SOAS University of London

Introduction

SOAS University of London

SOAS, University of London is the only Higher Education institution in Europe specialising in the study of Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East.

SOAS is a remarkable institution. Uniquely combining language scholarship, disciplinary expertise and regional focus, it has the largest concentration in Europe of academic staff concerned with Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

On the one hand, this means that SOAS scholars grapple with pressing issues - democracy, development, human rights, identity, legal systems, poverty, religion, social change - confronting two-thirds of humankind while at the same time remaining guardians of specialised knowledge in languages and periods and regions not available anywhere else in the UK.

This makes SOAS synonymous with intellectual enquiry and achievement. It is a global academic base and a crucial resource for London. We live in a world of shrinking borders and of economic and technological simultaneity. Yet it is also a world in which difference and regionalism present themselves acutely. It is a world that SOAS is distinctively positioned to analyse, understand and explain.

Our academic focus on the languages, cultures and societies of Africa, Asia and the Middle East makes us an indispensable interpreter in a complex world.

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Programmes

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Master

MMus Ethnomusicology

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme is tailored for musicians and musicologists, anthropologists, teachers and composers, as well as those dedicated to developing an in-depth knowledge of a specific music tradition. [+]

MMus Ethnomusicology Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent), usually in Music Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Theoretical and practical grounding in the discipline of ethnomusicology, as well as the opportunity to develop performance and ethnographic skills, regional expertise, and a deeper understanding of global music – just some of what you can expect to develop on the MMus Ethnomusicology. This programme is tailored for musicians and musicologists, anthropologists, teachers and composers, as well as those dedicated to developing an in-depth knowledge of a specific music tradition. You will study with the largest and most influential team of ethnomusicologists in the UK, who are experts in the musical traditions of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Central Asia and the Jewish world. You will be part of a thriving culture of performance, research and active engagement with music around the globe. The programme will suit those looking for a springboard into further research or employment in a range of music-related fields including journalism, industry, NGOs and education, and often serves as a conversion route for those trained predominantly in western music traditions. Structure The MMus programme involves taking three courses and writing a 11,000-word dissertation. In addition to these formal elements, students are expected to attend regular postgraduate and public seminars and may also participate in performance ensemble classes and other activities. Course Detail The four formal elements of the MMus Ethnomusicology programme are: The full unit core course Ethnomusicology in Practice. A broad introduction to the major themes of ethnomusicological study. Taught as a weekly two-hour lecture/seminar with additional tutorials. Part-time students must take this in their first year. The Dissertation in Music. A special study 11,000 words in length on a topic agreed with the candidate's supervisor. This will normally relate to the "major region" chosen below, but may instead deal with a theoretical or comparative topic. Part-time students normally take this in their final year. Select courses to the value of 90 credits from List A,B,C and/or D,including at least one course from list A. List A: Area Courses Atlantic Africa: (P)Layers of Mediation in African Popular Music (PG) - 15PMUC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Aspects of Music and Religion in South East Asia - 15PMUH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Central Asian Music - 15PMUH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Ethnicity, Religion and Gender in Middle Eastern Musical cultures - 15PMUH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian vocal music: Styles and histories - 15PMUH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Klezmer Music: Roots and Revival - 15PMUH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music in Selected Regions of Africa: Contexts and Structures - 15PMUC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Music, Place and Politics in Cuba - 15PMUH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Popular and Fusion Music in South East Asia (PG) - 15PMUH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Sacred Sound in South Asia - 15PMUH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 List B: Additional Music Courses African and Asian Cultures in Britain - 15PANH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Analysing World Music: Transcription & Analysis in Ethnomusicology - 15PMUH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Composition - 15PMUH013 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Digital traditional broadcasting communication - 15PMSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender and Music (MMus) - 15PMUH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music and Healing - 15PMUH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music in Development - 15PMUC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Performance - 15PMUC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Sound Recording and Production - 15PMSH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Music Business (Masters) - 15PMUH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 List C: Courses at King's College Students may also take up to a maximum of 45 credit units from King's College Department of Music (see this link for available options: https: //www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/music/study/handbook/programmes/pgt/mods15-16.aspx) . Special assessment rules apply for SOAS students taking King’s College courses to bring the credit rating of each course up to 45 credits. Please check with course tutors at King’s for specific requirements. Course choices will vary each year, at the time of completing this document, the following courses are available: Advanced Opera Study - (22.5 Unit) Advanced Studies in Musical Analysis & Criticism: Beethoven's Late Works - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Biography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Historiography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Performance, Gesture and Meaning - (22.5 Unit) Post-tonal Music and Composition Theory - (22.5 Unit) Theories of Modernism and the Avant-Garde - (22.5 Unit) 21st-Century Bach - (22.5 Unit) List D: Courses at SOAS from other departments in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities or MA Area Studies courses (including languages) in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. Course choices are subject to the agreement of both the course convenor and the MMus Ethnomusicology convenor. Courses will normally relate to the same geographical region chosen from List A course(s). Teaching & Learning The Department of Music has been highly rated for teaching and research in all recent assessment exercises, and is regularly ranked amongst the top Music departments in the UK in Good University Guides. Music students have access to the large Main Library of the School which holds numerous books, journals and recordings relevant to the study of ethnomusicology and world music, as well as the nearby British Library Sound Archive and other London libraries and museums. The SOAS Library holds copies of standard reference works on music, such as the current edition of the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. The Grove dictionary and the RILM database can also be accessed on line from computer terminals in the Library or elsewhere on the SOAS network. Listening facilities are provided in the Library, and most CDs are available on short loan. Among special items in the Department’s collections are: field recordings, films and slides a large working collection of musical instruments from Asia and Africa extensive staff collections relating to specific research interests Destinations A postgraduate degree in Ethnomusicology from SOAS gives students greater intercultural awareness, improved competency in performance and a better understanding of global music which will enable them to continue in the field of research or engage in related work. Equally, they develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and creative capacities including interpersonal skills, communication skills, focus, team work, passion and dedication. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Internet Advertising Board Marie Stopes International Association of Culture & World Music School of Traditional & Popular Music Vortex Jazz Club Sony/EMI S24 Film British Library Grant & Cutler British Library UK Government Warner Music Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Production Assistant Sound Archive assistant Bookseller Solicitor Finance Manager Manager of Musical Association Junior Research Executive Project support officer Policy adviser Playworker Library Assistant Local Councillor A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a great place to study Ethnomusicology. It has the flavour of the world spread through the music made by the students, lecturers and guests." Marina Di Giorgi [-]

MMus Performance

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme is designed for students who wish to specialise in performance while studying for an academic degree. Students have the unique opportunity to develop performance in specific Asian and African music traditions to professional standard. [+]

MMus Performance Duration: Full time: 1 calendar year. Part time: 2/3 calendar years. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent), usually in Music Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This programme is designed for students who wish to specialise in performance while studying for an academic degree. Students have the unique opportunity to develop performance in specific Asian and African music traditions to professional standard. They acquire expert knowledge about performance and the geographical or stylistic region of their performance specialism. The performance component of the programme, in which students choose an Asian or African performance tradition, includes practice-based research. Students study the music of a particular region alongside performance theory training. Through a range of optional courses they pursue additional interests as well. The programme is particularly suited to performing musicians who wish to deepen and broaden their theoretical perspectives and musical horizons. Many former students have found their performance careers enhanced, while others have gone on to engage with their performance from more critical, academic perspectives, including MPhil/PhD research. Structure Students are required to take 4 units (one unit courses being two-terms in duration, while half unit courses are taught in one term only). In addition to these formal elements, students may attend postgraduate and public seminars and may also participate in performance ensemble classes and other activities. Course Detail The formal elements of the MMus Performance programme are: Performance Theory (half unit) The compulsory core course; part-time students must normally take this in year 1. Performance (full unit) Performance lessons in a vocal or instrumental tradition from their selected region. Examined by a public recital in May-June (for part-time students: in May-June of year 1) and by coursework. Performance as Research (full unit) Further study of the same tradition as under 3 above, but with a more specific research focus. Examined by a public recital in September (for part-time students: in September of the final year) and by coursework. Select courses to the value of 67.5 credits from List A,B and/or C, including at least one course from List A. List A: Area Courses Aspects of Music and Religion in South East Asia - 15PMUH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Atlantic Africa: (P)Layers of Mediation in African Popular Music (PG) - 15PMUC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Central Asian Music - 15PMUH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Ethnicity, Religion and Gender in Middle Eastern Musical cultures - 15PMUH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian vocal music: Styles and histories - 15PMUH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Klezmer Music: Roots and Revival - 15PMUH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music in Selected Regions of Africa: Contexts and Structures - 15PMUC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Music, Place and Politics in Cuba - 15PMUH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Popular and Fusion Music in South East Asia (PG) - 15PMUH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Sacred Sound in South Asia - 15PMUH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 List B: Additional Courses Analysing World Music: Transcription & Analysis in Ethnomusicology - 15PMUH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Composition - 15PMUH013 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Gender and Music (MMus) - 15PMUH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 The Music Business (Masters) - 15PMUH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 List C: Courses Taught at King's College Students may also take approved courses from Kings College Department of Music (see this link for available options: //www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/music/study/handbook/programmes/pgt/mods15-16.aspx) Special assessment rules apply for SOAS students to bring the credit rating up to 22.5 – please check with course tutors at King’s for requirements. Advanced Opera Study - (22.5 Unit) Advanced Studies in Musical Analysis & Criticism: Beethoven's Late Works - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Biography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Historiography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Performance, Gesture and Meaning - (22.5 Unit) Post-tonal Music and Composition Theory - (22.5 Unit) Theories of Modernism and the Avant-Garde - (22.5 Unit) 21st-Century Bach - (22.5 Unit) Teaching & Learning The Department of Music has been highly rated for teaching and research in all recent assessment exercises, and is regularly ranked amongst the top Music departments in the UK in Good University Guides. Music students have access to the large Main Library of the School which holds numerous books, journals and recordings relevant to the study of ethnomusicology and world music, as well as the nearby British Library Sound Archive and other London libraries and museums. The SOAS Library holds copies of standard reference works on music, such as the current edition of the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. The Grove dictionary and the RILM database can also be accessed on line from computer terminals in the Library or elsewhere on the SOAS network. Listening facilities are provided in the Library, and most CDs are available on short loan. Among special items in the Department’s collections are: field recordings, films and slides a large working collection of musical instruments from Asia and Africa extensive staff collections relating to specific research interests Performance The Convenor will communicate by email and through meetings with all students taking Performance or Performance as Research, and must be approached for official approval of your choice of performance tradition and teacher. Such approval is signalled by the Convenor’s signature on the Department’s standard “Performance study application form”, available from the Faculty office and online. No lessons should be taken until this form has been signed. The staff member most closely related to your chosen tradition acts as a Sub-convenor and should be your first point of contact for any matters pertaining to the specific tradition you are studying. Convenor and Sub-convenor will liaise as necessary. The Department will not support training in “Western” vocal or instrumental traditions. Subsidy towards the cost of lessons: The Department will pay for approved external tuition, up to a maximum amount agreed at the start of the session (currently £500 for Performance and £300 for Performance as Research). Please be aware that the cost of regular performance lessons might exceed these amounts; any excess must be paid by the student. Claims for reimbursement must be submitted using the standard Music Performance Lesson Reimbursement Form available from the convenor, accompanied by a signed receipt or invoice from the teacher. Claims cannot be accepted after the examination. The student is also responsible for arranging regular lesson times, negotiating lesson fees, and obtaining access to any necessary instrument. You will receive an Information Sheet for External Teachers, describing payment procedures, the teacher’s obligations, and so forth; you should read through this together with your teacher at the earliest opportunity. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Music Performance from SOAS gives students improved competency in performance and a better understanding of global music which will enable them to continue in the field of research or engage in related work. Equally, they develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and creative capacities including interpersonal skills, communication skills, focus, team work, passion and dedication. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Specific Graduate Destinations Helen Evans is an Education Officer for the Asian Music Circuit. Jo Shaw (née Hoskin) was gamelan co-ordinator for the London Symphony Orchestra’s educational Discovery programme, but is moving on to set up her own Indonesian music and dance programme in southwest England. Sarah Hall has worked as India regional director for two different charities. Jon Kertzer directed the Smithsonian Global Sound Network and is now working on the business development of the Microsoft MSN Music Service. Hélène Rammant is a Producer for BBC Radio 3, specialising in World Music. Megan Jones is a Producer in the Music Department of BBC Cymru Wales. Katie Vickers (née Hall) is a music Marketing Officer for the South Bank Centre, London. Sally Pomme Clayton is a storyteller and lecturer on world oral traditions at Middlesex University. Rachel Ireland first served as executive assistant at the Great Britain-Sasakawa Foundation and is now Executive Officer, Operations for the London-based charity Youth Music. Chua Siew Ling is a music officer in the Ministry of Education in Singapore. Louise Taylor was an administrator for Folkworks at the Sage Gateshead music centre, and has now moved on to a related community post in Newcastle. Elie Gussman is an Education Officer for the Asian Music Circuit. London. Nobuko Miyazaki is an Education Officer for the Asian Music Circuit, London. Many other MMus graduates continue on to do MPhil/PhD research. Others return, enhanced, to their previous careers. For example, Belinda Sykes is Professor of Medieval Song at Trinity College of Music and singer and director of the Arabic and European medieval song ensemble Joglaresa. A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a great place to study Ethnomusicology. It has the flavour of the world spread through the music made by the students, lecturers and guests." Marina Di Giorgi [-]

MRes in Finance and Management

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MRes in Finance and Management degree at SOAS is unique in two respects. First, it combines a broad based training in quantitative and qualitative research methods used in financial and management studies. Secondly, due to the research background of academics at SOAS and their regional expertise, the qualitative and quantitative research methods introduced can be applied in the context of developing and emerging economies. [+]

MRes in Finance and Management Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two calendar years (part-time) Subjects Preferred: Minimum first degree with good grades in any subject equivalent to a UK upper second class honours Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time The MRes in Finance and Management degree at SOAS is unique in two respects. First, it combines a broad based training in quantitative and qualitative research methods used in financial and management studies. Secondly, due to the research background of academics at SOAS and their regional expertise, the qualitative and quantitative research methods introduced can be applied in the context of developing and emerging economies. The programme is suitable for students with a background of BA or BSc level who wish to progress to undertake a PhD, but who do not already hold a Masters level qualification. It is also suitable for students who want to improve their qualitative and quantitative research methods skills, and for those whose Masters level degree did not contain significant research methods components. In many cases, students will wish to join a PhD programme after successfully completing the MRes in Finance and Management. Structure The MRes in Finance and Management has two components: Four core modules (2 units) Dissertation of 20,000 words on an approved topic (2 units) The 20,000-word dissertation is worth 50% of your final mark. During term 2 you will submit your dissertation proposal and select an academic supervisor. Over the ensuing months you should meet with your supervisor at least three times before the end of term 3 for guidance. The bulk of your dissertation will be written over the summer to meet the mid-September deadline. Part-time Study Part-time students are required to complete two of the core courses during their first year, then two core courses and the dissertation during their second year. Please see the programme specification below for further information. Core Modules Analysing Qualitative and Quantitative Data - 15PFMC084 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Theories in Management and Finance - 15PFMC086 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Research Design and Epistemology - 15PFMC085 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Advanced Quantitative Research Methods - 15PFMC083 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Destinations The Department of Financial and Management Studies (DeFiMS) maintains close links with employers in the United Kingdom, and its focus regions. We expect that many of our graduates will move into higher education, research and development, manufacturing, banking, consulting, media, and other industries. A Student's Perspective "SOAS is the best place to study the rising economy of China. The Library has an extensive range of books and journals to keep you informed about China’s past, present and future business environment." Bauhinia Chi Har Lam [-]

MSc

MSc African Politics

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The Department of Politics and International Studies offers seven linked masters programmes in politics and the international politics of Asia and Africa. The MSc African Politics is a regional specialist MSc, aiming to provide students with a detailed specialist understanding of both domestic and international politics (and of the implications of one for the other) in Africa. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write substantial papers that often require significant independent work. [+]

MSc African Politics Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: The qualification for entry is normally a first or upper-second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Politics or International Relations, or a related social science discipline. Applicants without such a background may be considered for admission depending on their academic training and undergraduate performance. Start of programme: September intake only The Department of Politics and International Studies offers seven linked masters programmes in politics and the international politics of Asia and Africa. The MSc African Politics is a regional specialist MSc, aiming to provide students with a detailed specialist understanding of both domestic and international politics (and of the implications of one for the other) in Africa. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write substantial papers that often require significant independent work. Structure Students take taught courses to the value of 3 full units + dissertation: 1. ONE unit from A (compulsory) 2-3. TWO units from B, C or D. 4. Dissertation on some aspect of African Politics (compulsory). A. Compulsory Course: Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year B. Full-Unit Politics Courses: Politics of Globalisation and Development in Asia and Africa - 15PPOC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year State & society in Asia & Africa - 15PPOC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year International politics of Africa - 15PPOC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic/Democratic Political Thought - 15PPOC255 (1 Unit) - Full Year C. Half-Unit Politics courses (maximum 1.0 unit total from this list): Violence, justice and the politics of memory - 15PPOH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Conflict, rights and justice - 15PPOH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International migration and diaspora politics - 15PPOH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Security governance - 15PPOH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Comparative International Political Thought - 15PPOH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Queer Politics in Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PGNH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Political Thought on the Just Rebellion - 15PPOH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Approaches to Comparative Political Thought - 15PPOH028 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Indian Ocean in World Politics - 15PPOH032 (0.5 - Term 2 Unit) Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research - 15PPOH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Foreign Policy Analysis - 15PPOH013 (0.5 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 D: Courses focused on Africa in a cognate discipline (maximum 1.0 unit total from this list): Courses from this section may only be taken with permission of the programme convenor and relevant course convenor. Economic development in Africa - 15PECC203 (1 Unit) - Full Year Language courses: students should chose the language they wish to take from the list below. They should then make contact with the relevant Course Convenor during welcome week who will assess which level of course would be appropriate, and will advise re. changing course enrolments if necessary. Amharic 1 (PG) - 15PAFC130 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hausa 1 (PG) - 15PAFC136 (1 Unit) - Full Year Somali 1 (PG) - 15PAFC132 (1 Unit) - Full Year Swahili 1 (PG) - 15PAFC140 (1 Unit) - Full Year Yoruba 1 (PG) - 15PAFC134 (1 Unit) - Full Year Zulu 1 (PG) - 15PAFC128 (1 Unit) - Full Year E. Dissertation: This would focus on some aspect of African Politics raised by the compulsory course 15PPOC205 Dissertation in Political Studies - 15PPOC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Learning Resources SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. A Student's Perspective "Before I came to SOAS, I knew that my grade would depend on either one or two large assignments and I was apprehensive about that—almost scared, however I am glad as I got to learn a lot about myself as a student. I became more independent academically and got to see what I can really accomplished without teachers “coddling” me along the way. Extremely refreshing!" Tamara Bah, American University, Washington [-]

MSc Asian Politics

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The expertise available in the Department enables students to concentrate on one of the sub-regions of Asia, (East Asia. South Asia, Southeast Asia and Central Asia) should they choose to do so. Alternatively, they may follow a more comparative approach by selecting a mixture of units covering different sub-regions. [+]

MSc Asian Politics Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: The qualification for entry is normally a first or upper-second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Politics or International Relations, or a related social science discipline. Applicants without such a background may be considered for admission depending on their academic training and undergraduate performance. Start of programme: September intake only Containing 60 percent of the world’s population, Asia is the setting for many of the most important political issues in the world today. These issues include the rise of China and India, economic dynamism of the Asian-Pacific area, regional integration (ASEAN, SAARC, Shanghai Cooperation Organization), security hotspots (Korean Peninsula, Taiwan Straits, India-Pakistan, the ‘global war on terror’), democratic transition and consolidation, the survival of non-democratic regimes, and identity conflicts of ethnicity, religion and language. To understand these and other political processes, this MSc programme draws upon the concepts and methods of the sub-disciplines of comparative politics (political sociology and political economy) and international relations. The evidence from Asia will also reveal the relevance and limitations of the concepts and methods derived from North American/European settings and suggest ways in which they may be modified. The expertise available in the Department enables students to concentrate on one of the sub-regions of Asia, (East Asia. South Asia, Southeast Asia and Central Asia) should they choose to do so. Alternatively, they may follow a more comparative approach by selecting a mixture of units covering different sub-regions. Structure Students take taught courses to the value of 3 full units + dissertation: 1. ONE unit from A (compulsory); 2-3. TWO units from B, C or D; 4. Dissertation on some aspect of Asian Politics (compulsory). Nb. Students on this programme may only take ONE China-focused unit: 15PPOC012, 15PPOC018 OR 15PPOC252 A. ONE of the following Regional Politics Courses: Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Government and politics of modern South East Asia - 15PPOC247 (1 Unit) - Full Year State and Society in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Geopolitics and Security in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Northeast Asian politics: Japan, Korea and Taiwan - 15PPOC253 (1 Unit) - Full Year State and society in the Chinese political process - 15PPOC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year B. ONE or TWO of the following Regional Politics Courses: China and international politics - 15PPOC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year International politics of East Asia - 15PPOC251 (1 Unit) - Full Year Japan Unravelled - 15PPOH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The Indian Ocean in World Politics - 15PPOH032 (0.5 - Term 2 Unit) C. ONE of the following Disciplinary Politics Courses: Politics of Globalisation and Development in Asia and Africa - 15PPOC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year State & society in Asia & Africa - 15PPOC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Queer Politics in Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PGNH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Comparative International Political Thought - 15PPOH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Political Thought on the Just Rebellion - 15PPOH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic/Democratic Political Thought - 15PPOC255 (1 Unit) - Full Year Approaches to Comparative Political Thought - 15PPOH028 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research - 15PPOH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 D. ONE of the following Courses focussed on Asia in a Cognate Discipline: Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya - 15PSAC291 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic problems and policies in modern China - 15PECC035 (1 Unit) - Full Year Japanese Modernity I - 15PHIH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Modernity II - 15PHIH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 (Students wishing to take 15PHIH013 must also take 15PHIH014) Language courses: students should chose the language they wish to take from the list below. They should then make contact with the relevant Course Convenor during welcome week who will assess which level of course would be appropriate, and will advise re. changing course enrolments if necessary. Elementary Spoken Cantonese (PG) - 15PCHC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year Elementary spoken Hokkien (Minnanyu, Taiwanese) (PG) - 15PCHC007 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 1 (PG) - 15PCHC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intensive Elementary Tibetan (PG) - 15PCHC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Basic Japanese 1 (PG) - 15PJKC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Elementary Korean (PG) - 15PJKC015 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Bengali Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC303 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hindi Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC295 (1 Unit) - Full Year Nepali Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC298 (1 Unit) - Full Year Urdu Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC300 (1 Unit) - Full Year Burmese Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC039 (1 Unit) - Full Year Indonesian Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Khmer (Cambodian) Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC043 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Thai Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC040 (1 Unit) - Full Year Vietnamese Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC036 (1 Unit) - Full Year E. Dissertation: This would focus on some aspect of Asian Politics. Dissertation in Political Studies - 15PPOC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Learning Resources SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. A Student's Perspective "The MSc in Middle East Politics allowed me to take both Politics courses and a language option, all of which I enjoyed. The lecturers were fantastic! My favourite class was Politics of Resistance in the Middle East which was clearly helpful for understanding contemporary politics of the region." Judith Nubold [-]

