chinese, French, Italian, Polish or Spanish. The course will provide you with professional training aimed at the translation and interpreting markets, building on your existing language skills to develop a career in those sectors. [+]

The Translation and Interpreting MA is open to native and non-native speakers of English, who combine English with any of the following languages: Chinese, French, Italian, Polish or Spanish. The course will provide you with professional training aimed at the translation and interpreting markets, building on your existing language skills to develop a career in those sectors. The course involves translation as well as conference and public service interpreting between one main language (Chinese, French, Italian, Polish or Spanish) and English,. You will learn how to research specialised subjects for professional translation and interpreting purposes and hone your translation and interpreting skills by extensive practice, applying insights drawn from the study of linguistics and translation and interpreting theory as well as from professional practice. You will complete a Translation or Interpreting Project or a Research Thesis. You will also be able to choose from a range of option modules that will, for example, give you an introduction to audiovisual translation, intercultural communication, or sociolinguistics, or enable you to acquire a working knowledge of another language for translation purposes. You will be able to benefit from our wide range of resources, including an extensive collection of volumes and electronic materials in our library, a state-of-the-art language lab and extensive interpreting facilities, and additional resources made available through the University's Virtual Learning Environment. Our teaching staff includes full and part-time lecturers, all with expertise in translation and interpreting and in other specialist fields. You will be allocated a personal tutor and be given academic guidance by the course team. Course content The course emphasis is on practical training in translation and interpreting, developing your skills to a high level and learning about the professional environments. If you are a native speaker of English, your translation modules will involve both institutional and technical translation from French, Italian, Polish or Spanish into English. If you are native speaker of Chinese, French, Italian, Polish or Spanish, your translation modules will cover institutional translation from and into your native language (commonly referred to as your 'first' or 'main' language). You will also study conference and public service interpreting, and learn new relevant skills through the option modules. You will also complete a research-based MA Thesis or an MA Translation or Interpreting Project. Your studies are further supported by regular student-led interpreting practice sessions and mock conferences, blended learning provision on developing your professionalism, weekly lectures on the theoretical concepts and principles of translation and interpreting, introductory workshops to a range of translation memory tools, and guest lectures and workshops delivered by external speakers from industry and international institutions. Core modules CONFERENCE INTERPRETING This module introduces you to interpreting in formal conference scenarios in consecutive and simultaneous mode. After an introduction to advanced skills in concentration, memory, message analysis and split attention, you will learn note-taking techniques in consecutive interpreting, and you will practise sight translation as well as simultaneous interpreting in the booth. PUBLIC SERVICE INTERPRETING This module introduces you to public service interpreting in the fields of health and law. Following targeted introductions to the subject areas and topics covered, you will practise public service interpreting in simulated situations. MAIN LANGUAGE INSTITUTIONAL TRANSLATION (INTO YOUR FIRST LANGUAGE) You will be introduced to specialist texts of the kind you will be expected to handle in a professional context. These will cover international and government institutions, as well as the fields of economics, finance, business, politics and law. MAIN LANGUAGE TECHNICAL TRANSLATION (NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH ONLY) You will be introduced to a wide range of specialist texts relating to technology and science of the kind you will be expected to handle in a professional context. SECOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTIONAL TRANSLATION (NATIVE SPEAKERS OF CHINESE, FRENCH, ITALIAN, POLISH OR SPANISH ONLY) This module differs from the main language module only in that you will be translating into English as a second language for information purposes. MA INTERPRETING PROJECT OR MA TRANSLATION PROJECT OR MA THESIS The MA Interpreting Project is an extended piece of work of 12,000 - 15,000 words, which aims to help you reflect on and apply theoretical models to your practice as a trainee interpreter. The project is divided into three parts: a reflective report logging your learning process during the MA, an error analysis of a portfolio of three speeches you have interpreted throughout the year, and a rhetorical analysis of one of these speeches. Preparation for the project will be provided in a series of workshops throughout the year. Alternatively, you can do an MA Translation Project, a 6,000 - 8,000-word extended translation on a subject of your choice, accompanied by a preface and a set of annotations on the translation challenges involved. Preparation for writing the preface and annotations will be provided by a series of lectures throughout the course. you can also choose to do an MA Thesis. This is a piece of scholarly research, 12,000 - 15,000 words long, on a translation- or interpreting-related topic. In preparation for writing your Thesis, you will attend regular research methodology and work-in-progress sessions. Regardless of your choice of Project or Thesis, you will also receive individual supervision. Associated careers Graduates of the course go on to develop careers as freelance and in-house translators in the corporate sector and in national and international organisations, or as freelance interpreters, editors and revisers, subtitlers, terminologists, translation project managers, and specialists in translation tools. Course-specific entry requirements You should have a first degree, although mature linguists without a degree but with sufficient experience in translation and/or interpreting are invited to apply. You will need fluent written and spoken English and, if English is not your first language, an IELTS score of 6.5 overall (with 7 in speaking) or equivalent. All applicants take an entry test consisting of written and oral components. Most successful applicants will have met the IELTS requirement when they submit their application as excellent English language skills are fundamentally important. It is vital that all applicants who do not have English as their first language provide clear details on their application form of the English language qualifications they have achieved and/or the date when they will be taking their IELTS test. [-]

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