MSc Comparative Political Thought

Campus Full time September 2017 United Kingdom London

The programme is designed for graduate students who wish to learn about the diverse strands of political thinking in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and the different approaches to comparison in political thought. It is highly relevant to students who wish to embark on doctoral studies in the area of non-Western political thought. It is also relevant for practitioners working in or intending to work in governments, international organizations, think tanks and advocacy groups who wish to acquire deeper knowledge of ideas and values that inform political practices in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. [+]

The programme is designed for graduate students who wish to learn about the diverse strands of political thinking in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and the different approaches to comparison in political thought. It is highly relevant to students who wish to embark on doctoral studies in the area of non-Western political thought. It is also relevant for practitioners working in or intending to work in governments, international organizations, think tanks and advocacy groups who wish to acquire deeper knowledge of ideas and values that inform political practices in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. The MSc in Comparative Political Thought builds on SOAS’s wealth of regional expertise to offer a new approach to cross-regional comparison of political thinking. It reframes the study of political thought in Africa, Asia and the Middle East as a study of political ideas and political practices. The programme introduces students to the key approaches, debates, and questions in the emerging sub-discipline of comparative political thought. Covering a range of thinkers, traditions and texts, in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, it provides learning opportunities for students to compare ideas and values across regions and historical periods. The MSc in Comparative Political Thought will enable graduate students to undertake further advanced study and research in political thought, as well as enhance skills suitable for employment in multicultural and international professional contexts. For further details about course structure, duration, fees etc, please visit SOAS website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/msc-comparative-political-thought/ [-]

MSc Contemporary China Studies

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MSc in Contemporary China Studies attracts students with diverse backgrounds and study/work experiences. Students may come from undergraduate degrees in various social science subjects such as Economics, Sociology, Social Policy, Geography, Politics, International Relations, Management and Anthropology. Previous undergraduate coursework on China is not a compulsory requirement for admission. Applications will be considered from those who have worked in NGOs, civil service, or similar fields. As research methodology training is a compulsory part of the core course, the programme may also serve well as a channel to a research degree on China (MPhil or PhD). [+]

MSc Contemporary China Studies Duration: One year Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This 12-month programme combines high quality postgraduate social science research training with a comprehensive study of contemporary China. The key features of this programme are: interdisciplinary teaching; social scientific study of China; contemporary Chinese society, defined broadly as post-1949; research methodology training that is relevant to the study of China (part of the core course); a language option which provides maximum flexibility to students who would like to improve Chinese language skills; an internship option which provides students with an opportunity to gain insights into China’s cultural and/or business environment. The MSc in Contemporary China Studies attracts students with diverse backgrounds and study/work experiences. Students may come from undergraduate degrees in various social science subjects such as Economics, Sociology, Social Policy, Geography, Politics, International Relations, Management and Anthropology. Previous undergraduate coursework on China is not a compulsory requirement for admission. Applications will be considered from those who have worked in NGOs, civil service, or similar fields. As research methodology training is a compulsory part of the core course, the programme may also serve well as a channel to a research degree on China (MPhil or PhD). Entry Requirements SOAS has general minimum entrance requirements for registration for a postgraduate taught degree. No additional requirements specific to the MSc Contemporary China Studies programme which can be taken with or without knowledge of a Chinese language. Structure Students on the programme take the core course Understanding Contemporary China - 15PCIC002 and two taught option courses (2 Units) from the list given below. Those who wish to improve their Chinese language skills may take language courses (1 Unit maximum) from the Faculty of Cultures and Languages and one other option course (1 Unit). In addition, students write a 10,000 word dissertation. This course includes the option of undertaking a 4-week internship sometime during June/July. Core Module Understanding Contemporary China - 15PCIC002 (1 Unit) Optional Modules China and international politics - 15PPOC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 ( Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Culture and Society of Taiwan - 15PCHH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Economic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region - 15PECC334 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic problems and policies in modern China - 15PECC035 (1 Unit) - Full Year International politics of East Asia - 15PPOC251 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Media Spectacle and Urban Space in East Asia - 15PMSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year Nationhood and Competing Identities in Modern China - 15PHIH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Northeast Asian politics: Japan, Korea and Taiwan - 15PPOC253 (1 Unit) - Full Year Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 State and society in the Chinese political process - 15PPOC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Language (optional) Elementary spoken Hokkien (Minnanyu, Taiwanese) (PG) - 15PCHC007 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intensive Elementary Tibetan (PG) - 15PCHC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Practical Translation: Chinese to English - 15PCHH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Practical Translation: English to Chinese - 15PCHH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Special Course in Chinese 1 (PG) - 15PCHC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 2 (PG) - 15PCHC011 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 3 (PG) - 15PCHC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 4 (PG) - 15PCHC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese: Reading Classical and Literary Chinese (PG) - 15PCHC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year Styles of Modern Chinese Literary Language - 15PCHC016 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning Lectures and Seminars Most courses require students to attend two or three hours of classes each week. This time will be spent in lectures, seminars, tutorial discussions and student presentations: the exact mixture of activities varies somewhat from course to course. At Masters level there is a particular emphasis on students’ contributions and presentations, and students are also expected to read extensively and prepare for each class in advance. Language courses typically involve more hours of contact time, especially at elementary level, and regular homework. The assessment on most courses consists of two or three coursework essay assignments and an unseen written examination, sat in April or May. However, some courses are assessed purely on the basis of coursework, including essays and reaction papers. Dissertation A 10,000-word dissertation will be written on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MSc Contemporary China Studies and the candidate's supervisor. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. The China and Inner Asia collection consists of approximately 200,000 volumes and 5,000 periodicals. A Student's Perspective "One of the most memorable things I did outside of SOAS was to sign up for a homestay – it’s free through SOAS, it’s just for the weekend, and it gives you a taste of English life outside of London. " Nancy Wang, Williams College [-]

MSc Contemporary India Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MSc Contemporary India Studies degree offers a critical, cutting edge study of present day India. The programme takes an interdisciplinary approach and provides analytical training. [+]

MSc Contemporary India Studies Duration: 12 months (full-time); Two or three years (part-time) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time The MSc Contemporary India Studies degree offers a critical, cutting edge study of present day India. The programme takes an interdisciplinary approach and provides analytical training. Students have the opportunity to choose to study contemporary India topics, issues and challenges in the following subjects: anthropology, cinema, culture, development studies, history, law, literature, politics, study of religions and languages. The MSc Contemporary India Studies programme: introduces students to recent topics, methods and debates in the study of India prepares students at an advanced level to pursue research interests allows students to opt in for language training in Bengali, Hindi, Nepali, Panjabi and Urdu The MSc Contemporary India Studies is based in the South Asia Institute which has an active schedule of events and seminars throughout the year and attracts renowned speakers and scholars not only from India but also internationally. Internship opportunity The MSc Contemporary India Studies degree offers students the opportunity to go on a 2-4 week work placement to India during the course of their studies, with placements provided through SOAS’ vibrant alumni network and the Careers Office. Opportunities for placements fall within three broad areas: NGOs and development; business and economics; and media and journalism. They are arranged through the Careers Office and administered by the South Asia Institute. The MSc Contemporary India Studies is designed to appeal to those interested in understanding current events and developments in India and who want to gain a deeper understanding for academic or commercial purposes such as business, industry, government departments or NGOs. Structure Students take the core module Contemporary India: Issues, Methods and Approaches plus two taught option modules (2 units) from the list below (a maximum of 1.0 unit may be a language course). In addition, students write a 10,000-word dissertation on Contemporary India. The dissertation will include the option of undertaking a 2-4 week internship during the summer months either arranged by students to be approved by the course director or through the Careers Office who have a database of organisations offering internship positions in India as well as the UK in terms of diaspora activities. Core Module Contemporary India: Issues, Methods and Approaches - 15PAIC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year Optional Modules Anthropology and Sociology Department Religions on the move: New Currents and Emerging Trends in Global Religion - 15PANH055 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian Cinema: Its History and Social Context - 15PSAH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Cinema Indian Cinema: Key Issues - 15PSAH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Culture Contemporary Punjab: Society and Culture across Borders - 15PAIC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Modern Bengal: the Evolution of Bengali Culture and Society from 1690 to the Present Day (MA) - 15PSAC289 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Development Studies Agrarian Development, Food Policy and Rural Poverty - 15PDSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Aid and development - 15PDSH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Borders and Development - 15PDSH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Civil society, social movements and the development process - 15PDSH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Development practice - 15PDSH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Environment, Governance and Development - 15PDSH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global commodity chains, production networks and informal work - 15PDSH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global Health and Development - 15PDSH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Issues in forced migration - 15PDSH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Migration and Policy - 15PDSH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Natural resources, development and change: putting critical analysis into practice - 15PDSH031 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Neoliberalism, Democracy and Global Development - 15PDSH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The working poor and development - 15PDSH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Understanding economic migration: Theories, Patterns and Policies - 15PDSH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Water and development:conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 History Gender, law and the family in the history of modern South Asia - 15PHIH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Law Human Rights in The Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit) - Full Year Literature Literature & Colonialism in North India (Masters) - 15PSAH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Narratives of Mobility in Contemporary Hindi Literature (Masters) - 15PSAH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Media Transnational Communities and Diasporic Media:Networking, Connectivity, Identity - 15PMSH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Politics Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 The Indian Ocean in World Politics - 15PPOH032 (0.5 - Term 2 Unit) Study of Religions Religions and Development - 15PSRH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Language Options Bengali Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC303 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hindi Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC295 (1 Unit) - Full Year Nepali Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC298 (1 Unit) - Full Year Punjabi Language 1 - 15PSAC320 (1 Unit) - Full Year Urdu Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC300 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning Lectures and Seminars Most courses require students to attend two or three hours of classes each week. This time will be spent in lectures, seminars, tutorial discussions and student presentations: the exact mixture of activities varies somewhat from course to course. At Masters level there is a particular emphasis on students’ contributions and presentations, and students are also expected to read extensively and prepare for each class in advance. Language courses typically involve more hours of contact time, especially at elementary level, and regular homework. The assessment on most courses consists of two or three coursework essay assignments and an unseen written examination, sat in April or May. However, some courses are assessed purely on the basis of coursework, including essays and reaction papers. Dissertation A 10,000-word dissertation will be written on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MSc Contemporary India Studies and the candidate's supervisor. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. The China and Inner Asia collection consists of approximately 200,000 volumes and 5,000 periodicals. A Student's Perspective "The most lucrative resource has been the SOAS library which has an excellent South Asia collection. Also, the central London location of SOAS means I never really go far for anything!" Akhil Katyal [-]

MSc Development Economics

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 United Kingdom London

All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Development Economics will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must take three optional courses and complete a dissertation in an area of applied economics. [+]

Start of programme: September intake only All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Development Economics will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must take three optional courses and complete a dissertation in an area of applied economics. The objectives of the programme are: To enable students to apply the principles of economic analysis to the design of economic policy To teach postgraduates the technical and analytical skills to qualify them to practice as professional economists To enable practicing professional economists to improve and update their skills and knowledge To impart the skills and knowledge that enable students to progress towards PhD research Students will benefit from studying with experts in development economics within the Department. More broadly, students will benefit from the Department's Political Economy of Development seminar series and other open lectures offered in the School. All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. For further information about this course including a timetable please see here: Preliminary maths and Statistics Course. For further details about duration, fees, and course structure, please visit SOAS website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/mscdevecon/ [-]

MSc Development Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The programme attracts applications from students with a variety of academic and experiential backgrounds. We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, development issues. A good first degree in a social science is preferred. [+]

MSc Development Studies Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Relevant work experience may also be considered. Subjects Preferred: Social Science Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? The programme attracts applications from students with a variety of academic and experiential backgrounds. We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, development issues. A good first degree in a social science is preferred. Development Studies is a dynamic field concerned with processes of change in the South - social and economic, political and cultural - and the major policy challenges they present to efforts to overcome poverty and insecurity. This programme provides a solid interdisciplinary social science formation in development theory and practice and develops students’ capacities for independent and critical analysis. Highlights include: the meanings of development and the challenges it faces neoliberalism and its critiques industrialisation, labour and capital state failure, poverty and insecurity gender and class analysis NGOs, civil society and social movements globalisation, commodity chains and trade the agrarian question, peasantry and land The MSc programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills has been of great benefit to the many graduates who have returned to, or taken up, professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the Department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes. The MSc Development Studies has four components: two compulsory modules; one full-module option or two half-module options; and a dissertation of 10,000 words. Please see Postgraduate Modules for details on core and optional modules taught within the Department. Structure Overview There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a dissertation. All students take two core modules, Political Economy of Development and Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. Specialisation Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals. Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure. Core Courses All students take both Political Economy of Development and Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. The dissertation is compulsory. All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics. Political economy of development - 15PDSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory, policy and practice of development - 15PDSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Development Studies - 15PDSC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Non-Assessed Courses All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics. Optional Modules - Development Studies Students may choose optional modules (one full module or two half modules) from the list below. Please check to ensure that any module in which you have a special interest is running in the year that you wish to study. In addition, access to relevant modules in other departments may be negotiated subject to the agreement of both Convenors. Agrarian Development, Food Policy and Rural Poverty - 15PDSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Aid and development - 15PDSH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Borders and Development - 15PDSH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Civil society, social movements and the development process - 15PDSH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Natural resources, development and change: putting critical analysis into practice - 15PDSH031 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Development practice - 15PDSH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Environment, Governance and Development - 15PDSH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Extractive Industries, Energy, Biofuels and Development in a Time of Climate Change - 15PDSH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Famine and food security - 15PDSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Fundamentals of research methods for Development Studies - 15PDSH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global commodity chains, production networks and informal work - 15PDSH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global Health and Development - 15PDSH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Issues in forced migration - 15PDSH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Marxist Political Economy and Global Development - 15PDSH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Migration and Policy - 15PDSH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Neoliberalism, Democracy and Global Development - 15PDSH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Problems of development in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PDSH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Security - 15PDSH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The working poor and development - 15PDSH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Understanding economic migration: Theories, Patterns and Policies - 15PDSH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Water and development:conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Open Options in Other Departments Economics Department Economic development in Africa - 15PECC203 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region - 15PECC334 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic problems and policies in modern China - 15PECC035 (1 Unit) - Full Year The political economy of development in Africa - 15PECH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Politics and International Studies Department Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Politics of Globalisation and Development in Asia and Africa - 15PPOC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year School of Law Human Rights in The Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit) - Full Year Water Law: Justice and Governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropology and Sociology Department Therapy and Culture - 15PANH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Department of the Languages and Cultures of Japan and Korea North Korea since 1945: the rise and decline of an East Asian developmental state - 15PJKH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Study of Religions Religions and Development - 15PSRH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Materials SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Teaching & Learning Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Destinations A postgraduate degree from the Department of Development Studies at SOAS will further develop your understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised, with an emphasis on transferable analytical skill. These skills have been of great benefit to the many graduates who have taken up professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. This, in addition to your detailed subject knowledge, will also equip you with a set of other specific skills, including: critical skills; the ability to research extensively; a high level of cultural awareness; and the ability to solve problems. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Amnesty International BBC World Service British Embassy Brussels Department for International Development Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) Embassy of Japan Government of Pakistan Hong Kong Economic & Trade Office International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) International Labour Organization (ILO) KPMG LLP National Health and Medical Research Council Overseas Development Institute Oxfam Public Sector Reform Unit - Government of Sierra Leone Republic of Mozambique National Parliament Royal Norwegian Embassy Save the Children UK The World Bank Thinking Beyond Borders U.S. Department of State UN World Food Programme UN High Commissioner for Refugees WaterAid Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Chief Economist Global Communications Director Director for Climate Change and Environment Head of Research and Consultancies Development Director Regional OVC programme coordinator Head of Operations Country Director Bureau Chief Desk Officer on Pakistan Affairs Policy Analyst Partnership Liaison Officer Fundraising and Communications Manager Development Policy Officer Environmental Economist Journalist Human Rights Officer Country Director - Indonesia Relationship Banker - Africa Desk Policy Analyst/Economist A Student's Perspective "The campus is just one big condensed version of the globe itself for students from all kinds of ethnic and professional backgrounds!" Heidemarie Jahn [-]

MSc Development Studies (Central Asia Pathway)

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Students taking the Central Asia Pathway will develop a specialist understanding of Development Studies in the context of Central Asia. Development issues in Central Asia are a major focus of NGO and international organisations that work in Central Asia. SOAS' recognised strengths in this area, including the establishment of the Centre of Contemporary Central Asia and the Caucasus, makes this a unique and exciting opportunity for those interested in Central Asia. [+]

MSc Development Studies (Central Asia Pathway) Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Relevant work experience may also be considered. Subjects Preferred: Social Science Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? Applicants apply for the MSc Development Studies programme but can decide to follow the Central Asia Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab). We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, development issues in Central Asia. Students taking the Central Asia Pathway will develop a specialist understanding of Development Studies in the context of Central Asia. Development issues in Central Asia are a major focus of NGO and international organisations that work in Central Asia. SOAS' recognised strengths in this area, including the establishment of the Centre of Contemporary Central Asia and the Caucasus, makes this a unique and exciting opportunity for those interested in Central Asia. Structure Applicants apply for, and will be formally enrolled on, the MSc Development Studies programme. Students wishing to follow the Central Asia Pathway will take two core modules in Development Studies (Political Economy of Development and Theory, Policy and Practice of Development), two modules specific to Central Asia, and a dissertation (which must be written on a Central Asia-related topic). If the following combination of modules has been successfully completed, students may request that the following specialism appears on their final degree transcript: 'MSc Development Studies with special reference to Central Asia'. Political economy of development - 15PDSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory, policy and practice of development - 15PDSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year Geopolitics and Security in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 State and Society in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Dissertation in Development Studies - 15PDSC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Non-Assessed Courses All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics. Materials SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Teaching & Learning Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Destinations A postgraduate degree from the Department of Development Studies at SOAS will further develop your understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised, with an emphasis on transferable analytical skill. These skills have been of great benefit to the many graduates who have taken up professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. This, in addition to your detailed subject knowledge, will also equip you with a set of other specific skills, including: critical skills; the ability to research extensively; a high level of cultural awareness; and the ability to solve problems. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Amnesty International BBC World Service British Embassy Brussels Department for International Development Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) Embassy of Japan Government of Pakistan Hong Kong Economic & Trade Office International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) International Labour Organization (ILO) KPMG LLP National Health and Medical Research Council Overseas Development Institute Oxfam Public Sector Reform Unit - Government of Sierra Leone Republic of Mozambique National Parliament Royal Norwegian Embassy Save the Children UK The World Bank Thinking Beyond Borders U.S. Department of State UN World Food Programme UN High Commissioner for Refugees WaterAid Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Chief Economist Global Communications Director Director for Climate Change and Environment Head of Research and Consultancies Development Director Regional OVC programme coordinator Head of Operations Country Director Bureau Chief Desk Officer on Pakistan Affairs Policy Analyst Partnership Liaison Officer Fundraising and Communications Manager Development Policy Officer Environmental Economist Journalist Human Rights Officer Country Director - Indonesia Relationship Banker - Africa Desk Policy Analyst/Economist A Student's Perspective "I think the friends I’ve made are the most gratifying part of the study abroad experience. Some of my favourite memories of SOAS come from the late night conversations shared over mugs of tea with my flatmates. Though classes and academics are an important facet of studying at SOAS, I am just so impressed with a number of other SOAS students." Jason Hill, Tufts University [-]

MSc Development Studies (Contemporary India Pathway)

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Students taking the Contemporary India Pathway will develop a specialist understanding of Development Studies in the context of Contemporary India. Development issues in Contemporary India are a major focus of NGO and international organisations that work in the India. SOAS' recognised strengths in this area, including the establishment of the SOAS South Asia Institute, makes this a unique and exciting opportunity for those interested in Contemporary India. [+]

MSc Development Studies (Contemporary India Pathway) Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Relevant work experience may also be considered. Subjects Preferred: Social Science Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? Applicants apply for the MSc Development Studies programme but can decide to follow the Contemporary India Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab). We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, development issues in Contemporary India. Students taking the Contemporary India Pathway will develop a specialist understanding of Development Studies in the context of Contemporary India. Development issues in Contemporary India are a major focus of NGO and international organisations that work in the India. SOAS' recognised strengths in this area, including the establishment of the SOAS South Asia Institute, makes this a unique and exciting opportunity for those interested in Contemporary India. Structure Applicants apply for, and will be formally enrolled on, the MSc Development Studies programme. Students wishing to follow the Contemporary India Pathway will take two core modules in Development Studies (Political Economy of Development and Theory, Policy and Practice of Development), one module specific to Contemporary India and a dissertation (which must be written on a Contemporary India-related topic). The dissertation will include the option of undertaking a 2-4 week internship during the summer months, either arranged by the student to be approved by the Convenor or, through the Careers Office who have a database of organisations offering internship positions in India. If the following combination of modules has been successfully completed, students may request that the following specialism appears on their final degree transcript: 'MSc Development Studies with special reference to Contemporary India'. Political economy of development - 15PDSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory, policy and practice of development - 15PDSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year Contemporary India: Issues, Methods and Approaches - 15PAIC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Development Studies - 15PDSC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Non-Assessed Courses All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics. Materials SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Teaching & Learning Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Destinations A postgraduate degree from the Department of Development Studies at SOAS will further develop your understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised, with an emphasis on transferable analytical skill. These skills have been of great benefit to the many graduates who have taken up professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. This, in addition to your detailed subject knowledge, will also equip you with a set of other specific skills, including: critical skills; the ability to research extensively; a high level of cultural awareness; and the ability to solve problems. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Amnesty International BBC World Service British Embassy Brussels Department for International Development Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) Embassy of Japan Government of Pakistan Hong Kong Economic & Trade Office International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) International Labour Organization (ILO) KPMG LLP National Health and Medical Research Council Overseas Development Institute Oxfam Public Sector Reform Unit - Government of Sierra Leone Republic of Mozambique National Parliament Royal Norwegian Embassy Save the Children UK The World Bank Thinking Beyond Borders U.S. Department of State UN World Food Programme UN High Commissioner for Refugees WaterAid Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Chief Economist Global Communications Director Director for Climate Change and Environment Head of Research and Consultancies Development Director Regional OVC programme coordinator Head of Operations Country Director Bureau Chief Desk Officer on Pakistan Affairs Policy Analyst Partnership Liaison Officer Fundraising and Communications Manager Development Policy Officer Environmental Economist Journalist Human Rights Officer Country Director - Indonesia Relationship Banker - Africa Desk Policy Analyst/Economist A Student's Perspective "I think the friends I’ve made are the most gratifying part of the study abroad experience. Some of my favourite memories of SOAS come from the late night conversations shared over mugs of tea with my flatmates. Though classes and academics are an important facet of studying at SOAS, I am just so impressed with a number of other SOAS students." Jason Hill, Tufts University [-]

MSc Development Studies (Palestine Pathway)

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Students taking the Palestine Pathway will develop a specialist understanding of Development Studies in the context of Palestine. Development issues in Palestine are a major focus of NGO and international organisations that work in the Middle East. SOAS' recognised strengths in this area, including the establishment of the Centre for Palestine Studies, makes this a unique and exciting opportunity for those interested in Palestine. [+]

MSc Development Studies (Palestine Pathway) Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Relevant work experience may also be considered. Subjects Preferred: Social Science Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? Applicants apply for the MSc Development Studies programme but can decide to follow the Palestine Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab). We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, development issues in Palestine. Students taking the Palestine Pathway will develop a specialist understanding of Development Studies in the context of Palestine. Development issues in Palestine are a major focus of NGO and international organisations that work in the Middle East. SOAS' recognised strengths in this area, including the establishment of the Centre for Palestine Studies, makes this a unique and exciting opportunity for those interested in Palestine. Structure Applicants apply for, and will be formally enrolled on, the MSc Development Studies programme. Students wishing to follow the Palestine Pathway will take two core modules in Development Studies (Political Economy of Development and Theory, Policy and Practice of Development), two modules specific to Palestine and a dissertation (which must be written on a Palestine-related topic). If the following combination of modules has been successfully completed, students may request that the following specialism appears on their final degree transcript: 'MSc Development Studies with special reference to Palestine'. Political economy of development - 15PDSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory, policy and practice of development - 15PDSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies I: History and Politics - 15PNMH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies II: Culture and Society - 15PNMH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Dissertation in Development Studies - 15PDSC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Non-Assessed Courses All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics. Materials SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Teaching & Learning Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Destinations A postgraduate degree from the Department of Development Studies at SOAS will further develop your understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised, with an emphasis on transferable analytical skill. These skills have been of great benefit to the many graduates who have taken up professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. This, in addition to your detailed subject knowledge, will also equip you with a set of other specific skills, including: critical skills; the ability to research extensively; a high level of cultural awareness; and the ability to solve problems. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Amnesty International BBC World Service British Embassy Brussels Department for International Development Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) Embassy of Japan Government of Pakistan Hong Kong Economic & Trade Office International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) International Labour Organization (ILO) KPMG LLP National Health and Medical Research Council Overseas Development Institute Oxfam Public Sector Reform Unit - Government of Sierra Leone Republic of Mozambique National Parliament Royal Norwegian Embassy Save the Children UK The World Bank Thinking Beyond Borders U.S. Department of State UN World Food Programme UN High Commissioner for Refugees WaterAid Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Chief Economist Global Communications Director Director for Climate Change and Environment Head of Research and Consultancies Development Director Regional OVC programme coordinator Head of Operations Country Director Bureau Chief Desk Officer on Pakistan Affairs Policy Analyst Partnership Liaison Officer Fundraising and Communications Manager Development Policy Officer Environmental Economist Journalist Human Rights Officer Country Director - Indonesia Relationship Banker - Africa Desk Policy Analyst/Economist A Student's Perspective "Before I came to SOAS, I knew that my grade would depend on either one or two large assignments and I was apprehensive about that—almost scared, however I am glad as I got to learn a lot about myself as a student. I became more independent academically and got to see what I can really accomplished without teachers “coddling” me along the way. Extremely refreshing!" Tamara Bah, American University, Washington [-]

MSc Economics

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme is distinctive in its commitment to provide training in both mainstream economics and heterodox alternative theories and methods, quantitative skills, and application to a variety of contemporary topics and global economic issues. This reflects one of our key institutional roles in leading the debates in political economy and pluralistic economics. It also places applied focus on policy engagements and their theory foundations, drawing on our strengths and expertise in those areas. [+]

This programme is distinctive in its commitment to provide training in both mainstream economics and heterodox alternative theories and methods, quantitative skills, and application to a variety of contemporary topics and global economic issues. This reflects one of our key institutional roles in leading the debates in political economy and pluralistic economics. It also places applied focus on policy engagements and their theory foundations, drawing on our strengths and expertise in those areas. This programme will equip you with the specialist knowledge required by international employers in both the business and public sectors; as well as providing rigorous foundations for those who wish to go on to research in economics at the PhD level. This programme is distinctive in its commitment to provide trainnig in both mainstream economics and heterodox alternative theories and methods, quantitative skills, and application to a variety of contemporary topics and global economic issues. This reflects one of our key institutional roles in leading the debates in political economy and pluralistic economics. It also places applied focus on policy engagements and their theory foundations, drawing on our strenghts and expertise in those areas. This programme will equip you with the specialist knowledge required by international employers in both the business and public sectors; as well as providing rigorous foundations for those who wish to go on to do research in economics at the PhD level. Teaching & Learning The MSc Economics consists of six core modules and two optional modules, each worth 15 credits. four of the core modules over microeconomic and macroeconomic theories, while the other two core modules give training in quantitative methods. In additions, an MSc dissertation focusing on general economic theory, policy and/or the history of economic analysis accounts for 60 credits. The modules are taught in seminar groups and lectures. The degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. The MSc is taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study withing a structured programme. In case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years. For a two year study, four modules are studies each year, with the dissertation normally being completed in the second year, while the number of modules taken is decided in consultation with the programme convenor for a three year study. Lectures: Most courses involve a 2-hour lecture as a key component with linked seminar or tutorial classes. Seminars: At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation: Students are required to complete an 8,000-word dissertation focusing on general economic theory, policy and/or the history of economic analysis accounts Pre Entry Reading Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Module Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary module in mathematics, statistics and computing. The objective of the module is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commence. This module is compulsory. Further details please visit the Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics page. Employment Graduates of Masters programmes in the Department of Economic at SOAS have followed successful careers in international banking and finance, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-governmental organisations. The MSc Economics provides rigorous foundations for students to go on to undertake research in economics at the PhD level. [-]

MSc Economics with reference to Africa

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Students on the MSc Economics with reference to Africa will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must complete two courses dedicated to the study of the economics of Africa, one focusing on microeconomic issues, the other on macroeconomic issues, as well as an optional module and a dissertation in applied economics with a focus on one or more African countries. [+]

MSc Economics with reference to Africa Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two or Three years (part-time, daytime only). We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their studies. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Economics. Applicants without a first degree in Economics may be admitted to the Diploma in Economics in the first instance. Satisfactory completion of the Diploma, at a level acceptable to the School, may allow students to take the MSc in the following year. All students must complete and pass the preliminary Mathematics and Statistics course which is taught over three weeks in August/September before the start of the MSc. Start of programme: September intake only All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Economics with reference to Africa will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must complete two courses dedicated to the study of the economics of Africa, one focusing on microeconomic issues, the other on macroeconomic issues, as well as an optional module and a dissertation in applied economics with a focus on one or more African countries. The objectives of the programme are: To enable students to apply the principles of economic analysis to the design of economic policy with reference to Africa To teach postgraduates the technical and analytical skills to qualify them to practice as professional economists To enable practising professional economists to improve and update their skills and knowledge To impart the skills and knowledge that enable students to progress towards PhD research Students will benefit from studying with experts on African economics within the Department. More broadly, a large number of open lectures on topics relating to Africa will be available in various departments of the School throughout the year. All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. The following is a complete list of courses in the programme, not all of which are offered in any single year. Core Courses Macroeconomics - 15PECC005 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Microeconomics - 15PECC006 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Growth & development - 15PECC007 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Quantitative methods I - 15PECC008 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Quantitative methods II - 15PECC045 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Dissertation for MSc Economics programmes - 15PECC998 (0.8 Unit) - Full Year Students May Choose Two of the Following Regional Courses: African economies 1: applied microeconomic analysis - 15PECC024 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 African economies 2: applied macroeconomic analysis - 15PECC025 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 And One from the Following: Economics of environment and development - 15PECC048 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Capital markets, derivatives & corporate finance - 15PECC011 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Financial systems and economic development - 15PECC036 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 History of Economic Analysis - 15PECH006 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 International Trade and Investment - 15PECC018 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 International Finance - 15PECC019 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Political Economy of Agriculture and Food - 15PECC049 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Marxist political economy and world development - 15PECC047 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Political economy of institutions - 15PECC020 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Quantitative Methods III - 15PECC051 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Theory of financial institutions & policy - 15PECC021 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Teaching & Learning The MSc includes eight taught modules plus a preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics and an 8,000-word dissertation. The courses are taught in seminar groups and lectures. The degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. The MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years. Four modules are studied each year, with the dissertation normally being completed in the second year. Lectures Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation Students are required to complete an 8,000-word dissertation in applied economics. Learning Resources SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Pre Entry Reading Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative courses are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative courses focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs. Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary course in mathematics, statistics and computing. The objective of the course is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This course is compulsory. Further details on the Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Economics with reference to Africa from SOAS equips students with a range of important skills to continue in the field of research as well as a portfolio of widely transferable employability skills valued by a wide range of employers. These include numeracy, analytical thinking and general skills such as organisation and effective communication skills. Graduates will develop their regional expertise and understanding of the African market. In addition the study of Economics gives students particular problem solving skills including: abstraction, analysis, quantification, strategic thinking and adaptability. Postgraduate students from the SOAS MSc in Economics with reference to Africa have followed successful careers in both academic work and also in international banking and financial analysis, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-government organisations. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. In addition the study of Economics gives students particular problem solving skills including: abstraction, analysis, quantification, strategic thinking and adaptability. Graduates of Masters programmes in the Department of Economics at SOAS have followed successful careers in international banking and finance, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-governmental organisations. Graduates have been very successful in gaining highly competitive Overseas Development Institute (ODI) fellowships which have allowed them to work in government agencies in countries ranging from Mozambique to Papua New Guinea. A Student's Perspective "I chose to study at SOAS because it is a well recognised educational institution and a leader in the study of emerging regions of the world such as the Middle East, Africa and Asia which, in my view, is a necessity in a globalised world." Bashir Ali [-]

MSc Economics with reference to Environment and Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme combines environmental concerns with development economics and political economy. It draws on the specific strengths of SOAS, namely expertise in development economics, multi-disciplinary environmental focus, and area specialisations in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. [+]

MSc Economics with reference to Environment and Development Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two or Three years (part-time, daytime only). We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their ccourse of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Economics. Applicants without a first degree in Economics may be admitted to the Diploma in Economics in the fi rst instance. Satisfactory completion of the Diploma, at a level acceptable to the School, may allow students to take the MSc in the following year. For details see www.soas.ac.uk/economics All students must complete and pass the Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics course which is taught over three weeks in August/September before the start of the MSc. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full-time This programme combines environmental concerns with development economics and political economy. It draws on the specific strengths of SOAS, namely expertise in development economics, multi-disciplinary environmental focus, and area specialisations in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. The MSc in Economics with reference to Environment and Development provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of economics. The effects of development on the environment and access to resources is one of the most challenging fields that has grown over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of study. At SOAS, we understand the environment in a broad sense and the scope of courses offered includes various areas such as natural resources, agriculture, economic development, finance, and regionally - specialised courses. All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. Structure The MSc Environment and Development is taught within a structured programme rather than being obtained mainly by research and dissertation. It consists of eight course modules delivered through lectures, classes, and tutorials and an 8,000-word dissertation. The degree is awarded on the basis of course work, examinations written in May/June, and a dissertation which is submitted in September. The following is a complete list of courses in the programme, not all of which are offered in any single year. To see a list of courses being offered please visit the relevant departmental website or contact the Faculty office. Please note that some courses may be taught in other departments of the School. Core Courses Economics of environment and development - 15PECC048 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Macroeconomics - 15PECC005 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Microeconomics - 15PECC006 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Political Economy of Agriculture and Food - 15PECC049 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Quantitative methods I - 15PECC008 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Quantitative methods II - 15PECC045 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Dissertation for MSc Economics programmes - 15PECC998 (0.8 Unit) - Full Year And Two from the Following: African economies 1: applied microeconomic analysis - 15PECC024 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 African economies 2: applied macroeconomic analysis - 15PECC025 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Applied economics of the Middle East 1 - 15PECC028 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Applied economics of the Middle East 2 - 15PECC029 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Capital markets, derivatives & corporate finance - 15PECC011 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Economic development of the Asia Pacific region 1 - 15PECC030 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Economic development of the Asia Pacific region 2 - 15PECC031 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Economic development of South Asia a) the macroeconomy - 15PECC026 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Economic development of South Asia b) major sectors & the internationa - 15PECC027 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Financial systems and economic development - 15PECC036 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Growth & development - 15PECC007 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 History of Economic Analysis - 15PECH006 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 International Trade and Investment - 15PECC018 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 International Finance - 15PECC019 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Marxist political economy and world development - 15PECC047 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Political economy of institutions - 15PECC020 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Quantitative Methods III - 15PECC051 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Theory of financial institutions & policy - 15PECC021 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Teaching & Learning The MSc includes eight taught modules plus a preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics and an 8,000-word dissertation. The courses are taught in seminar groups and lectures. The degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. The MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years. Four modules are studied each year, with the dissertation normally being completed in the second year. Lectures Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation Students are required to complete an 8,000-word dissertation in applied economics. Learning Resources SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Pre Entry Reading Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative courses are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative courses focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs. Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary course in mathematics, statistics and computing. The objective of the course is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This course is compulsory. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Economics with reference to Environment and Development from SOAS equips students with a range of important skills to continue in the field of research as well as a portfolio of widely transferable employability skills valued by a wide range of employers. These include numeracy, analytical thinking and general skills such as organisation and effective communication skills. Graduates of this programme will develop a specialised understanding of the environmental and development concerns. In addition the study of Economics gives students particular problem solving skills including: abstraction, analysis, quantification, strategic thinking and adaptability. Postgraduate students from the SOAS MSc in Economics with reference to Environment and Development have followed successful careers in both academic work and also in international banking and financial analysis, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-government organisations. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates of Masters programmes in the Department of Economics at SOAS have followed successful careers in international banking and finance, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-governmental organisations. Graduates have been very successful in gaining highly competitive Overseas Development Institute (ODI) fellowships which have allowed them to work in government agencies in countries ranging from Mozambique to Papua New Guinea. A Student's Perspective "I chose to study at SOAS because of the interesting course options that cover pertinent topics other leading institutions are yet to cover." Mariam Iqbal [-]

MSc Economics with reference to South Asia

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Students on the MSc Economics with reference to South Asia will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must complete two courses dedicated to the study of the economics of South Asia, as well as an optional module and a dissertation in applied economics with a focus on one or more countries of South Asia. [+]

MSc Economics with reference to South Asia Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two or Three years (part-time, daytime only). We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Economics. Applicants without a first degree in Economics may be admitted to the Diploma in Economics in the first instance. Satisfactory completion of the Diploma, at a level acceptable to the School, may allow students to take the MSc in the following year. For details see www.soas.ac.uk/economics All students must complete and pass the Prelimianry Mathematics and Statistics course which is taught over three weeks in August/ September before the start of the MSc. Start of programme: September intake only All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Economics with reference to South Asia will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must complete two courses dedicated to the study of the economics of South Asia, as well as an optional module and a dissertation in applied economics with a focus on one or more countries of South Asia. The objectives of the programme are: To enable students to apply the principles of economic analysis to the design of economic policy with reference to South Asia To teach postgraduates the technical and analytical skills to qualify them to practice as professional economists To enable practising professional economists to improve and update their skills and knowledge To impart the skills and knowledge that enable students to progress towards PhD research Students will benefit from studying with experts on the economics of South Asia within the Department. More broadly, a large number of open lectures on topics relating to South Asia will be available in various departments of the School throughout the year. All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. For further information about this course including a timetable please see here: Preliminary maths and Statistics Course. Structure The following is a complete list of courses in the programme, not all of which are offered in any single year. Please note that some courses may be taught in other departments of the School. Core Courses Macroeconomics - 15PECC005 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Microeconomics - 15PECC006 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Growth & development - 15PECC007 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Quantitative methods I - 15PECC008 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Quantitative methods II - 15PECC045 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Dissertation for MSc Economics programmes - 15PECC998 (0.8 Unit) - Full Year Students May Choose Two of the Following Regional Courses: Economic development of South Asia a) the macroeconomy - 15PECC026 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Economic development of South Asia b) major sectors & the internationa - 15PECC027 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 And One from the Following: Capital markets, derivatives & corporate finance - 15PECC011 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Economics of environment and development - 15PECC048 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 International Trade and Investment - 15PECC018 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Financial systems and economic development - 15PECC036 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 History of Economic Analysis - 15PECH006 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 International Finance - 15PECC019 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Marxist political economy and world development - 15PECC047 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Political Economy of Agriculture and Food - 15PECC049 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Political economy of institutions - 15PECC020 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Quantitative Methods III - 15PECC051 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Theory of financial institutions & policy - 15PECC021 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Teaching & Learning The MSc includes eight taught modules plus a preliminay course in Mathematics and Statistics and an 8,000-word dissertation. The courses are taught in seminar groups and lectures. The degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. The MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years. Four modules are studied each year, with the dissertation normally being completed in the second year. Lectures Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation Students are required to complete an 8,000-word dissertation in applied economics. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Pre Entry Reading Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative courses are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative courses focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs. Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary course in mathematics, statistics and computing. The objective of the course is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This course is compulsory Mathematics And Statistics (preliminary) Destinations A postgraduate degree in Economics with reference to South Asia from SOAS equips students with a range of important skills to continue in the field of research as well as a portfolio of widely transferable employability skills valued by a wide range of employers. These include numeracy, analytical thinking and general skills such as organisation and effective communication skills. Graduates will develop their regional expertise and understanding of the South Asian market. In addition the study of Economics gives students particular problem solving skills including: abstraction, analysis, quantification, strategic thinking and adaptability. Postgraduate students from the SOAS MSc in Economics with reference to South Asia have followed successful careers in both academic work and also in international banking and financial analysis, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-government organisations. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. SOAS MSc graduates have been very successful in gaining highly competitive Overseas Development Institute (ODI) fellowships which have allowed them to work in government agencies in countries ranging from Mozambique to Papua New Guinea. A Student's Perspective "Along with academic excellence, the diversity of this institution makes it a remarkable place and provides us with a great cosmopolitan environment." Mirza Saad Anjum [-]

MSc Economics with reference to the Asia Pacific Region

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Students on the MSc Economics with reference to the Asia Pacific Region will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must complete two courses dedicated to the study of the economics of the Asia Pacific Region, as well as an optional module and a dissertation in applied economics with a focus on one or more countries of the Asia Pacific Region. [+]

MSc Economics with reference to the Asia Pacific Region Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or Three years (part-time, daytime only). We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Economics. Applicants without a first degree in Economics may be admitted to the Diploma in Economics in the fi rst instance. Satisfactory completion of the Diploma, at a level acceptable to the School, may allow students to take the MSc in the following year. For details see www.soas.ac.uk/economics All students must complete and pass the Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics course which is taught over three weeks in August/September before the start of the MSc. Start of programme: September intake only All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Economics with reference to the Asia Pacific Region will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must complete two courses dedicated to the study of the economics of the Asia Pacific Region, as well as an optional module and a dissertation in applied economics with a focus on one or more countries of the Asia Pacific Region. The objectives of the programme are: To enable students to apply the principles of economic analysis to the design of economic policy with reference to the Asia Pacific Region To teach postgraduates the technical and analytical skills to qualify them to practice as professional economists To enable practising professional economists to improve and update their skills and knowledge To impart the skills and knowledge that enable students to progress towards PhD research Students will benefit from studying with experts on the economics of the Asia Pacific Region within the Department. More broadly, a large number of open lectures on topics relating to the Asia Pacific Region will be available in various departments of the School throughout the year. All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. Structure The MSc Economics is taught within a structured programme rather than being obtained mainly by research and dissertation. It consists of eight course modules delivered through lectures, classes, and tutorials and an 8,000-word dissertation. The degree is awarded on the basis of course work, examinations written in May/June, and a dissertation which is submitted in September. The following is a complete list of courses in the programme, not all of which are offered in any single year. To see a list of courses being offered please visit the relevant departmental website or contact the Faculty office. Please note that some courses may be taught in other departments of the School. Core Courses Macroeconomics - 15PECC005 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Microeconomics - 15PECC006 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Growth & development - 15PECC007 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Quantitative methods I - 15PECC008 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Quantitative methods II - 15PECC045 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Dissertation for MSc Economics programmes - 15PECC998 (0.8 Unit) - Full Year Regional Courses Economic development of the Asia Pacific region 1 - 15PECC030 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Economic development of the Asia Pacific region 2 - 15PECC031 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 And one from the Following Capital markets, derivatives & corporate finance - 15PECC011 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Economics of environment and development - 15PECC048 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Financial systems and economic development - 15PECC036 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 History of Economic Analysis - 15PECH006 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 International Trade and Investment - 15PECC018 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 International Finance - 15PECC019 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Marxist political economy and world development - 15PECC047 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Political Economy of Agriculture and Food - 15PECC049 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Political economy of institutions - 15PECC020 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Quantitative Methods III - 15PECC051 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Theory of financial institutions & policy - 15PECC021 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Teaching & Learning The MSc includes eight taught modules plus a preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics and an 8,000-word dissertation. The courses are taught in seminar groups and lectures. The degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. The MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years. Four modules are studied each year, with the dissertation normally being completed in the second year. Lectures Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation Students are required to complete an 8,000-word dissertation in applied economics. Learning Resources SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Pre Entry Reading Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative courses are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative courses focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs. Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary course in mathematics, statistics and computing. The objective of the course is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This course is compulsory. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Economics with reference to the Middle East from SOAS equips students with a range of important skills to continue in the field of research as well as a portfolio of widely transferable employability skills valued by a wide range of employers. These include numeracy, analytical thinking and general skills such as organisation and effective communication skills. Graduates will develop their regional expertise and understanding of the Middle East. In addition the study of Economics gives students particular problem solving skills including: abstraction, analysis, quantification, strategic thinking and adaptability. Postgraduate students from the SOAS MSc in Economics with reference to the Middle East have followed successful careers in both academic work and also in international banking and financial analysis, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-government organisations. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. SOAS MSc graduates have been very successful in gaining highly competitive Overseas Development Institute (ODI) fellowships which have allowed them to work in government agencies in countries ranging from Mozambique to Papua New Guinea. A Student's Perspective "Highly regarded as one of the best educational institutions in the world, SOAS offers world class regional modules in economics and politics in the region of Asia, Africa and the Middle East" Yousef Mahmoud [-]

MSc Economics with reference to the Middle East

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 United Kingdom London

All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Economics with reference to the Middle East will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must complete two courses dedicated to the study of the economics of MENA, as well as an optional module and a dissertation in applied economics with a focus on one or more countries of the Middle East. [+]

Start of programme: September intake only All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Economics with reference to the Middle East will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must complete two courses dedicated to the study of the economics of MENA, as well as an optional module and a dissertation in applied economics with a focus on one or more countries of the Middle East. The objectives of the programme are: To enable students to apply the principles of economic analysis to the design of economic policy with reference to the Middle East To teach postgraduates the technical and analytical skills to qualify them to practice as professional economists To enable practising professional economists to improve and update their skills and knowledge To impart the skills and knowledge that enable students to progress towards PhD research Students will benefit from studying with experts on the economics of the Middle East within the Department. More broadly, a large number of open lectures on topics relating to the Middle East will be available in various departments of the School throughout the year. All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. For further information about this course including a timetable please see here: Preliminary maths and Statistics Course. For further details of entry requirements, duration, fees, and course structure, please visit SOAS website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msceconme/ [-]

MSc Environment, Politics and Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The programme attracts applications from students with a variety of academic and experiential backgrounds. We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, environment-development issues. A good first degree in a social science is preferred. [+]

MSc Environment, Politics and Development Programme Code: PGTF0039/PGTP0059/PGTP0060 Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Relevant work experience may also be considered. Subjects Preferred: Social Science Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? The programme attracts applications from students with a variety of academic and experiential backgrounds. We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, environment-development issues. A good first degree in a social science is preferred. This programme takes a critical political ecology frame and examines environmental policy and its intersections with development from a social justice angle. It is taught and convened by leading political ecologists and offers a critical analysis of key issues including water, forestry, climate, fisheries, agricultural production, biodiversity, conflicts and energy supply. The masters asks important questions including: How does the environment intersect with global poverty, wealth and questions of inequality? Can Carbon trading offer a solution to managing climate change? How does access to water intersect with dynamics of wealth and poverty? Is wildlife conservation implicated in social injustices? What role can and do environmental movements play in development? Is there a link between environmental change and violent conflict? What is the political ecology of forests? The MSc programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills has been of great benefit to the many graduates who have returned to, or taken up, professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the Department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes. The MSc Environment, Politics and Development has four components: two compulsory modules; one full-module option or two half-module options; and a dissertation of 10,000 words. Please see Postgraduate Modules for details on core and optional modules taught within the Department. Structure Overview There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Ecology of Development. They then select one of four further core modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development; or Law and Natural Resources. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. Specialisation Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of environment, politics and development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals. Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure. Core Modules All students take Political Ecology of Development. Then select either Political Economy of Development, Theory, Policy and Practice of Development, Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development or Law and Natural Resources. The dissertation is compulsory. Political Ecology of Development - 15PDSC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Political economy of development - 15PDSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory, policy and practice of development - 15PDSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year Political economy of violence, conflict and development - 15PDSC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Development Studies - 15PDSC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Non-Assessed Courses All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics. Optional Modules Agrarian Development, Food Policy and Rural Poverty - 15PDSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Aid and development - 15PDSH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Borders and Development - 15PDSH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Civil society, social movements and the development process - 15PDSH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Natural resources, development and change: putting critical analysis into practice - 15PDSH031 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Development practice - 15PDSH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Environment, Governance and Development - 15PDSH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Extractive Industries, Energy, Biofuels and Development in a Time of Climate Change - 15PDSH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Famine and food security - 15PDSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Fundamentals of research methods for Development Studies - 15PDSH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global commodity chains, production networks and informal work - 15PDSH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global Health and Development - 15PDSH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Issues in forced migration - 15PDSH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Marxist Political Economy and Global Development - 15PDSH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Migration and Policy - 15PDSH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Neoliberalism, Democracy and Global Development - 15PDSH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Problems of development in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PDSH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Security - 15PDSH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The working poor and development - 15PDSH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Understanding economic migration: Theories, Patterns and Policies - 15PDSH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Water and development:conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Open Options in Other Departments Politics and International Studies Department Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Politics of Globalisation and Development in Asia and Africa - 15PPOC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year School of Law Human Rights in The Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit) - Full Year Water Law: Justice and Governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 History Department Environmental History of Asia - 15PHIH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology and Sociology Department Anthropological approaches to agriculture, food and nutrition - 15PANH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Study of Religions Religions and Development - 15PSRH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy (CISD) Global Energy & Climate Policy - 15PFFC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific - 15PFFH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Materials SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.5 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Teaching & Learning Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. A Student's Perspective "The Department of Development Studies has a high calibre of lecturers and tutors with a wide range of backgrounds. My teachers have been really inspiring, and are always open to questions and feedback." Jessica Blomfield [-]

MSc Finance & Financial Law (Distance Learning)

Online Full time Part time August 2017 United Kingdom London

The rapid and wide-ranging changes occurring in financial markets around the world and in the legal and regulatory environment in which they operate has created a demand for people with expertise in both finance and financial law. This MSc takes an integrated approach to these two aspects by including risk management, regulation, mergers and acquisitions, initial public offerings, formation of companies and the bank-client relation, bond issues, and loans. It relates to both national and international finance and will introduce you to how financial and legal principles are applied in practice as well as in theory. [+]

Start of programme: November / February / April / June / August Mode of Attendance: Distance Learning The rapid and wide-ranging changes occurring in financial markets around the world and in the legal and regulatory environment in which they operate has created a demand for people with expertise in both finance and financial law. This MSc takes an integrated approach to these two aspects by including risk management, regulation, mergers and acquisitions, initial public offerings, formation of companies and the bank-client relation, bond issues, and loans. It relates to both national and international finance and will introduce you to how financial and legal principles are applied in practice as well as in theory. Find out more To find out more about this programme, including module details, fees and entry requirements, please visit the MSc Finance and Financial Law section of the Centre for Financial and Management Studies website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/cefims/programmes/mscfinfinlaw/ [-]

MSc Finance (Banking)

Campus Part time 2 - 5  August 2017 United Kingdom London

Gain the competitive edge in the banking sector [+]

This programme offers the opportunity to gain the expertise needed to enter and successfully compete in the banking sector developing your financial management skills in core banking activities (maturity/risks mismatch management) retirement and financial planning, commercial credit and factoring, and liquidity and risk management. The MSc Finance (Banking) is designed for postgraduates wanting to enter the banking sector and professionals already working in financial or neighbouring sectors who are looking to gain a competitive advantage while deepening their knowledge in financial management, particularly in core banking activities (maturity/risk mismatch management), retirement and financial planning, commercial credit and factoring, and liquidity and risk management. [-]

MSc Finance (Economic Policy) (Distance Learning

Online Full time Part time

This programme is principally for postgraduates working on economic policy in government, central banks, other public organisations, international institutions and consultancy. It will increase your understanding of the principles, applications, and context underlying economic policy, focusing on the financial aspects of policy making. [+]

Start of programme: November / February / April / June / August Mode of Attendance: Distance Learning This programme is principally for postgraduates working on economic policy in government, central banks, other public organisations, international institutions and consultancy. It will increase your understanding of the principles, applications, and context underlying economic policy, focusing on the financial aspects of policy making. Find out more To find out more about this programme, including module details, fees and entry requirements, please visit the MSc Finance (Economic Policy) section of the Centre for Financial and Management Studies website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/cefims/programmes/mscfinanceep/ [-]

MSc Finance (Financial Sector Management) (Distance Learning)

Online Full time Part time

Designed to advance a career in management within banks and other financial firms, this programme enables you to deepen your understanding of the principles, applications, and context underlying decision making in financial sector management. [+]

Start of programme: November / February / April / June / August Mode of Attendance: Distance Learning Designed to advance a career in management within banks and other financial firms, this programme enables you to deepen your understanding of the principles, applications, and context underlying decision making in financial sector management. Find out more To find out more about this programme, including module details, please visit the MSc Finance (Financial Sector Management) section of the Centre for Financial and Management Studies website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/cefims/programmes/mscfinancefsm/ [-]

MSc Finance (Major: Quantitative Finance) (Distance Learning

Online Full time Part time

The MSc Finance (Quantitative Finance) has been created principally for postgraduates whose work in banks and other financial institutions requires a knowledge of statistical (particularly econometric) and quantitative approaches to risk and derivatives. It is particularly suitable if you have a first degree in engineering, applied science, applied mathematics, economics, or similar subjects, but is also suitable for others with quantitative skills. [+]

Start of programme: November / February / April / June / August Mode of Attendance: Distance Learning The MSc Finance (Quantitative Finance) has been created principally for postgraduates whose work in banks and other financial institutions requires a knowledge of statistical (particularly econometric) and quantitative approaches to risk and derivatives. It is particularly suitable if you have a first degree in engineering, applied science, applied mathematics, economics, or similar subjects, but is also suitable for others with quantitative skills. Find out more To find out more about this programme, including module details, fees and entry requirements, please visit the MSc Finance (Quantitative Finance) section of the Centre for Financial and Management Studies website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/cefims/programmes/mscfinanceqf/ [-]

MSc Finance and Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme is designed for economists and financiers who are interested in exploring the relationship between national and international financial policies and practices and their impact on economic development. Anyone working, or wishing to work, for international organisations and/or in financial institutions with an interest in economic development would gain much from this programme. [+]

MSc Finance and Development Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two (part-time, daytime only). We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: At least upper second class or equivalent in Economics OR a joint degree containing Economics PLUS work experience in financial markets and development. Start of programme: September intake only Who is this programme for? This programme is designed for economists and financiers who are interested in exploring the relationship between national and international financial policies and practices and their impact on economic development. Anyone working, or wishing to work, for international organisations and/or in financial institutions with an interest in economic development would gain much from this programme. The programme includes 8 modules in macroeconomics, microeconomics, quantitative methods, international finance, corporate finance, derivatives and capital markets and financial systems in the context of economic development. Students will also complete a 10,000-word dissertation. All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. Structure All courses are compulsory: Microeconomics - 15PECC006 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Capital markets, derivatives & corporate finance - 15PECC011 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Financial systems and economic development - 15PECC036 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Quantitative methods I - 15PECC008 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Dissertation for MSc Economics programmes - 15PECC998 (0.8 Unit) - Full Year Macroeconomics - 15PECC005 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 International Finance - 15PECC019 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Quantitative methods II - 15PECC045 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Theory of financial institutions & policy - 15PECC021 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Teaching & Learning The MSc includes eight taught modules plus a preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics and an 8,000-word dissertation. The courses are taught in seminar groups and lectures. The degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. The MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two years. Four modules are studied each year, with the dissertation normally being completed in the second year. Lectures Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation Students are required to complete an 8,000-word dissertation in applied economics. Learning Resources SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Pre Entry Reading Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative courses are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative courses focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs. Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary course in mathematics, statistics and computing. The objective of the course is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This course is compulsory. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Finance and Development from SOAS equips students with a range of important skills to continue in the field of research as well as a portfolio of widely transferable employability skills valued by a wide range of employers. These include numeracy, analytical thinking and general skills such as organisation and effective communication skills. Graduates will develop their regional expertise and understanding of issues of development and the international financial market. In addition the study of Economics gives students particular problem solving skills including: abstraction, analysis, quantification, strategic thinking and adaptability. Postgraduate students from the SOAS MSc in Finance and Development have followed successful careers in both academic work and also in international banking and financial analysis, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-government organisations. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a place that accepts everyone for who they are, and where your individual talents are encouraged to shine. I do not regret my hesitant decision to come to SOAS, and hopefully, neither will you." Benita Ngere [-]

MSc Finance and Financial Law

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 United Kingdom London

This programme takes an integrated approach to finance and financial law, including risk management, regulation, mergers and acquisitions, initial public offerings, bond issues, and loans. In these fast changing subjects, the MSc Finance and Financial Law provides the specialist knowledge required in international banks and investment firms, legal practice, regulatory institutions and the academic world. The programme relates to both national and international finance, and considers how financial and legal principles are applied in the context of actual case studies. [+]

Start of programme: September intake only (a three-week pre-sessional course in September is a requirement) This programme takes an integrated approach to finance and financial law, including risk management, regulation, mergers and acquisitions, initial public offerings, bond issues, and loans. In these fast changing subjects, the MSc Finance and Financial Law provides the specialist knowledge required in international banks and investment firms, legal practice, regulatory institutions and the academic world. The programme relates to both national and international finance, and considers how financial and legal principles are applied in the context of actual case studies. Graduates from the MSc Finance and Financial Law will be well equipped for a career with a financial institution, a commercial law firm, regulator, government department or indeed in general business. Among the institutions with which our graduates are currently working are: Baronsmead Partners LLP; China Banking Regulatory Commission; Deloitte; JP Morgan Chase; Kleinwort Benson; KPMG; Merrill Lynch; Mograbi Real Estate, Israel; Rivers State Ministry of Finance, Nigeria; Telenor, Pakistan. For further details of entry requirements, duration, fees, and course structure, please visit SOAS website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/finance-and-management/programmes/mscfinfinlaw/ [-]

MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy

Campus Full time September 2017 United Kingdom London

The MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy is the most recent addition to the Department of Economics’ portfolio of masters programme. The programme builds on the department’s unique combination of expertise – in policy analysis, regional economics and critical theoretical perspectives – to provide students with an in-depth understanding of core policy debates in the area of global economic governance. [+]

MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper Second Honours degree in a relevant subject or discipline (UK), CGPA 3.3 for universities with a selective entry policy and CGPA 3.5 for universities with a non-selective entry policy, equivalent undergraduate degree classification from other countries. Relevant professional experience will be taken into consideration. Start of programme: September 2016 intake only Mode of Attendance: Full-time Who is this programme for? professionals with a strong interest and need in gaining a thorough academic foundation in, and understanding of, current developments in the area of global economic governance. graduate students from other disciplinary backgrounds wishing to further their understanding of global economic policy issues and debates through systematic academic study. economics graduate students wishing to specialize in global economic policy and governance. Prior knowledge of economics is not a requirement. The MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy is the most recent addition to the Department of Economics’ portfolio of masters programme. The programme builds on the department’s unique combination of expertise – in policy analysis, regional economics and critical theoretical perspectives – to provide students with an in-depth understanding of core policy debates in the area of global economic governance. Specifically, the programme focuses on: global economic governance: It offers in-depth specialisation in this area of wider global governance. economic policy: It provides high-level training in the understanding and critical evaluation of economic policy issues, design and solutions, their foundation in the evolution of economic theory and methods, as well as critical discussion of the application of policy design to real-world problems, such as issues of implementation and monitoring. regional specificities within the global economy: It provides a differentiated analysis of problems of global economic governance from a range of regional perspectives, in advanced as well as developing country regions. The programme is taught through two dedicated core courses (Global Economic Governance I: Global Economic Policy Debates and Analysis and Global Economic Governance II: Institutional and Governance Debates on Economic Development and Growth). In addition, students can choose from a wide range of optional courses and will write a 10.000 word dissertation. Structure The MSc in Global Economic Governance and Policy is a new masters programme designed for professionals and postgraduate students, with or without a prior background in economics, who wish to gain a focused and in-depth understanding of contemporary economic governance and policy debates. The MSc is taught through two dedicated core courses. The first, Global Economic Governance 1 deals with issues of Global Economic Policy. This covers international trade and investment relationships between countries, trade and industrial policies, global capital markets, the international monetary and financial system, multinationals, global production networks and labour in the global economy. The second core paper, Global Economic Governance 2 deals with issues of institutions and governance. This includes issues of governance reforms for developing countries, the theory of institutional economics informing these debates, the policy and theoretical debates around property rights reforms, anti-corruption, industrial policy, rents and rent seeking, democratization and related governance issues. In addition, students will choose one, two or three optional courses, depending on the weight of the courses (see the list below), from across a range of SOAS departments plus a 10,000 word dissertation. Students can, but do not have to, choose a course structure that, in addition to the programme’s focus on policy analysis and training, provides research method training. Core Courses Global Economic Policy Analysis - 15PECC063 (1 Unit) - Full Year Institutions and Governance - 15PECC064 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Global Economic Governance and Policy - 15PECC996 (1 Unit) - Full Year Optional Courses MSc GEGP students can choose either one (1 unit) course or two (0.5 unit) courses or three (0.33 unit courses) to make up a total of 1 unit from the following list of courses by department. The availability of open option courses in other FL&SS departments from the below list is conditional on the approval of individual course convenors as well as the usual restrictions with regard to pre-requisites, timetable compatibilities and availability of individual courses in any one academic year. Students should note that some courses are capped in terms of student numbers, and that students from home departments will be given priority in case the relevant caps are reached. All law courses are open only for students with an LLB or who take the Law pre-sessional course offered by the School of Law at SOAS. Economics Department MSc GEGP students will be eligible to take any of the post-graduate courses offered in the Economics Department, pending permission by the course convenors on the basis of the students’ prior academic qualifications in economics. Economics options with CATS 22.5 (0.5 unit) modules will be made available subject to approval. List of 1 unit options Choose ONE optional module from the following list: Economics Economic development in Africa - 15PECC203 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic development of the Middle East - 15PECC341 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region - 15PECC334 (1 Unit) - Full Year Development Studies Department Political economy of violence, conflict and development - 15PDSC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory, policy and practice of development - 15PDSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year School of Law International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in The Global Village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit) - Full Year International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law, Environmental and Sustainable Development in a Global Context - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit) - Full Year International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit) - Full Year International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Law and International Inequality:Critical Legal Analysis of Political Economy From Colonialism to Globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit) - Full Year Multinational Enterprises and The Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit) - Full Year Politics China and international politics - 15PPOC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Government and politics of modern South East Asia - 15PPOC247 (1 Unit) - Full Year International politics of East Asia - 15PPOC251 (1 Unit) - Full Year International politics of Africa - 15PPOC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 International Politics Of The Middle East - (Full unit Unit) Northeast Asian politics: Japan, Korea and Taiwan - 15PPOC253 (1 Unit) - Full Year Politics of Globalisation and Development in Asia and Africa - 15PPOC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year State and society in the Chinese political process - 15PPOC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year State & society in Asia & Africa - 15PPOC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year List of 0.5 unit options Choose TWO 0.5 unit modules (to make up a total of 1 unit ) from the following list: Economics Applied Economics of the middle East 1 (MSc GEG) - 15PECH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Applied Economics of the middle East 2 (MSc GEG) - 15PECH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 African Economies 2: Applied Macroeconomic Analysis (MSc GEG) - 15PECH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Economic development of South Asia A (MSc GEG) - 15PECH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Economic development of South Asia B (MSc GEG) - 15PECH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Applied Economics of the Asia-Pacific Region I (MSc GEG) - 15PECH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Applied Economics of the Asia-Pacific Region II (MSc GEG) - 15PECH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Growth and Development (MSc GEG) - 15PECH016 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year International Finance(MSc GEG) - 15PECH017 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Theory of Financial Institutions (MSc GEG) - 15PECH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The political economy of development in Africa - 15PECH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Development Studies Department Aid and development - 15PDSH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Agrarian Development, Food Policy and Rural Poverty - 15PDSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Borders and Development - 15PDSH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Civil society, social movements and the development process - 15PDSH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Development practice - 15PDSH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Environment, Governance and Development - 15PDSH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Extractive Industries, Energy, Biofuels and Development in a Time of Climate Change - 15PDSH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Famine and food security - 15PDSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Issues in forced migration - 15PDSH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global commodity chains, production networks and informal work - 15PDSH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global Health and Development - 15PDSH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Migration and Policy - 15PDSH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Natural resources, development and change: putting critical analysis into practice - 15PDSH031 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Problems of development in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PDSH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Security - 15PDSH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The working poor and development - 15PDSH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Understanding economic migration: Theories, Patterns and Policies - 15PDSH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Water and development:conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Department of Financial and Management Studies (DeFiMs) Corporate finance - 15PFMC070 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Corporate governance - 15PFMC069 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Cross-cultural management - 15PFMC076 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International Business Strategy - 15PFMC082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International human resource management - 15PFMC078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International management - 15PFMC072 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International Marketing - 15PFMC080 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Management in China 1 - domestic perspectives - 15PFMC067 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Management in China 2 - international perspectives - 15PFMC068 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Management in Japan I - 15PFMC018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Risk management - 15PFMC071 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Topics in the Chinese economy - 15PFMC075 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 School of Law Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Politics Conflict, rights and justice - 15PPOH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Geopolitics and Security in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International Politics of Human Rights - 15PPOH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Security governance - 15PPOH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 State and Society in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The Indian Ocean in World Politics - 15PPOH032 (0.5 - Term 2 Unit) The Law & Politics of State Violence: An Interdisciplinary Perspective - 15PPOH034 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year List of 0.33 unit options Choose THREE 0.33 unit modules (to make up a total of 1 unit) from the following list: Economics African Economic Development 1 (MSc RID) - 15PECC057 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 African Economic Development 2 (MSc RID) - 15PECC058 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Economic Development and Financial Systems (MSc RID) - 15PECC056 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 Economic Development in South Asia a) the macroeconomy (MSc RID) - 15PECC060 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Economic Development in South Asia b) Major sectors and the International Economy (MSc RID) - 15PECC061 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Economic issues of the Environment and Development (MSc RID) - 15PECC055 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Macroeconomic theories and techniques (MSc RID) - 15PECC062 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Microeconomic theory and techniques (MSc RID) - 15PECC054 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 Research Methods in International Development - 15PECC053 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 Statistical Research Techniques in International Development - 15PECC052 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Development Studies Department Aid and Development (MSc RID) - 15PDSH062 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 Borders and Development (MSc RID) - 15PDSH063 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Development Practice (MSc RID) - 15PDSH056 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Environment, Governnance and Development (MSc RID) - 15PDSH061 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Extractive Industries, Energy, Biofuels and Development in a Time of Climate Change (MSc RID) - 15PDSH047 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Famine and Food Security (MSc RID) - 15PDSH044 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender and Development (MSc RID) - 15PDSH037 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 Global Commodity Chains, Production Networks and Informal Work (MSc RID) - 15PDSH059 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 Global Health and Development (MSc RID) - 15PDSH052 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Issues in Forced Migration (MSc RID) - 15PDSH064 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 Marxist Political Economy and Global Development (MSc RID) - 15PDSH058 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Migration and Policy (MSc RID) - 15PDSH065 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 Natural resources, development and change: putting critical analysis into practice (MSc RID) - 15PDSH043 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Neoliberalism, Democracy and Global Development (MSc RID) - 15PDSH055 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Problems of Development in the Middle East and North Africa (MSc RID) - 15PDSH060 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Civil Society , Social Movements and the Development Process (MSc RID) - 15PDSH036 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Security (MSc RID) - 15PDSH035 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 The Working Poor and Development (MSc RID) - 15PDSH045 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Understanding Economic Migration Theories, Patterns and Policies (MSc RID) - 15PDSH042 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 War to Peace Transitions (MSc RID) - 15PDSH046 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Water Resources: Justice and Governance (MSc RID) - 15PDSH041 (0.33 Unit) - Term 1 Water Resources: Conflict and Governance (MSc RID) - 15PDSH040 (0.33 Unit) - Term 2 Materials SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Access to other London Universities will be provided, where relevant to specific courses. Teaching & Learning Courses are taught in lectures and tutorial groups. Degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. Courses are generally assessed on the basis of a final examination (70%) and an essay or project-based coursework (30%). MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years. Learning Outcomes Knowledge Students will learn about core policy debates on global economic governance. Students will study the current institutional and organisational architecture of global economic policy-making and governance. Students will have an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of differing economic theories and methods, and of how these relate to economic policy debates and designs in the area of global economic governance. Students will study regionally specific economic policy challenges in the context of the evolution of the global economy, and will have an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of different regional perspectives on global economic governance. Students will be trained in the understanding and use of economic policy tools and design, as well as issues of policy implementation and monitoring. Students taking the research pathway of the MSc GEGP will acquire sound knowledge of statistical research techniques and economic research methods. Intellectual (thinking) skills Students will learn to develop intellectual initiative and to analyse, evaluate and reflect critically on current research in the area of global economic governance. Students will acquire the ability to discriminate between competing economic theories and methods underlying the design of global economic policies, and to critically appraise the policy implications of these differing approaches. Students will learn to apply theoretical, empirical and technical knowledge about core features of current global economic governance to practical policy analysis through coursework and the dissertation. Students will have an opportunity to translate a complex understanding of issues in global economic governance into reform proposals, and to learn how to present these in an articulate, informed and coherent manner. Subject-based practical skills Students will learn how to gather, organise and employ data, information and evidence for economic policy analysis and design in the area of global economic governance. Students will gain the ability to critically assess economic policy tools and to design economic policy proposals in a case study context. Students will learn how to identify core problems in economic policy design, implementation and monitoring Students will acquire the ability to marshal arguments lucidly, coherently and concisely to present core analyses and policy messages or suggestions in clear language (written and verbal). Students taking the research pathway of the MSc GEGP will learn how to apply one or more research methods systematically to a chosen topic or project. Transferable skills Students will be able to analyse, evaluate and reflect critically on information received. Students will learn how to present ideas coherently and concisely, in writing and orally, extracting key elements from complex information. Students will be given the opportunity to engage with independent research on well defined tasks or topics. Students will learn how to identify policy problems and design solutions, selecting and applying competing theories and methods appropriately. Students will gain an understanding of how to gather, organise and deploy data and evidence to form a balanced judgement and to develop and support critical argument and policy recommendations. S Students will have an opportunity to present written and oral materials clearly and effectively and to engage constructively with feedback. Destinations The MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy is a new programme, starting in 2016/17. Students enrolling in this programme will return to or pursue careers in a wide range of positions in public, private and non-governmental project management and policy advice, for which a thorough understanding of on-going issues in global economic governance is essential. This includes, for example, government officials from developing and advanced countries whose remit requires a wider understanding of global economic governance issues; employees of international organisations whose remits are not primarily concerned with economic policy-making, but increasingly require a thorough understanding of global economic governance issue to co-ordinate their approaches with those of other national and international organizations; private sector managers and consultants requiring a systematic understanding of current economic crises and imbalances in the world economy as well as regulatory approaches to this; employees of NGOs working in areas affected by current global economic crises and imbalances and policy responses to these; graduate students wishing to build a career in any of the above, and economics graduates with a special interest in global economic policy debates and design. A Student's Perspective "One of the highlights of my course has been having the opportunity to study for one year at Thammasat University in Bangkok, Thailand. It was really daunting at first but there is no better way to learn a language than to totally immerse yourself in it and you learn all about the society and culture that you’re living in." Nicholas Day [-]

MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. It tackles policy and regulatory change, the historical and technological evolution of energy sources, energy markets and their participants, the global governance of climate change as well as the challenges associated with transitioning to a low-carbon economy. [+]

MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy Duration: One calendar year (full time). Two or three years (part time). Minimum Entry Requirements: A minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Candidates with a lower class degree but degree-relevant work experience may be considered. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. It tackles policy and regulatory change, the historical and technological evolution of energy sources, energy markets and their participants, the global governance of climate change as well as the challenges associated with transitioning to a low-carbon economy. The programme specifically addresses the requirements of those wishing to deepen their theoretical and practical understanding of how energy and climate policies are designed, shaped, advocated and implemented and by whom across a multitude of cases drawn from the Global North and South and across multiple levels of political organisation from global to local arenas. The MSc is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy. It prepares for a multitude of careers in public and private contexts, including in public administration and government departments, strategic policy and risk advisory, government relations and public affairs, policy advocacy, think tanks and academia. Guest speakers on the programme's modules have included Angus Miller (Energy Advisor, UK Foreign Office), Tom Burke (Founding Director, E3G and Environmental Policy Advisor, Rio Tinto), Jonathan Grant (Asst. Director Sustainability and Climate Change, PwC), Kash Burchett (European Energy Analyst, IHS Global Insight), Chris Dodwell (AEA Technology, former Head of International Climate Policy, UK Department of Energy and Climate Change) and Andrew Pendleton (Head of Campaigns, Friends of the Earth). The programme draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. In particular, students will be able to benefit from the expertise located at the Centre for Environment, Development and Policy (CEDEP), the Law School's Law, Environment and Development Centre (LEDC), the Centre on the Politics of Energy Security (CEPES), the Centre for Water and Development, and the SOAS Food Studies Centre. In addition to the three core modules of Global Energy and Climate Policy (1 unit), Applied Energy and Climate Studies (0.5 units) and Global Public Policy (0.5 units) students choose a fourth module to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests. Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Paris and Brussels. Programme objectives Excellent understanding of the nature and development of global energy and climate policy, drawing on a variety of contributing disciplines Excellent knowledge of regulatory challenges and their impact on public and private stakeholders in both the Global South and North Ability to critically contribute to contemporary policy debates about reforms of international energy and climate governance architectures and their interaction with national and sub-national policy and regulatory frameworks Development of practical skills including policy analysis and policy advocacy, risk analysis, strategic communication and media We welcome applications from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds. It is not necessary to have a degree in a discipline directly related to global energy and climate policy. Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field. Structure Students take taught modules to the value of 3 full units plus 10,000 word dissertation One unit and two half units from A (compulsory) One unit (or two half units) from B or C Dissertation (compulsory) on a topic related to the programme’s core themes A). Global Energy and Climate Policy modules Applied Energy and Climate Studies Global Energy and Climate Policy Global Public Policy B). Additional modules available from the Centre Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific International Politics of Transitional Justice International Relations 1; Foundations of World Politics International Relations 2; Contemporary world Politics International Law 1; Foundation International Economics International Security Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World – Economic and Legal Perspectives Sport and Diplomacy: "More than a Game" History and future of the United Nations Global Advocacy C). Electives An elective module can be chosen from a wide variety available at SOAS dependent upon permission being granted by the module convenor and the student’s prior academic qualifications. Suggested electives for Global Energy and Climate Policy students Full Unit modules (1.0) Climate Change Law and Policy Law and Natural Resources International Environmental Law Half Unit modules (0.5) Contesting Natural Resources, Rural Livelihoods and Globalisation Famine and Food Security Water Law: Justice and Governance Water and Development: conflict and governance Disclaimer We cannot guarantee that all elective modules offered during the pre-registration period will be available for each academic session. Important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules Teaching & Learning The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full time employment. Participants may choose a combination of courses to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists. The Centre endeavours to make as many of the courses for Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) accessible to part time students. The majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00 where possible however lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some courses (between evening and daytime slots) so that part time students will have access to as many courses as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each GECP course taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends. Teaching includes Theory and practice of global energy and climate change policy as intertwined global issues Practical toolkit including policy analysis and planning, risk analysis, strategic communication, policy advocacy and negotiation skills Interaction with policymakers and government officials, energy industry and NGO representatives, and other practitioners An elective from a wide range: International Relations, International Law, International Economics, International Security, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a course offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law) Further activities Also included in the degree programme: Week-long study trip to energy and climate change related organisations in Brussels and Paris Advanced media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff Participation in workshops attended by public and private sector stakeholders Opportunity to organize and run the Centre’s annual Energy and Climate Policy conference Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners (visit the CISD website to listen to the podcasts) A Student's Perspective "I applied for the masters in Global Energy and Climate Policy at SOAS because the course description was ideally suited to my academic interests and career ambitions. I would strongly recommend this course to anyone with an interest in contemporary energy and climate issues, and the associated dark arts of policy and politics. Press coverage of real life events often coincided with a particular lecture topic, which was testament to the relevance of the course content to today’s challenges and opportunities. All in all, this was an excellent course addressing timely and topical issues, taught by enthusiastic and very knowledgeable lecturers in a first class establishment." Tim Rippon [-]

MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (Online Learning)

Online Full time Part time 2 - 5  April 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy is the online version of the successful campus degree of the same name. It provides students with a detailed understanding of the transformative change in energy systems now under way around the world and equips them with the knowledge and skills needed to play a part in it. It treats energy and climate change policy as inextricably linked, taking an integrated approach to the study of the two fields. Case studies are drawn from around the world, accounting for different conditions in developed, newly-industrialised and developing country contexts. [+]

Mode of Attendance: Online Programme description The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy is the online version of the successful campus degree of the same name. It provides students with a detailed understanding of the transformative change in energy systems now under way around the world and equips them with the knowledge and skills needed to play a part in it. It treats energy and climate change policy as inextricably linked, taking an integrated approach to the study of the two fields. Case studies are drawn from around the world, accounting for different conditions in developed, newly-industrialised and developing country contexts. The ways in which energy is produced, managed and consumed in the 21st century in both the Global North and South are fundamentally changing. While oil, coal and gas have continued to dominate the global energy mix, new players have emerged challenging the status-quo. From large offshore wind parks in the UK to innovative, mobile phone-enabled off-grid solar PV solutions in Kenya; from a booming electric car market in China to high-voltage energy superhighways criss-crossing Germany; from energy storage projects in California to concentrated solar power plants in South Africa – the global energy transition means more renewably-produced energy, more distributed generation, technology leapfrogging, greater energy efficiency of both existing and new installations, and greater investment in new energy infrastructure. Much of this transformative change has been driven by the urgent need to decarbonize energy systems and the global economy more widely, in order to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions to a level consistent with a 2°C (1.5°C) stabilisation pathway. The consequences of increasing global average surface temperatures pose serious risks to ecosystems and physical infrastructure and challenge various actors to cope with extreme weather events, the destruction of habitats, water scarcity, migration, public health and conflict. The global task is therefore not only one of international diplomacy, but one that requires policymakers at all levels of political authority, corporations, businesses, NGOs and others to take the necessary steps to effectively mitigate and adapt to climate change. The MSc’s focus is on policy and policymaking in the energy and climate space as the key to enabling change and creating the requisite legal and regulatory environment within which the low-carbon energy system of the future can develop and grow. It introduces students to the key energy sources, their economic and technical bases and how they are regulated. It further analyses energy and climate governance at the international level, and discusses the geopolitics of energy. Who is this programme for? The MSc is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy and who wish to study in a flexible way. Email: cisd@soas.ac.uk Phone: +44 (0)20 7898 4050 For further information, please visit SOAS website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy-online/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy---online.html [-]

MSc Globalisation and Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme is designed for those who want to understand global processes and development, and for those who want to work on, or analyse, development related tasks and issues. It is also highly relevant to anyone working, or intending to work, in development advocacy, policy making, and global development policy analysis, in the NGO sector, government agencies, and international development organisations. [+]

MSc Globalisation and Development Duration: One calendar year (full-time) or two years (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class degree in a relevant field, though relevant work experience will also be taken into consideration. For admissions queries please contact the MSc Globalisation and Development admissions tutor, Dr Thomas Marois. Start of programme: September intake only Who is this programme for? This programme is designed for those who want to understand global processes and development, and for those who want to work on, or analyse, development related tasks and issues. It is also highly relevant to anyone working, or intending to work, in development advocacy, policy making, and global development policy analysis, in the NGO sector, government agencies, and international development organisations. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, but we also welcome students who have worked in the area of development, or in a related field. This exciting programme offers a critical examination of the contemporary process of globalisation and how it influences the developing world, both before and after the ongoing global crisis. The MSc Globalisation and Development blends, in equal measure, critical analysis of mainstream thinking, alternative theories and practices, and case studies of political, social and cultural aspects of globalisation and development. This degree draws its strength from the unrivalled expertise at SOAS in development problems and processes. The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in how globalisation influences the developing world, and how the poor majority responds to these challenges. Highlights include: Critical and historical approaches to globalisation and their relationship to neoliberalism, imperialism and US global hegemony. Contemporary globalising processes – capital flows, state-market relations, transnational corporations, global commodity chains, inequality and poverty on a global scale. Transformation of work in the age of globalisation – new types of work, informalisation and precarisation, labour migration, agrarian change and gender relations. Globalisation and imperialism – post-Cold War imperial and civil wars, global and regional challengers to US hegemony: China and Russia. Globalisation, democracy and culture – human rights, democratisation, cosmopolitanism, standardisation, homogenisation. Alternatives to neoliberal globalisation – global labour movement, transnational social movements and NGOs, environmental issues. Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see 'Structure' for details on core and optional modules. Structure There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Globalisation and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. Specialisation Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying optional modules to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals. Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure. Core Modules All students take Globalisation and Development. Then select either Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. The dissertation is compulsory. Globalisation and development - 15PDSC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year Political economy of development - 15PDSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory, policy and practice of development - 15PDSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Development Studies - 15PDSC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Non-Assessed Courses All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics. Optional Modules - Development Studies Students may choose optional modules (one full module or two half modules) from the list below. Please check to ensure that any module in which you have a special interest is running in the year that you wish to study. In addition, access to relevant modules in other departments may be negotiated subject to the agreement of both Convenors. Agrarian Development, Food Policy and Rural Poverty - 15PDSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Aid and development - 15PDSH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Borders and Development - 15PDSH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Civil society, social movements and the development process - 15PDSH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Natural resources, development and change: putting critical analysis into practice - 15PDSH031 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Development practice - 15PDSH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Environment, Governance and Development - 15PDSH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Extractive Industries, Energy, Biofuels and Development in a Time of Climate Change - 15PDSH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Famine and food security - 15PDSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Fundamentals of research methods for Development Studies - 15PDSH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global commodity chains, production networks and informal work - 15PDSH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global Health and Development - 15PDSH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Issues in forced migration - 15PDSH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Marxist Political Economy and Global Development - 15PDSH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Migration and Policy - 15PDSH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Neoliberalism, Democracy and Global Development - 15PDSH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Problems of development in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PDSH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Security - 15PDSH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The working poor and development - 15PDSH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Understanding economic migration: Theories, Patterns and Policies - 15PDSH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Water and development:conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Open Options in Other Departments Economics Department Economic development in Africa - 15PECC203 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region - 15PECC334 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic problems and policies in modern China - 15PECC035 (1 Unit) - Full Year The political economy of development in Africa - 15PECH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Politics and International Studies Department Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Politics of Globalisation and Development in Asia and Africa - 15PPOC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year School of Law Human Rights in The Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit) - Full Year Water Law: Justice and Governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropology and Sociology Department Therapy and Culture - 15PANH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 History Department Environmental History of Asia - 15PHIH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Study of Religions Religions and Development - 15PSRH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Materials SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Teaching & Learning Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Globalisation and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions. An MSc in Globalisation and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: African Centre for Biosafety Arab Image Foundation BP plc ClearlySo Commonwealth Partnership for Technology Management Commonwealth Secretariat Christian Aid Fairfood International Gareth Thomas MP, Shadow Minister for Civil Society Health Poverty Action Hitachi Europe Ltd Islamic Relief Ministry of National Education Ministry of Finance of Japan NSPCC Operation Smile Mission in Kenya The Risk Advisory Group United Nations Association Of Norway World Bank World Food Programme The CREES Foundation theIDLgroup World Food Programme Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Policy Network Manager Communications and External Affairs Challenger Investment & Research Analyst Network Facilitator International Development Researcher Communication Officer Deputy Country Director Corporate Social Responsibility Specialist Strategic Initiatives and Communications Associate HR Development and Education Assistant Development Coordinator Project Leader, Arts & Humanities Journalist-Researcher Head of Programme Funding Gender and Rural Growth Consultant Research Associate Monitoring and Evaluation Programme Officer A Student's Perspective "The SOAS Globalisation and Development program brought me a global political element to my past food security background." Josephine Tsui [-]

MSc in Agricultural Economics (Distance Learning)

Distance learning Full time Part time 2 - 5  February 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course provides students with the essential tools required for theoretical and empirical economic analysis, particularly in relation to the renewable natural resources sector. It aims to equip students with the rigorous technical skills that are generic to the field of agricultural economics, while maintaining a focus on applications rather than abstract analysis. [+]

This course provides students with the essential tools required for theoretical and empirical economic analysis, particularly in relation to the renewable natural resources sector. It aims to equip students with the rigorous technical skills that are generic to the field of agricultural economics, while maintaining a focus on applications rather than abstract analysis. Students are able to take modules orientated towards development, production, marketing, policy, and economic transition. The course is designed for those who wish to pursue a career as an agricultural economist or to undertake higher studies within this area. Programme start February and May annually Duration2 – 5 years. Students take an average of 3 years to complete the MSc programme. Time commitment The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June. For the 30-week study period, you will need to allocate 5-6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15-week session, 10-12 hours per module, per week, is recommended. Study materials Once registered, you will be sent a comprehensive study package for each of your chosen modules. This includes: A detailed study guide. Composed of ten units, this incorporates exercises, assignments and other activities into the study text, which will take you through your programme of self-directed study. Most module study guides are now provided in electronic format. An indicative study calendar. This will assist you in planning your study, as well as highlighting deadlines such as those for Tutor Marked Assignments. Books and other published materials. Generally textbooks, these are acquired on your behalf and should provide background as well as key extracts necessary for study of the module. Integrated volumes of key readings. These are drawn from a wide range of sources and are provided as required readings. Information is also supplied regarding sources of further reading as well as weblinks, for students to look into should they so wish. Supplementary study materials. These are included where appropriate, and include items such as computer software Library access Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE provides easy access to study resources, as well as to fast and efficient academic and administrative support. It also enables you to be part of a learning community in a way in which distance learners have seldom been accustomed in the past. Visit the SOAS website for more information. [-]

MSc in Environmental Economics (Distance Learning)

Online & Campus Combined Full time Part time 2 - 5 

This programme provides graduates with a sound theoretical base and practical appreciation of the concepts and methods of environmental and natural resource economics relevant to policy decisions and research. It is designed to suit students with a primary interest in issues and policies concerning the rural environment. [+]

Environmental issues at local, national and global levels are among the foremost challenges facing society today, and the result of complex interactions of natural processes with economic forces and policies. It is widely recognised that most environmental problems, whether small-scale or global, are the result of a complex interaction of natural processes with economic forces and decisions. This programme provides graduates with a sound theoretical base and practical appreciation of the concepts and methods of environmental and natural resource economics relevant to policy decisions and research. It is designed to suit students with a primary interest in issues and policies concerning the rural environment. Programme start February and May annually Duration2 – 5 years. Students take an average of 3 years to complete the MSc programme. February and May annually Time commitment The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June. For the 30-week study period, you will need to allocate 5-6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15-week session, 10-12 hours per module, per week, is recommended. Study materials Once registered, you will be sent a comprehensive study package for each of your chosen modules. This includes: A detailed study guide. Composed of ten units, this incorporates exercises, assignments and other activities into the study text, which will take you through your programme of self-directed study. Most module study guides are now provided in electronic format. An indicative study calendar. This will assist you in planning your study, as well as highlighting deadlines such as those for Tutor Marked Assignments. Books and other published materials. Generally textbooks, these are acquired on your behalf and should provide background as well as key extracts necessary for study of the module. Integrated volumes of key readings. These are drawn from a wide range of sources and are provided as required readings. Information is also supplied regarding sources of further reading as well as weblinks, for students to look into should they so wish. Supplementary study materials. These are included where appropriate, and include items such as computer software Library access Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE provides easy access to study resources, as well as to fast and efficient academic and administrative support. It also enables you to be part of a learning community in a way in which distance learners have seldom been accustomed in the past. Visit the SOAS website for more information [-]

MSc in Environmental Management (Distance Learning)

Distance learning Full time Part time 2 - 5  February 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to current issues of global environmental concern. It is relevant to those who are concerned with the management of resources and the making and implementation of policies that have an environmental impact at local, national and international levels. [+]

This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to current issues of global environmental concern. It is relevant to those who are concerned with the management of resources and the making and implementation of policies that have an environmental impact at local, national and international levels. Programme start February and May annually Duration2 – 5 years. Students take an average of 3 years to complete the MSc programme. February and May annually Time commitment The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June. For the 30-week study period, you will need to allocate 5-6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15-week session, 10-12 hours per module, per week, is recommended. Study materials Once registered, you will be sent a comprehensive study package for each of your chosen modules. This includes: A detailed study guide. Composed of ten units, this incorporates exercises, assignments and other activities into the study text, which will take you through your programme of self-directed study. Most module study guides are now provided in electronic format. An indicative study calendar. This will assist you in planning your study, as well as highlighting deadlines such as those for Tutor Marked Assignments. Books and other published materials. Generally textbooks, these are acquired on your behalf and should provide background as well as key extracts necessary for study of the module. Integrated volumes of key readings. These are drawn from a wide range of sources and are provided as required readings. Information is also supplied regarding sources of further reading as well as weblinks, for students to look into should they so wish. Supplementary study materials. These are included where appropriate, and include items such as computer software Library access Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE provides easy access to study resources, as well as to fast and efficient academic and administrative support. It also enables you to be part of a learning community in a way in which distance learners have seldom been accustomed in the past. Visit the SOAS website for more information. [-]

MSc in Finance

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3 

Students who take the MSc in Finance will develop a sound understanding of theories of finance and of the workings of financial markets, and will acquire the main analytical tools for a career in finance or further research at PhD level. They will become acquainted with the main issues and methods in Corporate Finance, Risk Management, Banking, and Financial Econometrics and will be able to employ them in a professional capacity. [+]

MSc in Finance Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two or Three calendar years (part-time Minimum Entry Requirements: A Bachelor’s degree in Finance, Economics or other appropriate discipline, from a UK university or other institution acceptable to the University, or an equivalent international qualification (qualifications in other subjects will be assessed on their merits). Candidates who do not have an undergraduate degree in Finance, Economics or a related discipline may take the GMAT or GRE test. GMAT code: CS-291217-F5P8-0000 Start of programme: September (a three-week preliminary course is September is a requirement) Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Students who take the MSc in Finance will develop a sound understanding of theories of finance and of the workings of financial markets, and will acquire the main analytical tools for a career in finance or further research at PhD level. They will become acquainted with the main issues and methods in Corporate Finance, Risk Management, Banking, and Financial Econometrics and will be able to employ them in a professional capacity. The programme will present Finance as a scientific discipline with a rigorous methodology, but at the same time will describe the way financial markets and institutions actually work in a variety of contexts. The comparative approach of the courses will prove attractive to students from both emerging and advanced economies. Structure The MSc in Finance has three components: Four core courses to the value of 2.0 units Elective course(s) to the value of 1.0 unit Dissertation of 10,000 words on an approved topic 1.0 unit The 10,000-word dissertation is worth 25% of your final mark. During term 2 you will submit your dissertation proposal and select an academic supervisor. Over the ensuing months you should meet with your supervisor at least three times before the end of term 3 for guidance. The bulk of your dissertation will be written over the summer to meet the mid-September deadline. Not all elective courses are offered every year; please check your preferences with the Programme Convenor. As the elective courses are half units (0.5), you should select one term 1 half unit course and one term 2 half unit course. Part-time Study Part-time students are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, then one core and two elective courses plus the dissertation during the second year. Those enrolled on the three-year programme are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, one core and two elective courses in the second year, and the dissertation in the third year. Pre-sessional Introductory Modules Mathematics and Statistics for Finance Pre-sessional Course - 15PFMC098 (0 Unit) - Full Year Core Modules Corporate finance - 15PFMC070 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Econometric Principles and Data Analysis - 15PFMC096 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Finance in the global market - 15PFMC057 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Risk management - 15PFMC071 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Elective Modules Advanced Quantitative Research Methods - 15PFMC083 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Bank Regulation and Resolution of Banking Crises - 15PFMC097 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Corporate governance - 15PFMC069 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Islamic banking and finance - 15PFMC074 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The Japanese financial system - 15PFMC073 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Dissertation Destinations Graduates from the MSc in Finance will be well equipped for a career in finance, banking, consultancy or business. A Student's Perspective "The friendly research atmosphere, extensive library resources and academic training courses will help to stimulate your inspiration, promote your talent, and push yourself to new academic heights. " Boying Xu [-]

MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice (Distance Learning)

Distance learning Full time Part time 2 - 5 

The programmes integrate theory and practice and provide an understanding of how to manage organisations within their own cultural, political, technological, social, and institutional contexts, with the ultimate aim of solving problems of poverty reduction. [+]

Mode of Attendance: Distance Learning Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. These programmes will give you the scientific, technological and economic knowledge and the skills to analyse and tackle the poverty suffered by these people. You will be able to work on real issues, using the specialist expertise gained from your course. The programmes integrate theory and practice and provide an understanding of how to manage organisations within their own cultural, political, technological, social, and institutional contexts, with the ultimate aim of solving problems of poverty reduction. Programme start February and May annually Duration2 – 5 years. Students take an average of 3 years to complete the MSc programme. Time commitment The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June. For the 30-week study period, you will need to allocate 5-6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15-week session, 10-12 hours per module, per week, is recommended. Study materials Once registered, you will be sent a comprehensive study package for each of your chosen modules. This includes: A detailed study guide. Composed of ten units, this incorporates exercises, assignments and other activities into the study text, which will take you through your programme of self-directed study. Most module study guides are now provided in electronic format. An indicative study calendar. This will assist you in planning your study, as well as highlighting deadlines such as those for Tutor Marked Assignments. Books and other published materials. Generally textbooks, these are acquired on your behalf and should provide background as well as key extracts necessary for study of the module. Integrated volumes of key readings. These are drawn from a wide range of sources and are provided as required readings. Information is also supplied regarding sources of further reading as well as weblinks, for students to look into should they so wish. Supplementary study materials. These are included where appropriate, and include items such as computer software Library access Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE provides easy access to study resources, as well as to fast and efficient academic and administrative support. It also enables you to be part of a learning community in a way in which distance learners have seldom been accustomed in the past. Visit the SOAS website for more information. [-]

MSc in Public Policy & Management (Distance Learning)

Online Full time Part time

Successful managers, politicians and professionals running public organisations need to have a range of skills and knowledge and a critical awareness of the challenges facing them. These programmes offer both technical education and critical and comparative material about how the public sector and public sector finance is managed across the world. [+]

Start of programme: November / February / April / June / August Mode of Attendance: Distance Learning Successful managers, politicians and professionals running public organisations need to have a range of skills and knowledge and a critical awareness of the challenges facing them. These programmes offer both technical education and critical and comparative material about how the public sector and public sector finance is managed across the world. Find out more To find out more about this programme, including module details, fees and entry requirements, please visit the MSc Public Policy and Management section of the Centre for Financial and Management Studies website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/cefims/programmes/mscppm/ [-]

MSc International Business Administration (Distance Learning)

Online Full time Part time

International businesses have a growing need for senior personnel with high quality management skills and specialist regional knowledge. As the regions of Asia and of Africa take roles as leading and emerging economies in the world, this MSc International Business Administration responds to this need. Students will study the interplay between global and local factors that influence management decisions in business. [+]

Start of programme: November / February / April / June / August Mode of Attendance: Distance Learning International businesses have a growing need for senior personnel with high quality management skills and specialist regional knowledge. As the regions of Asia and of Africa take roles as leading and emerging economies in the world, this MSc International Business Administration responds to this need. Students will study the interplay between global and local factors that influence management decisions in business. Find out more To find out more about this programme, including module details, fees and entry requirements, please visit the MSc International Business Administration section of the Centre for Financial and Management Studies website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/cefims/programmes/msc-international-business-administration/ [-]

MSc International Management (China)

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme focuses on management and its environment in China and includes high-level courses in international management and finance disciplines. It draws upon China experts and management specialists within the University and from positions within commerce, finance and government. [+]

MSc International Management (China) Duration: One calendar year full-time; two calendar years part-time Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum first degree with good grades in any subject equivalent to a UK upper second class honours. Relevant professional qualifications or experience will be considered. Start of programme: September intake only This programme focuses on management and its environment in China and includes high-level courses in international management and finance disciplines. It draws upon China experts and management specialists within the University and from positions within commerce, finance and government. The core modules enable you to study the principles and applications of international management and the interplay between global and local factors influencing management in China. You can use the elective modules to focus on either management skills that can be applied worldwide or specialise in understanding the Chinese business environment. The programme combines the study of China with close attention to the business worlds of Hong Kong and Taiwan. For those who choose to, this programme also offers the opportunity to learn Chinese - either at an introductory level or at an advanced level for business purposes. No knowledge of Chinese is required to complete the MSc programme successfully, since English language materials are used. Structure The MSc International Management for China has three components: Four core courses Elective course(s) to the value of 1.0 unit Dissertation of 10,000 words on an approved topic Elective courses are divided into Chinese Managerial Environment and General Management electives. Students are encouraged to combine courses from both in order to build an understanding of the local business and cultural environment. The 10,000-word dissertation is worth 25% of your final mark. During term 2 you will submit your dissertation proposal and select an academic supervisor. Over the ensuing months you should meet with your supervisor at least three times before the end of term 3 for guidance. The bulk of your dissertation will be written over the summer to meet the mid-September deadline. Not all elective courses are offered every year; please check your preferences with the Programme Convenor. Also note that if half units are selected, one term 1 course and one term 2 course needs to be chosen across Regional and General electives. Part-time Study Part-time students are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, then one core and two elective courses plus the dissertation during the second year. Those enrolled on the three-year programme are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, one core and two elective courses in the second year, and the dissertation in the third year. Core Modules International management - 15PFMC072 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Management in China 1 - domestic perspectives - 15PFMC067 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Management in China 2 - international perspectives - 15PFMC068 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Research methods in management - 15PFMC062 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Elective Modules Topics in the Chinese economy - 15PFMC075 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Corporate finance - 15PFMC070 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Corporate governance - 15PFMC069 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Cross-cultural management - 15PFMC076 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International Business Strategy - 15PFMC082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International human resource management - 15PFMC078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International Marketing - 15PFMC080 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Risk management - 15PFMC071 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 ( Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Special Course in Chinese 1 (PG) - 15PCHC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 2 (PG) - 15PCHC011 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 3 (PG) - 15PCHC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 4 (PG) - 15PCHC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Advanced Chinese for Business - 15PCHH027 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation Destinations MSc International Management (China) graduates leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analysing and selecting information; communicating effectively; understanding and interpreting numerical data - numeracy and problem solving. An MSc International Management (China) postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates are equipped with advanced training and research expertise related to finance, management and development enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in both business and public sectors. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Air France Asia Biogas Group Bloomberg Bonhams Chanel Citi CRCC Asia Ltd German American Chamber of Commerce, Inc. Government of Canada IPM International Consultants SRL KPMG LLP UK Ministry of Finance of the Republic of Estonia Ping An Group of China Queensland University of Technology Saatchi and Saatchi Toshiba International (Europe) Ltd UKTI Australia & New Zealand Zhejiang Grand Import & Export Co., Ltd Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Management Accountant Director - China Operations FX & Commodity Analyst Assistant Vice President, APAC Global Account Manager Manager, Consulting Services Policy Analyst Director of Business Process,Taiwan and Vietnam Research Executive Advisor Communication & Event Manager for Switzerland Lecturer Finance Manager PR Manager Buyer Director of Trade Australasia Business Development Manager China A Student's Perspective "Part of the reason I chose SOAS over others is because it offered the Islamic Banking and Finance elective module. This is a one-of-a-kind class and an interesting subject that only SOAS offers. My hope is that the knowledge attained in this class will make me more suited for international corporate jobs that deal with the states that are a part of the Gulf Cooperation Council." Tariq Islam [-]

MSc International Management (Japan)

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme focuses on management and its environment in Japan and includes high-level courses in international management and finance disciplines. It draws upon Japan experts and management specialists within the University and from positions within London-based commerce, finance and government. [+]

MSc International Management (Japan) Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two calendar years (part-time) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum first degree with good grades in any subject equivalent to a UK upper second class honours Start of programme: September intake only This programme focuses on management and its environment in Japan and includes high-level courses in international management and finance disciplines. It draws upon Japan experts and management specialists within the University and from positions within London-based commerce, finance and government. The core modules enable you to study the principles and applications of international management and the interplay between global and local factors influencing management in Japan. You can use the elective modules to focus on either management skills that can be applied worldwide or specialise in understanding the Japanese business environment. For those who choose to, our programme also offers unique opportunities to improve existing skills in Japanese. No knowledge of Japanese is required to complete the MSc programme successfully, since English language materials are available. Those students who already have Japanese language skills will have every opportunity to use them in studying data and source materials. Structure The MSc International Management for Japan has three components: Four core courses Elective course(s) to the value of 1.0 unit Dissertation of 10,000 words on an approved topic Electives are divided into the Japanese Managerial Environment and General Management courses. Students are encouraged to take a mixture of both in order to build an understanding of the local business and cultural environment. The 10,000-word dissertation is worth 25% of your final mark. During term 2 you will submit your dissertation proposal and select an academic supervisor. Over the ensuing months you should meet with your supervisor at least three times before the end of term 3 for guidance. The bulk of your dissertation will be written over the summer to meet the mid-September deadline. Not all elective courses are offered every year; please check your preferences with the Programme Convenor. Also note that if half units are selected, one term 1 course and one term 2 course needs to be chosen across Regional and General electives. Part-time Study Part-time students are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, then one core and two elective courses plus the dissertation during the second year. Those enrolled on the three-year programme are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, one core and two elective courses in the second year, and the dissertation in the third year. Core Modules International management - 15PFMC072 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Management in Japan I - 15PFMC018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Management in Japan II - 15PFMC077 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Research methods in management - 15PFMC062 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Elective Modules Corporate finance - 15PFMC070 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Corporate governance - 15PFMC069 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Cross-cultural management - 15PFMC076 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International Business Strategy - 15PFMC082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International Marketing - 15PFMC080 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International human resource management - 15PFMC078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Risk management - 15PFMC071 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The Japanese financial system - 15PFMC073 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Advanced Japanese for business and management - 15PFMC064 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Basic Japanese 1 (PG) - 15PJKC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Basic Japanese 2 (PG) - 15PJKC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intermediate Japanese 1 (PG) - 15PJKC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intermediate Japanese 2 (PG) - 15PJKC011 (1 Unit) - Full Year Advanced Japanese: Contemporary Topics (PG) - 15PJKC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Advanced Practical Japanese (Masters) - 15PEAC021 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Dissertation A Student's Perspective "The cultural diversity of the student body makes for a multi-dimensional learning experience" Tomoko Sugimoto [-]

MSc International Management (Middle East and North Africa)

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme focuses on management and its environment in the Middle East and North Africa, and includes high-level courses in international management and finance disciplines. It also draws upon regional experts and management specialists within the University and from positions within based commerce, finance and government. [+]

MSc International Management (Middle East and North Africa) Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two calendar years (part-time) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum first degree with good grades in any subject equivalent to a UK upper second class honours. Relevant professional qualifications or experience will be considered. Start of programme: September intake only This programme focuses on management and its environment in the Middle East and North Africa, and includes high-level courses in international management and finance disciplines. It also draws upon regional experts and management specialists within the University and from positions within based commerce, finance and government. The core modules enable you to study the principles and applications of international management and the interplay between global and local factors influencing management in the Middle East and North Africa. You can use the elective modules to focus on either management skills that can be applied worldwide or specialise in understanding the regional business environment. Structure The MSc International Management for Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has three components: Four compulsory courses Elective course(s) to the value of 1.0 unit Dissertation of 10,000 words on an approved topic The 10,000-word dissertation is worth 25% of your final mark. During term 2 you will submit your dissertation proposal and select an academic supervisor. Over the ensuing months you should meet with your supervisor at least three times before the end of term 3 for guidance. The bulk of your dissertation will be written over the summer to meet the mid-September deadline. Not all elective courses are offered every year; please check your preferences with the Programme Convenor. Also note that if half units are selected, one term 1 course and one term 2 course needs to be chosen. Part-time Study Part-time students are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, then one core and two elective courses plus the dissertation during the second year. Those enrolled on the three-year programme are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, one core and two elective courses in the second year, and the dissertation in the third year. Core Modules International management - 15PFMC072 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Economic, business and institutional environment of the Middle East and North Africa - 15PFMC066 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Management perspectives and sectoral issues in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PFMC065 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Research methods in management - 15PFMC062 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Elective Modules Islamic banking and finance - 15PFMC074 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Corporate finance - 15PFMC070 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Corporate governance - 15PFMC069 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Cross-cultural management - 15PFMC076 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International Business Strategy - 15PFMC082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International human resource management - 15PFMC078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International Marketing - 15PFMC080 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Risk management - 15PFMC071 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Dissertation A Student's Perspective "It is only at SOAS is where you would find your Jamaican friends enjoying listening to classic Arabic music at the student’s union, the Japanese classmates enthusiastically taking part at the African societies’ activities, and prayer rooms where students from different faiths would gather in one place in full peace." Erum Abdullah Al-Howaish [-]

MSc International Politics

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MSc in International Politics might be classified as a disciplinary MSc. In it, the objective is to give the student the opportunity to undertake a rigorous training in political theory, with special reference to the study of politics outside Europe and America. [+]

MSc International Politics Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: The qualification for entry is normally a first or upper-second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Politics or International Relations, or a related social science discipline. Applicants without such a background may be considered for admission depending on their academic training and undergraduate performance. Start of programme: September intake only The Department of Politics and International Studies offers seven linked masters programmes in politics and the international politics of Asia and Africa. The MSc in International Politics might be classified as a disciplinary MSc. In it, the objective is to give the student the opportunity to undertake a rigorous training in political theory, with special reference to the study of politics outside Europe and America. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write substantial papers that often require significant independent work. Structure Students take taught modules to the value of 3 full units + dissertation. Modules taken must be equivalent to 3 half units per term [ie 3 courses in term 1 and 3 courses in term 2] ONE half-unit from A (compulsory) FIVE half units or equivalent from B, C and/ or D Dissertation (compulsory) on some aspect of International Politics *All modules offered by the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy are subject to convenors’ approval. A. Compulsory Course: International theory - 15PPOH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 B. Up to TWO of the following TERM 1 half modules: International Relations 1: Foundations of World Politics - 15PFFH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global Advocacy - 15PFFH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Conflict, rights and justice - 15PPOH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Political Thought on the Just Rebellion - 15PPOH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Political society in the Middle East - 15PPOH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Approaches to Comparative Political Thought - 15PPOH028 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Violence, justice and the politics of memory - 15PPOH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japan Unravelled - 15PPOH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 C. Up to THREE of the following TERM 2 half modules: International Relations 2: Contemporary World Politics - 15PFFH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International Politics of Transitional Justice - 15PFFH010 (0.5 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Asian Security - 15PPOH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running Queer Politics in Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PGNH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Security governance - 15PPOH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Comparative International Political Thought - 15PPOH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International Politics of Human Rights - 15PPOH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 The Indian Ocean in World Politics - 15PPOH032 (0.5 - Term 2 Unit) The Law & Politics of State Violence: An Interdisciplinary Perspective - 15PPOH034 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Foreign Policy Analysis - 15PPOH013 (0.5 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research - 15PPOH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 State and transformation in the Middle East - 15PPOH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Geopolitics and Security in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International migration and diaspora politics - 15PPOH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 State and Society in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 D. Up to TWO of the following FULL YEAR modules: Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Government and politics of modern South East Asia - 15PPOC247 (1 Unit) - Full Year Politics of Globalisation and Development in Asia and Africa - 15PPOC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year State & society in Asia & Africa - 15PPOC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year State and society in the Chinese political process - 15PPOC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year Northeast Asian politics: Japan, Korea and Taiwan - 15PPOC253 (1 Unit) - Full Year Islamic/Democratic Political Thought - 15PPOC255 (1 Unit) - Full Year International politics of Africa - 15PPOC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 China and international politics - 15PPOC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year International Politics Of The Middle East - (Full unit Unit) International politics of East Asia - 15PPOC251 (1 Unit) - Full Year International Economics - 15PFFC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Global Energy & Climate Policy - 15PFFC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year E. Dissertation: This would be focused on some aspect of International Politics raised by the compulsory course 15PPOH014. Dissertation in Political Studies - 15PPOC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Learning Resources SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations SOAS MSc International Politics students leave SOAS not only with a knowledge and understanding of the complex political and cultural issues of international politics, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers, both in business and in the public sector. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Bates Wells & Braithwaite London LLP Consulate-General of Japan in New York Danish Institute for International Studies Finnish Broadcasting Company Konrad Adenauer Stiftung Media Programme Africa NATO Redd Barna (Save the Children Norway) Reuters Saïd Foundation The Next Century Foundation The Risk Advisory Group The World Bank United Nations Development Programme United States Government World Economic Forum Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Paralegal Research Advisor Middle East and North Africa Analyst Associate Editor Academic Relations Specialist Journalist Program Assistant, MENA Political Risk Analyst Oil and Gas Consultant Regional Consultant Social Media Manager and Contributor Project Director Operations Analyst Lecturer Project Manager A Student's Perspective "I realised that one of the most pressing contemporary issues in need of qualified social scientists is climate change. I wanted a program that skilled me with the multidisciplinary understanding necessary to deal with the complexity of this challenge. " Stina Maria Lindholm [-]

MSc Labour, Social Movements and Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. [+]

MSc Labour, Social Movements and Development Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Relevant work experience may also be considered. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields. A unique Programme This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations. The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour. Highlights include: Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work Feminisation of labour The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones Household and reproductive labour The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns. The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes. The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development. Structure There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. Specialisation Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals. Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure. Core Modules All students take Labour, Social Movements and Development. Then select either Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. The dissertation is compulsory. Labour,Social Movements and Development - 15PDSC007 (1 Unit) - Full Year Political economy of development - 15PDSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory, policy and practice of development - 15PDSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year Non-Assessed Courses All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics. Optional Modules - Development Studies Students may choose optional modules (one full module or two half modules) from the list below. Please check to ensure that any module in which you have a special interest is running in the year that you wish to study. In addition, access to relevant modules in other departments may be negotiated subject to the agreement of both Convenors. Agrarian Development, Food Policy and Rural Poverty - 15PDSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Aid and development - 15PDSH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Borders and Development - 15PDSH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Civil society, social movements and the development process - 15PDSH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Natural resources, development and change: putting critical analysis into practice - 15PDSH031 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Development practice - 15PDSH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Environment, Governance and Development - 15PDSH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Extractive Industries, Energy, Biofuels and Development in a Time of Climate Change - 15PDSH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Famine and food security - 15PDSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Fundamentals of research methods for Development Studies - 15PDSH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global commodity chains, production networks and informal work - 15PDSH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global Health and Development - 15PDSH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Issues in forced migration - 15PDSH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Marxist Political Economy and Global Development - 15PDSH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Migration and Policy - 15PDSH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Neoliberalism, Democracy and Global Development - 15PDSH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Problems of development in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PDSH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Security - 15PDSH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The working poor and development - 15PDSH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Understanding economic migration: Theories, Patterns and Policies - 15PDSH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Water and development:conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Open Options in Other Departments Economics Department Economic development in Africa - 15PECC203 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region - 15PECC334 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic problems and policies in modern China - 15PECC035 (1 Unit) - Full Year The political economy of development in Africa - 15PECH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Politics and International Studies Department Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Politics of Globalisation and Development in Asia and Africa - 15PPOC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year School of Law Water Law: Justice and Governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Study of Religions Religions and Development - 15PSRH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Materials SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Teaching & Learning Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions. An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. A Student's Perspective "Do not be surprised if you discover that you are drinking coffee with a former Malaysian political prisoner, or sitting in a lecture next to a journalist who reported from Tahrir Square during the Arab Spring. Both have happened to me. Every single person at SOAS has an interesting story to tell, and adds something unique and valuable to our community. So will you." Joe Buckley [-]

MSc Middle East Politics

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 United Kingdom London

The degree offers students an opportunity to study politics in the region through a number of disciplinary approaches, such as political sociology (class, gender, ethnicity and sect), comparative politics (state power, political economy of development, democratic openings and nationalism), and international politics (war, international political economy, regionalism and dependency). At the same time, it provides thematic courses that encourage students to look at political processes in the region from distinct perspectives, such as the study of political violence, the examination of the politics of resistance and the understanding of Islamic political ideologies and political movements. [+]

Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Politics and international relations in the Middle East display many of the characteristic features of the modern world. Contentious legacies of imperial map-making fuel frontier disputes and throw into question the legitimacy of the territorial nation state. Governments have been repeatedly challenged by populations tired of the old rationales for authoritarian rule and angered by its repressive effects. The politics of national identity, sometimes bound up with ideas of religious identity, have been given new urgency by class conflict, by military occupation and by the growth of the security state. Meanwhile, the long history of external intervention in the states of the region has heightened domestic and regional tensions. The degree offers students an opportunity to study politics in the region through a number of disciplinary approaches, such as political sociology (class, gender, ethnicity and sect), comparative politics (state power, political economy of development, democratic openings and nationalism), and international politics (war, international political economy, regionalism and dependency). At the same time, it provides thematic courses that encourage students to look at political processes in the region from distinct perspectives, such as the study of political violence, the examination of the politics of resistance and the understanding of Islamic political ideologies and political movements. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students are expected to read extensively, to make a number of presentations and to engage actively in seminar discussions. They are also expected to write substantial papers, guided by their course tutors, but requiring significant independent work. For details of entry requirements, duration, course structure, and fees, please visit SOAS website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscmepol/ [-]

MSc Migration Mobility and Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This innovative new programme in the Department of Development Studies offers students the opportunity to combine study and analysis of critical perspectives on development and the increasingly important and related field of migration studies. [+]

MSc Migration Mobility and Development Duration: One calendar year (full time). Two or three years (part time, daytime only). We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Relevant work experience may also be considered. Start of programme: September intake only Who is this programme for? The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of migration and / or development, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science. This innovative new programme in the Department of Development Studies offers students the opportunity to combine study and analysis of critical perspectives on development and the increasingly important and related field of migration studies. The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will focus attention on the political economy of migration from a historical perspective, major trends in migration theories, and different forms of and approaches to the study of migration and displacement. The programme draws on the expertise of staff in development, migration and forced migration contexts from the Development Studies department, and encourages inter-disciplinary dialogue with other relevant departments and centres within SOAS. The programme’s 20-week core modules will focus on the migration–development nexus, broadly conceived and defined. It will also expose students to a range of interlocking theoretical approaches which set out to account for constructions of and responses to migration and migrants, as well as to the scope and scale of migratory processes. Broadly, Term 1 provides analysis of the institutional, political, social and economic contexts where migration takes place and considers differentiated/mitigated effects. Term 2 builds on this to discuss types of migration via case study and other material, placing more emphasis on migrants’ perspectives and how these are mitigated by ‘contexts’. Topics and themes include: Sedentarism and the study of migration Polities & economies of migration Colonialism Nations, states and territory Globalisation (Illegal) workers in the global economy Place and emplacement Assimilation/acculturation/discrimination Transnational migrants & mobile lives Trafficking Development and migration Diasporas and development Refugees and internally displaced persons Development-induced displacement Environment and refugees/displacement Climate change-related migration Policy responses to migration Transformations North and South The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will provide a thorough analytical grounding in international migration including different types of forced and voluntary migration, facilitating the development of specialized knowledge of particular case studies, as well as overall trends and theoretical frameworks. A rigorous academic programme, it will also give students the confidence to think in policy relevant terms and will be equally valuable to those proceeding to professional employment in the sector with international organizations, NGOs and government bodies, and for students intending to go on to carry out PhD research. Structure There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Migration, Mobility and Development. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students work together in small groups to produce a migration related research report. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. Specialisation Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals. Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure. Core Courses All students take Migration, Mobility and Development. Then select either Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. The dissertation is compulsory. Migration and development - 15PDSC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year Political economy of development - 15PDSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory, policy and practice of development - 15PDSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Development Studies - 15PDSC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Non-Assessed Courses All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics. Optional Modules - Development Studies Students may choose optional modules (one full module or two half modules) from the list below. Please check to ensure that any module in which you have a special interest is running in the year that you wish to study. In addition, access to relevant modules in other departments may be negotiated subject to the agreement of both Convenors. Agrarian Development, Food Policy and Rural Poverty - 15PDSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Aid and development - 15PDSH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Borders and Development - 15PDSH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Civil society, social movements and the development process - 15PDSH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Natural resources, development and change: putting critical analysis into practice - 15PDSH031 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Development practice - 15PDSH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Environment, Governance and Development - 15PDSH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Extractive Industries, Energy, Biofuels and Development in a Time of Climate Change - 15PDSH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Famine and food security - 15PDSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Fundamentals of research methods for Development Studies - 15PDSH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global commodity chains, production networks and informal work - 15PDSH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global Health and Development - 15PDSH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Issues in forced migration - 15PDSH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Marxist Political Economy and Global Development - 15PDSH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Migration and Policy - 15PDSH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Neoliberalism, Democracy and Global Development - 15PDSH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Problems of development in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PDSH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Security - 15PDSH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The working poor and development - 15PDSH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Understanding economic migration: Theories, Patterns and Policies - 15PDSH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Water and development:conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Open Options in Other Departments Economics Department Economic development in Africa - 15PECC203 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region - 15PECC334 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic problems and policies in modern China - 15PECC035 (1 Unit) - Full Year The political economy of development in Africa - 15PECH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Politics and International Studies Department Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year School of Law Human Rights in The Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit) - Full Year Water Law: Justice and Governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropology and Sociology Department African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Therapy and Culture - 15PANH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Centre for Gender Studies Gendering migration & diasporas - 15PGNH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 History Department Environmental History of Asia - 15PHIH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Study of Religions Religions and Development - 15PSRH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Materials SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Teaching & Learning The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars, collaborative research projects and supervised individual study projects. Lectures Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Dissertation work requires students to make use of theoretical and empirical material and relate this to a migration related topic. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Migration, Mobility and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions. An MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. A Student's Perspective "SOAS seems to attract students who are both intellectually engaged with the world around them, and committed to making an impact in that world. I wanted to be a part of that magic. For example my cohort group of MPhil/PhD students represent some of the most humble and committed practitioners, activists, and intellectuals I’ve come across in one setting." Robtel Neajai Pailey [-]

MSc Political Economy of Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MSc in the Political Economy of Development is the latest addition to a portfolio of Masters programmes offered by the Department of Economics, and is designed for economists who want to concentrate on applied theory and to expand their regional expertise. [+]

MSc Political Economy of Development Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two or Three years (part-time, daytime only). We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Good undergraduate degree in, or including, Economics Start of programme: September intake only The MSc in the Political Economy of Development is the latest addition to a portfolio of Masters programmes offered by the Department of Economics, and is designed for economists who want to concentrate on applied theory and to expand their regional expertise. The MSc is a taught masters degree consisting of eight course modules taught by lectures, classes and tutorials and an 8,000 word dissertation. There are four core units and four optional modules that make up the course. The precise modules available vary from year to year, but include units on Agriculture, Finance, the Environment, Industry and International Macro- and Microeconomics. Eight in-depth regional economic development modules are also available, covering: Africa The Asia-Pacific region The Middle East South Asia All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. Structure Students registered for this MSc must take all the core courses listed below. The only possible exception is that students who have already an adequate maths and stats background may drop the Statistical Research Techniques module and take instead Quantitative Methods I and Quantitative Methods II (both have to be taken), but this requires the written permission of the course convenors for Quantitative Methods I and Quantitative Methods II. Students on this MSc must always take the Research Methods module and the other core modules. Core Courses Growth & development - 15PECC007 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Political economy of institutions - 15PECC020 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Statistical Research Techniques - 15PECC039 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 - (this module is only available to students taking this degree) Research Methods - 15PECC040 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 - (this module is only available to students taking this degree) Dissertation for MSc Economics programmes - 15PECC998 (0.8 Unit) - Full Year In additionn students may choose four from the following: - four optional modules from those on offer in the other Department of Economics MSc courses. African economies 1: applied microeconomic analysis - 15PECC024 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 African economies 2: applied macroeconomic analysis - 15PECC025 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Applied economics of the Middle East 1 - 15PECC028 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Applied economics of the Middle East 2 - 15PECC029 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Economic development of South Asia a) the macroeconomy - 15PECC026 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Economic development of South Asia b) major sectors & the internationa - 15PECC027 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Economic development of the Asia Pacific region 1 - 15PECC030 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Economic development of the Asia Pacific region 2 - 15PECC031 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Capital markets, derivatives & corporate finance - 15PECC011 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Economics of environment and development - 15PECC048 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Financial systems and economic development - 15PECC036 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 History of Economic Analysis - 15PECH006 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 International Trade and Investment - 15PECC018 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 International Finance - 15PECC019 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Macroeconomics - 15PECC005 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Marxist political economy and world development - 15PECC047 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Microeconomics - 15PECC006 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Political Economy of Agriculture and Food - 15PECC049 (0.4 Unit) - Term 1 Theory of financial institutions & policy - 15PECC021 (0.4 Unit) - Term 2 Teaching & Learning The MSc includes eight taught modules plus a preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics and an 8,000-word dissertation. The courses are taught in seminar groups and lectures. The degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. The MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years. Four modules are studied each year, with the dissertation normally being completed in the second year. Lectures Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation Students are required to complete an 8,000-word dissertation in applied economics. Learning Resources SOAS Library SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Pre Entry Reading Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative courses are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative courses focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs. Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary course in mathematics, statistics and computing. The objective of the course is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This course is compulsory. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Political Economy of Development from SOAS equips students with a range of important skills to continue in the field of research as well as a portfolio of widely transferable employability skills valued by a wide range of employers. These include numeracy, analytical thinking and general skills such as organisation and effective communication skills. Graduates will develop their regional expertise as well as an advanced understanding of issues of development in their political and economic context. In addition the study of Economics gives students particular problem solving skills including: abstraction, analysis, quantification, strategic thinking and adaptability. Postgraduate students from the SOAS MSc in Political Economy of Development have followed successful careers in both academic work and also in international banking and financial analysis, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-government organisations. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. A Student's Perspective "While being lectured in class by world experts in the field of development, SOAS events have also allowed me to hear and meet some of the originators of many of the ideas taught in class! Being at SOAS almost feels like being seated at the forefront of policy debate and this is what I enjoy the most." Anita Nwachukwu [-]

MSc Politics Of China

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MSc covers China’s domestic and international politics, and the historical and theoretical issues through the Chinese Politics courses of State and Society in the Chinese Political process (domestic politics), China and International Politics (international relations) and Taiwan’s Politics and Cross-Strait Relations. Each China Politics course combines empirical and theoretical material in a historically sensitive manner. [+]

MSc Politics Of China Duration: 1 year full-time or 2-3 years part-time. Minimum Entry Requirements: The qualification for entry is normally a first or upper-second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Politics or International Relations, or a related social science discipline. Applicants without such a background may be considered for admission depending on their academic training and undergraduate performance. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time China has the world’s biggest population and the second largest economy in the world. As part of the BRICS and BASIC group, China has a large impact in world affairs: understanding China is increasingly becoming essential to understanding the world. Politics and International Relations of China provide a fascinating opportunity to examine issues and themes in modern politics. From dynastic rule to the fall of the Qing, unequal treaties and their legacies in the form of Hong Kong and Macau, China offers an example for examining and analyzing long standing questions of territory, border, identity and sovereignty. From these historical origins to the more recent ‘Rise of China’, the buzzword of the 21st Century, this MSc degree brings together elements required to fully appreciate and understand China’s rise, its origins, and its current position in the world. The MSc covers China’s domestic and international politics, and the historical and theoretical issues through the Chinese Politics courses of State and Society in the Chinese Political process (domestic politics), China and International Politics (international relations) and Taiwan’s Politics and Cross-Strait Relations. Each China Politics course combines empirical and theoretical material in a historically sensitive manner. The courses aim to establish thematic groupings for the purposes of considering and debating the government and politics of China, and further examine the relations between the government and politics of China and regional developments, international pressures, and the global political economy. Structure 2 or 3 China units are required for the MSc China degree (in addition to the Chinese Politics dissertation). Students take taught courses to the value of 3 full units + dissertation: At least TWO units from A (compulsory); ONE additional unit from A, B, or C; Dissertation on some aspect of Chinese Politics (compulsory) A. At least TWO of the following Chinese Politics courses: China and international politics - 15PPOC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year State and society in the Chinese political process - 15PPOC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year B. ONE of the following Politics courses: International politics of East Asia - 15PPOC251 (1 Unit) - Full Year Politics of Globalisation and Development in Asia and Africa - 15PPOC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year State & society in Asia & Africa - 15PPOC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Northeast Asian politics: Japan, Korea and Taiwan - 15PPOC253 (1 Unit) - Full Year State and Society in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Geopolitics and Security in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Government and politics of modern South East Asia - 15PPOC247 (1 Unit) - Full Year The Indian Ocean in World Politics - 15PPOH032 (0.5 - Term 2 Unit) Political Thought on the Just Rebellion - 15PPOH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research - 15PPOH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Foreign Policy Analysis - 15PPOH013 (0.5 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 C. ONE of the following courses focussed on China in a cognate discipline: Economic problems and policies in modern China - 15PECC035 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Knowledge and Power in Early Modern China - 15PHIH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Nationhood and Competing Identities in Modern China - 15PHIH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 ( Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya - 15PSAC291 (1 Unit) - Full Year Language courses: students should chose the language they wish to take from the list below. They should then make contact with the relevant Course Convenor during welcome week who will assess which level of course would be appropriate, and will advise re. changing course enrolments if necessary. Elementary Spoken Cantonese (PG) - 15PCHC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year Elementary spoken Hokkien (Minnanyu, Taiwanese) (PG) - 15PCHC007 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 1 (PG) - 15PCHC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intensive Elementary Tibetan (PG) - 15PCHC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 D. Dissertation: this would focus on some aspect of Chinese Politics A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a place that accepts everyone for who they are, and where your individual talents are encouraged to shine. I do not regret my hesitant decision to come to SOAS, and hopefully, neither will you." Benita Ngere [-]

MSc Politics of Conflict, Rights & Justice

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The programme is designed for Masters students who are interested in the politics of human rights, humanitarianism and international and transitional justice especially in conflict and post-conflict states. It is also highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work in international NGOs, international organizations, think tanks and advocacy groups in the areas of rights, humanitarian assistance and transitional justice. It also looks more broadly at the future of global human rights in a world where, many claim, the influence of the West is declining and asks critical questions about the legitimacy and effectiveness of transitional justice mechanisms and humanitarian intervention. [+]

MSc Politics of Conflict, Rights & Justice Duration: Full Time: 1 Year, Part Time: 2-3 Years Minimum Entry Requirements: The qualification for entry is normally a first or upper-second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Politics or International Relations, or a related social science discipline. Applicants without such a background may be considered for admission depending on their academic training and undergraduate performance. Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? The programme is designed for Masters students who are interested in the politics of human rights, humanitarianism and international and transitional justice especially in conflict and post-conflict states. It is also highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work in international NGOs, international organizations, think tanks and advocacy groups in the areas of rights, humanitarian assistance and transitional justice. It also looks more broadly at the future of global human rights in a world where, many claim, the influence of the West is declining and asks critical questions about the legitimacy and effectiveness of transitional justice mechanisms and humanitarian intervention. Structure Structure, duration and requirements for gaining an award SOAS has standard requirements relating to the structure and duration of taught postgraduate programmes and for the award and classification of these programmes. Details can be found at http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/degreeregulations/file60379.pdf Programme structure Students take taught courses to the value of 3 full units + dissertation: 1. ALL half-units from A (compulsory) 2-3. Choose THREE half-units units from B. 4. Dissertation on some aspect of Conflict, Rights & Justice (compulsory). A. Compulsory Courses: The course ‘Conflict, Rights and Justice’ is the core course for the degree. Students must complete three compulsory courses, worth a total 67.5 points. Conflict, rights and justice - 15PPOH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Violence, justice and the politics of memory - 15PPOH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International Politics of Human Rights - 15PPOH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 B. Choose THREE from the following: You must choose three half-units, worth a total of 67.5 points, from the following list. Foreign Policy Analysis - 15PPOH013 (0.5 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 International migration and diaspora politics - 15PPOH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Security governance - 15PPOH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Comparative International Political Thought - 15PPOH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Queer Politics in Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PGNH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Political violence - 15PPOH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The Indian Ocean in World Politics - 15PPOH032 (0.5 - Term 2 Unit) Transitional Justice in Asia - 15PLAH036 (0.5 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Security - 15PDSH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Islamic/Democratic Political Thought - 15PPOC255 (1 Unit) - Full Year Approaches to Comparative Political Thought - 15PPOH028 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Law & Politics of State Violence: An Interdisciplinary Perspective - 15PPOH034 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Asian Security - 15PPOH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running C: Dissertation This would be focused on some aspect of Conflict, Rights & Justice. Dissertation in Political Studies - 15PPOC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning Knowledge Learning outcomes acquired in the following ways: Students are required to attend all classes (lectures and seminars), study extensively on their own and prepare assessed as well as non-assessed work regularly. Through core course lectures and seminars as well as through assessed work including group discussions. Through teaching in core and optional courses Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation. Intellectual (thinking) skills Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways: These are fostered in all courses offered in the program where the information students receive needs to be assessed critically and conflicting interpretations arising from the same information discussed. Students are encouraged not simply to summarise evidence and arguments but through application of critical questioning to develop their own assessments of the relative value of a range of arguments/sources of evidence. Through the structure and content of the core course in conflict, rights and justice and other program and optional courses. Students will prepare class presentations on topics selected from the core course and options reading lists. They also carry out individual, independent dissertation work, including refining a broad ‘topic’ into a narrower, manageable and more precise research question/hypothesis. Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation. Subject-based practical skills Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways: Through independent work for dissertations and preparation for class presentations. Through work on own, departmental dissertation guidance notes and meetings, meetings with supervisor. Through required regular readings for weekly seminar discussions. Through demonstration in lectures, through discussion in seminars, through questions in exams. Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.. Transferable skills Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways: Through seminar presentations, discussions, group work and essays. Through essays, project and dissertation Through group project work. Through classroom participation in seminars Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation. A Student's Perspective "The MSc in Middle East Politics allowed me to take both Politics courses and a language option, all of which I enjoyed. The lecturers were fantastic! My favourite class was Politics of Resistance in the Middle East which was clearly helpful for understanding contemporary politics of the region." Judith Nubold [-]

MSc Public Financial Management

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme provides students with a conceptual understanding of the core principles of public financial management, and with the development of capabilities and skills to apply theoretical and domain knowledge to problems encountered in the financial management of public sector organisations. [+]

MSc Public Financial Management Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two or Three calendar years (part-time) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum first degree with good grades in any subject equivalent to a UK upper second class honours Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This programme provides students with a conceptual understanding of the core principles of public financial management, and with the development of capabilities and skills to apply theoretical and domain knowledge to problems encountered in the financial management of public sector organisations. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a rigorous, scientifically based course of study in the theories underpinning how public finances are managed; how public managers make sound financial decisions; what kind of techniques and tools are used in the financial management of public sector organisations; and how the financial management of public sector organisations is reported to the public. Graduates will have a solid understanding of public financial management that should place them in a good position to pursue a career, or advance their career, in the civil service, local government, NGOs, and super-national organisations. Structure The MSc Public Financial Management has three components: Five core courses to the value of 2.5 units An elective course to the value of 0.5 unit Dissertation of 10,000 words on an approved topic (1 unit) The 10,000-word dissertation is worth 25% of your final mark. During term 2 you will submit your dissertation proposal and select an academic supervisor. Over the ensuing months you should meet with your supervisor at least three times before the end of term 3 for guidance. The bulk of your dissertation will be written over the summer to meet the mid-September deadline. Not all elective courses are offered every year; please check your preferences with the Programme Convenor. Part-time Study Part-time students are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, then two core and one elective courses plus the dissertation during the second year. Core Modules Public Financial Management: Planning and Performance - 15PFMC090 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Public Financial Management: Revenue - 15PFMC092 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Public Financial Management: Financial Reporting (IPSAS) - 15PFMC091 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Public Financial Management: Audit and Compliance - 15PFMC093 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Research methods in management - 15PFMC062 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Elective Modules Managing Organisational Change - 15PFMC089 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Macroeconomic Policy and Financial markets - 15PFMC087 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Managerial Accounting - 15PFMC088 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Public Policy and Management: Perspectives and Issues - 15PFMC094 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Public Policy and Strategy - 15PFMC095 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International human resource management - 15PFMC078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Dissertation Destinations Building on the distance learning version of the programme, the Department of Financial and Management Studies (DeFiMS) maintains close links with employers in both the United Kingdom and abroad. We expect that many of our graduates will be employed as civil servants in central government administrations, governmental agencies, local governments, NGOs, super-national organisations, and consulting firms. A Student's Perspective "The friendly research atmosphere, extensive library resources and academic training courses will help to stimulate your inspiration, promote your talent, and push yourself to new academic heights. " Boying Xu [-]

MSc Public Financial Management (Distance Learning)

Online Full time Part time August 2017 United Kingdom London

This programme will provide you with skills and knowledge in the field of public finance. It ranges across all applications, whether in budgeting, revenue policy, financial reporting and audit, compliance or where financial matters take a central position in policy, such as in public-private partnerships or fiscal decentralisation. [+]

Start of programme: November / February / April / June / August Mode of Attendance: Distance Learning This programme will provide you with skills and knowledge in the field of public finance. It ranges across all applications, whether in budgeting, revenue policy, financial reporting and audit, compliance or where financial matters take a central position in policy, such as in public-private partnerships or fiscal decentralisation. Find out more To find out more about this programme, including module details, fees and entry requirements, please visit the MSc Public Financial Management section of the Centre for Financial and Management Studies website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/cefims/programmes/msc-public-financial-management/ [-]

MSc Public Policy and Management

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme provides students with the analytical tools needed to understand the principles and methods of modern public policy and management, and enable them to make financial decisions and policy choices in the financing and management of infrastructure and services in the public sector. Students take courses in Public Policy and Strategy, Public Policy and Management, Managing Organisational Change. Perspectives and Issues, and Research Methods. [+]

MSc Public Policy and Management Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two or Three calendar years (part-time) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum first degree with good grades in any subject equivalent to a UK upper second class honours Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This programme provides students with the analytical tools needed to understand the principles and methods of modern public policy and management, and enable them to make financial decisions and policy choices in the financing and management of infrastructure and services in the public sector. Students take courses in Public Policy and Strategy, Public Policy and Management, Managing Organisational Change. Perspectives and Issues, and Research Methods. In addition, students have the possibility to take courses on Public Financial Management: Planning and Performance, Public Financial Management: Revenues, Public Financial Management: Financial Reporting, Public Financial Management (Audit and Compliance), Macroeconomic Policy and Financial Markets, and Managerial Accounting. The programme aims to provide students with a conceptual understanding of the core principles of public policy and public management, and with a development of capabilities and skills to apply theoretical and domain knowledge to problems encountered in public sector organisations. Structure The MSc Public Policy and Management has three components: Four core courses to the value of 2.0 units Elective course(s) to the value of 1.0 unit Dissertation of 10,000 words on an approved topic (1 unit) The 10,000-word dissertation is worth 25% of your final mark. During term 2 you will submit your dissertation proposal and select an academic supervisor. Over the ensuing months you should meet with your supervisor at least three times before the end of term 3 for guidance. The bulk of your dissertation will be written over the summer to meet the mid-September deadline. Not all elective courses are offered every year; please check your preferences with the Programme Convenor. Also note that if half units are selected, one term 1 course and one term 2 course needs to be chosen. Part-time Study Part-time students are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, then one core and two elective courses plus the dissertation during the second year. Those enrolled on the three-year programme are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, one core and two elective courses in the second year, and the dissertation in the third year. Core Modules Public Policy and Management: Perspectives and Issues - 15PFMC094 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Public Policy and Strategy - 15PFMC095 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Managing Organisational Change - 15PFMC089 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Research methods in management - 15PFMC062 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Elective Modules Public Financial Management: Planning and Performance - 15PFMC090 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Public Financial Management: Financial Reporting (IPSAS) - 15PFMC091 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Public Financial Management: Revenue - 15PFMC092 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Macroeconomic Policy and Financial markets - 15PFMC087 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Public Financial Management: Audit and Compliance - 15PFMC093 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Managerial Accounting - 15PFMC088 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International human resource management - 15PFMC078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Dissertation Destinations Building on the distance learning version of the programme, the Department of Financial and Management Studies (DeFiMS) maintains close links with employers in both the United Kingdom and abroad. We expect that many of our graduates will be employed as civil servants in central government administrations, governmental agencies, local governments, NGOs, super-national organisations, and consulting firms. A Student's Perspective "The Finance & Financial Law program was fantastic in its ability to blend the relevance of legal constructs with the more technical elements of finance, without sacrificing depth for breadth. This approach was especially useful for those of us who had had exposure to finance and law, but not both at the same time, or in such an integrated manner. " Andre Keuck [-]

MSc Research for International Development

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 United Kingdom London

The MSc Research for International Development is a newly established interdisciplinary Taught Masters programme at SOAS, offered jointly by the departments of Economics and Development Studies. This cutting-edge degree is funded and supported by the UK’s ESRC (The Economic and Social Research Council) as part of the Bloomsbury Doctoral Training Centre. [+]

Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for?: The degree has been developed to meet the needs of both development practitioners and researchers on international development, including those wishing to pursue an MPhil/PhD in International Development. The programme will suit students with a variety of backgrounds in social sciences, including politics, sociology, economics, and so on. It would also meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs. Students with a strong interest in research and research methods will thrive on the MSc distinctive focus on training in research methods. The MSc Research for International Development is a newly established interdisciplinary Taught Masters programme at SOAS, offered jointly by the departments of Economics and Development Studies. This cutting-edge degree is funded and supported by the UK’s ESRC (The Economic and Social Research Council) as part of the Bloomsbury Doctoral Training Centre. The programme’s unique twenty-week core module Battlefield of Methods: Approaches to International Development equips students with the theoretical background and analytical skills to inquire into the relationship between theory and method in the domain of international development. The module provides students with knowledge about the plurality of methodological approaches in key areas of international development research, and the policy choices and strategies associated with these. The module offers students the opportunity to engage with a selection of methods used in international development research. Further training in a variety of research methods is the focus of the other two core modules: Research Methods in Political Economy I and II. RMI covers the necessary statistical methods for social sciences including survey design and regression analysis. It aims to a) introduce students to statistical inference; b) encourage the clear and coherent expression of statistical results; and c) promote the critical reading of statistics within the development literature. RMII addresses sources and methods for the social sciences in the context of the political economy of development. This programme gives students advanced interdisciplinary training in research methods and topics in Research for International Development. While the programme structure emphasises research methods, students will also have the opportunity to choose from a large number of substantive optional modules. The interdisciplinary nature of the programme is by virtue of both the core modules and options available for study being drawn from two departments within SOAS: Economics and Development Studies. Students will therefore benefit from studying with experts in a variety of fields of international development, and from the wide regional expertise in developing countries and development issues. For details of entry requirement, duration, course structure, and fees, please visit SOAS website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msc-research-for-international-development/ [-]

MSc State, Society and Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This MSc programme seeks to explain state-society relations and development in Asia, Africa and (where appropriate) Latin America through the sub-disciplines of comparative political sociology and comparative/international political economy. Students will study the core concepts of these sub-disciplines such as: state; civil society; social closure; class; bureaucracy; patrimonialism; hegemony; late-industrialisation; product cycle; developmental state; rent-seeking; good governance; and globalization. [+]

MSc State, Society and Development Duration: May be taken full-time over one year, or part-time over two or three years. Minimum Entry Requirements: The qualification for entry is normally a first or upper-second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Politics or International Relations, or a related social science discipline. Applicants without such a background may be considered for admission depending on their academic training and undergraduate performance. Start of programme: September intake only This MSc programme seeks to explain state-society relations and development in Asia, Africa and (where appropriate) Latin America through the sub-disciplines of comparative political sociology and comparative/international political economy. Students will study the core concepts of these sub-disciplines such as: state; civil society; social closure; class; bureaucracy; patrimonialism; hegemony; late-industrialisation; product cycle; developmental state; rent-seeking; good governance; and globalization. They will also be exposed to the principal analytical perspectives of political science such as historical institutionalism, rational choice theory and Marxism. These intellectual foundations will enable students to gain a better understanding of the shaping factors behind phenomena such as: state collapse and criminalisation in Africa; cronyism in Southeast Asia and Latin America; religious fundamentalism in South Asia; economic take-off in East Asia; linguistic nationalism in Central Asia; the ‘third wave’ of democratisation; global financial instability; and the relationship between the Washington Institutions and the South. Students will also come to understand the usefulness of cross-regional comparison by seeing how the study of one region can illuminate similar issues elsewhere, despite differing cultural contexts. Structure Students take taught courses to the value of 3 full units + dissertation: 1. ONE or TWO units from A; 2-3. ONE or TWO units (or equivalent half-units) from B and/or C; 4. Dissertation on some aspect of State & Development or State & Society (compulsory) from D. A. ONE or TWO of the following DISCIPLINARY Politics Courses: State & society in Asia & Africa - 15PPOC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Politics of Globalisation and Development in Asia and Africa - 15PPOC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year B. ONE or TWO of the following REGIONAL Politics Courses: Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Government and politics of modern South East Asia - 15PPOC247 (1 Unit) - Full Year State and society in the Chinese political process - 15PPOC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Northeast Asian politics: Japan, Korea and Taiwan - 15PPOC253 (1 Unit) - Full Year State and Society in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Geopolitics and Security in Central Asia and the Caucasus - 15PPOH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Political society in the Middle East - 15PPOH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 State and transformation in the Middle East - 15PPOH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year Japan Unravelled - 15PPOH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The Indian Ocean in World Politics - 15PPOH032 (0.5 - Term 2 Unit) Asian Security - 15PPOH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running C: ONE or TWO of the following DISCIPLINARY optional courses Political Thought on the Just Rebellion - 15PPOH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Political violence - 15PPOH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Approaches to Comparative Political Thought - 15PPOH028 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research - 15PPOH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 D: Dissertation Following the DISCIPLINARY perspective (State and Development or State and Society) of the chosen pathway. Dissertation in Political Studies - 15PPOC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. A Student's Perspective "SOAS is renowned worldwide for its academic excellence and friendly atmosphere, as well as its focus on Asia, Africa and Middle East. Given my passion for development in Africa and the regional focus of my studies, there was only one place that could offer me what I wanted – and that is SOAS." Osman Diallo [-]

MSc Sustainable Development (Distance Learning)

Distance learning Full time Part time 2 - 5  February 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme aims to provide students with a broad grounding in the main concepts associated with sustainable development, but also provides the opportunity to specialise in one area in greater depth. [+]

Mode of Attendance: Distance Learning The rationale for this innovative sustainable development programme of study lies in the global environmental and development challenges that have been articulated in the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. It is clear that solutions to the challenge of sustainable development require holistic, integrated and co-ordinated actions across a very wide range of sectors, and will increasingly require a multidisciplinary approach. This programme aims to provide students with a broad grounding in the main concepts associated with sustainable development, but also provides the opportunity to specialise in one area in greater depth. Programme start February and May annually Duration2 – 5 years. Students take an average of 3 years to complete the MSc programme. Time commitment The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June. For the 30-week study period, you will need to allocate 5-6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15-week session, 10-12 hours per module, per week, is recommended. Study materials Once registered, you will be sent a comprehensive study package for each of your chosen modules. This includes: A detailed study guide. Composed of ten units, this incorporates exercises, assignments and other activities into the study text, which will take you through your programme of self-directed study. Most module study guides are now provided in electronic format. An indicative study calendar. This will assist you in planning your study, as well as highlighting deadlines such as those for Tutor Marked Assignments. Books and other published materials. Generally textbooks, these are acquired on your behalf and should provide background as well as key extracts necessary for study of the module. Integrated volumes of key readings. These are drawn from a wide range of sources and are provided as required readings. Information is also supplied regarding sources of further reading as well as weblinks, for students to look into should they so wish. Supplementary study materials. These are included where appropriate, and include items such as computer software Library access Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE provides easy access to study resources, as well as to fast and efficient academic and administrative support. It also enables you to be part of a learning community in a way in which distance learners have seldom been accustomed in the past. Visit the SOAS website for more information. [-]

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development draws on the exceptional expertise at SOAS in different disciplinary understanding of development challenges and processes as well as the strong commitment among all teaching staff to area expertise. Staff teaching on this programme are research active and have a range of links to international organisations. [+]

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development Duration: One calendar year (full-time). Two years(part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Relevant work experience may also be considered. Start of programme: September intake only Who is this programme for? The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of development and/or conflict, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science. The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs. As the pioneering programme of its kind internationally, this MSc programme develops detailed empirical knowledge and analytical skills for understanding the complex linkages between violent conflict and development, both historically and today. It enables students to explore these linkages both within specific country and regional contexts and in the context of global interdependencies and the ways these affect peace, war, and non-war violence. The programme introduces students to competing analytical approaches. It is multi-disciplinary though shaped by a particular interest in political economy. It encourages deep case study knowledge. And it offers students the ability to tailor their choice of optional courses and dissertation research to their own interests. The MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development draws on the exceptional expertise at SOAS in different disciplinary understanding of development challenges and processes as well as the strong commitment among all teaching staff to area expertise. Staff teaching on this programme are research active and have a range of links to international organisations. The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in the patterns of violence internationally, in how violence affects development, and in how the uneven processes of development themselves may both generate violence and generate mechanisms for containing violence. Highlights include: Zoe's Blog! A convenor's-eye view of the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme Exploration of the long history of theories of human violence Relationships between violence and long-run historical change The concept of a continuum of violence The relevance of historical and more recent evidence that the process of structural change involved in ‘development’ is inherently conflictual and often violent To what extent democratisation is a mechanism for securing perpetual peace The challenges of understanding gender based violence Whether abundant natural resources, or high levels of inequality, or clear markers of religious or ethnic difference are clear sources of violent conflict How highly localised violent conflicts are connected to processes of global economic development The challenges of post-conflict reconstruction and ‘war to peace transitions’ The role of NGOs in causes of, dynamics of, and responses to conflict Explaining the prevalence of high levels of non-war violence Explanations of the political economy of – and alternative perspectives on – terrorism Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Structure There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development. They then select one of three ‘development’ modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; or Anthropology of Development. Through these modules, students build their analytical skills and their knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students put together a group case study presentation. Specialisation Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules). By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals. Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure. Core Modules All students take Violence, Conflict and Development. Then select either Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development or Anthropology of Development. The dissertation is compulsory. Political economy of violence, conflict and development - 15PDSC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year Political economy of development - 15PDSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory, policy and practice of development - 15PDSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year Anthropology of Development - 15PANC090 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Development Studies - 15PDSC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Non-Assessed Courses All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics. Optional Modules - Development Studies Students may choose optional modules (one full module or two half modules) from the list below. Please check to ensure that any module in which you have a special interest is running in the year that you wish to study. In addition, access to relevant modules in other departments may be negotiated subject to the agreement of both Convenors. Agrarian Development, Food Policy and Rural Poverty - 15PDSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Aid and development - 15PDSH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Borders and Development - 15PDSH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Civil society, social movements and the development process - 15PDSH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Natural resources, development and change: putting critical analysis into practice - 15PDSH031 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Development practice - 15PDSH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Environment, Governance and Development - 15PDSH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Extractive Industries, Energy, Biofuels and Development in a Time of Climate Change - 15PDSH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Famine and food security - 15PDSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Fundamentals of research methods for Development Studies - 15PDSH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global commodity chains, production networks and informal work - 15PDSH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Global Health and Development - 15PDSH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Issues in forced migration - 15PDSH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Marxist Political Economy and Global Development - 15PDSH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Migration and Policy - 15PDSH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Neoliberalism, Democracy and Global Development - 15PDSH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Problems of development in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PDSH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Security - 15PDSH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The working poor and development - 15PDSH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Understanding economic migration: Theories, Patterns and Policies - 15PDSH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 War to peace transitions - 15PDSH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Water and development:conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Open Options in Other Departments Economics Department Economic development in Africa - 15PECC203 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region - 15PECC334 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic problems and policies in modern China - 15PECC035 (1 Unit) - Full Year The political economy of development in Africa - 15PECH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Politics and International Studies Department Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Politics of Globalisation and Development in Asia and Africa - 15PPOC017 (1 Unit) - Full Year Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year School of Law Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit) - Full Year Human Rights in The Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit) - Full Year International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit) - Full Year Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit) - Full Year Water Law: Justice and Governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropology and Sociology Department Therapy and Culture - 15PANH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 History Department Environmental History of Asia - 15PHIH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 South Asia Department Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya - 15PSAC291 (1 Unit) - Full Year Imagining Pakistan: culture, politics, gender (MA) - 15PSAC313 (1 Unit) - Full Year Study of Religions Religions and Development - 15PSRH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Materials SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Teaching & Learning Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Destinations MSc Violence, Conflict & Development postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include analytical skills, presentation skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates from MsC Violence, Conflict & Development have gone on to work in a range of different organisations, including Development and Human Rights Organisations, and many have continuted in the field of research. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: ActionAid Amnesty International BBC World Service British Overseas Network for Development NGOs Department for International Development Embassy of the Republic of Korea to Finland European Bank for Reconstruction & Development Fairtrade International Foundation Rwanda Immigration Advisory Service Institute for Human Development Institute for Public Policy Research International Land Coalition (ILC) Islamic Relief Worldwide Landmine Action Mekong Economics Ltd NATO Overseas Development Institute Save the Children The Climate Group The Japan Foundation The World Bank UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations UNICEF Libya Response Team World Health Organization Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Regional Project Development Intern For Africa Emergencies Programme Manager International Mobilisation Coordinator Development Officer Broadcasting Journalist Humanitarian Policy Advisor East and Central Africa Projects Manager Horn of Africa Analyst Global Policy Consultant Operational Support Officer Senior Project Manager Development Economist Journalist Defense Policy and Strategy Analyst Director Counter Extremism and Deradicalization Political Researcher International Programmes Officer Ethical Trade Executive Education Coordinator Community Investment Coordinator Women and Peace building Specialist Programme Analyst A Student's Perspective "Previously I just dreamed about SOAS. I had some lectures on Africa while studying Social Anthropology in Hungary, and I discovered that my professor had studied at SOAS. This made me work hard to join SOAS." Katalin Kovacs [-]

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development (Palestine Pathway)

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Applicants apply for the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme but can decide to follow the Palestine Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab). [+]

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development (Palestine Pathway) Duration: One calendar year (full-time). Two years(part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Relevant work experience may also be considered. Start of programme: September intake only Who is this programme for? Applicants apply for the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme but can decide to follow the Palestine Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab). We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development and/or conflict, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, development issues in Palestine. Students taking the Palestine Pathway will develop a specialist understanding of Development Studies in the context of Palestine. Development and conflict issues in Palestine are a major focus of NGO and international organisations that work in the Middle East. SOAS' recognised strengths in this area, including the establishment of the Centre for Palestine Studies, makes this a unique and exciting opportunity for those interested in Palestine. Structure Applicants apply for, and will be formally enrolled on, the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme. Students wishing to follow the Palestine Studies Pathway will take two core modules in Development Studies (Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development, and either Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development, or Anthropology of Development), two modules specific to Palestine and a dissertation (which must be written on a Palestine-related topic). If the above combination of modules has been successfully completed, students may request that the following specialism appears on their final degree transcript: 'MSc Violence, Conflict and Development with special reference to Palestine'. Political economy of violence, conflict and development - 15PDSC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year Political economy of development - 15PDSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory, policy and practice of development - 15PDSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year Anthropology of Development - 15PANC090 (1 Unit) - Full Year Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies I: History and Politics - 15PNMH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies II: Culture and Society - 15PNMH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Dissertation in Development Studies - 15PDSC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Non-Assessed Courses All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics. Materials SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Teaching & Learning Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Lectures Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. Seminars At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work. Dissertation A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory. Destinations MSc Violence, Conflict & Development postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include analytical skills, presentation skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates from MsC Violence, Conflict & Development have gone on to work in a range of different organisations, including Development and Human Rights Organisations, and many have continuted in the field of research. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: ActionAid Amnesty International BBC World Service British Overseas Network for Development NGOs Department for International Development Embassy of the Republic of Korea to Finland European Bank for Reconstruction & Development Fairtrade International Foundation Rwanda Immigration Advisory Service Institute for Human Development Institute for Public Policy Research International Land Coalition (ILC) Islamic Relief Worldwide Landmine Action Mekong Economics Ltd NATO Overseas Development Institute Save the Children The Climate Group The Japan Foundation The World Bank UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations UNICEF Libya Response Team World Health Organization Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Regional Project Development Intern For Africa Emergencies Programme Manager International Mobilisation Coordinator Development Officer Broadcasting Journalist Humanitarian Policy Advisor East and Central Africa Projects Manager Horn of Africa Analyst Global Policy Consultant Operational Support Officer Senior Project Manager Development Economist Journalist Defense Policy and Strategy Analyst Director Counter Extremism and Deradicalization Political Researcher International Programmes Officer Ethical Trade Executive Education Coordinator Community Investment Coordinator Women and Peace building Specialist Programme Analyst A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a unique University that combines both academic excellence and a vibrant, active and innovative student body." Ingrida Kerusauskaite [-]

MA

MA ... and Intensive Language (Arabic)

Campus Full time Part time 2 - 4  August 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with the Arab Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language. [+]

MA ... and Intensive Language (Arabic) Duration: Full time: 2 years. Part time: 4 years. Minimum Entry Requirements: SOAS has general minimum entrance requirements for registration for a postgraduate taught degree and these can be viewed at http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/ Students wishing to take certain options as their Major will normally be expected to have their 1st degree in that discipline. This applies to those wishing to have their Major in Social Anthropology, Economics, Politics (of the Middle East), and Law. Who is this programme for? The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with the Arab Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language. In the two-year pathway, students can take intensive Arabic language with either MA Islamic Societies and Cultures, MA Near and Middle Eastern Studies, or MA Palestine Studies, therefore making these programmes unique in Europe. The student will be provided with a near proficient ability in the Arabic language. Combinations May be combined with MA Islamic Societies and Cultures MA Near and Middle Eastern Studies MA Palestine Studies MA History MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia MA Religions of Asia and Africa MA Medical Anthropology MA Anthropological Research Methods MA Migration and Diaspora Studies Once you have checked the structure for this programme via the structure tab, please click into the above discipline that you would like to study. You will then see the full list of optional courses available to you. Structure In the two-year language pathway, students take two units of Arabic and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school in Jordan. Upon their return, they will take one unit of Arabic in their second year and two discipline units. They would also be expected to choose a Major in which to write the dissertation. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA. For the part-time four year pathway, please refer to the programme specification (attached below) of your preferred discipline. The intensive language courses will be assessed by a combination of exams and continuous assessment, involving in-class tests. The assessment in the summer school is handed over to the partner university but will be counted as one unit. Intermediate Arabic/English Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC418 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Higher Intermediate Arabic/English/Arabic Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC419 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Advanced Arabic/English/Arabic Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC420 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intensive Advanced Summer Arabic (PG) - 15PNMC416 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning Learning outcomes will vary depending on the combination of courses chosen by individual students. Learning outcomes for each course can be found under the information provided on the relevant list of postgraduate courses on the departmental page of the SOAS website. In general, by the end of the course students will have learnt the following: Knowledge: How to assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts and digital sources, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, locate materials, use research-sources (particularly research-library catalogues) and other relevant traditional sources. Subject-specific skills are an amalgam of the skills described for each of the three options chosen by candidates from the cross-department/faculty choices available in the relevant course-descriptors. Intellectual (thinking) skills: Students will learn to become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and should also come to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us. Students will learn to question interpretations, however authoritative, and reassess evidence for themselves. Communicate effectively in writing subject-based practical skills. Language-students will learn the chosen language at the appropriate level. Present seminar-papers. Listen and discuss ideas introduced during seminars. Practise research-techniques in a variety of specialised research-libraries and institutes. Transferable skills: Writing good essays and dissertations. Structure and communicate ideas effectively, both orally and in writing. Study a variety of written and digital materials in libraries and research-institutes of a kind they will not have used as undergraduates. Present (non-assessed) material orally. To acquire/develop skills in Arabic language to Effective Operational Proficiency level. To demonstrate awareness of the conceptual and communicative underpinnings of Arabic and through this interlinguistic and intercultural understanding. Communicate in written and spoken medium in contemporary Arabic. Engage with people from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds, understand the role of different frames of reference. A Student's Perspective "Academically studying at SOAS has been incredible. At first I thought that getting to meet the big-name professors from my field would be the most enjoyable part of my experience but now I actually think it has been the other students." Quinn Connors, Tufts University [-]

MA ... and Intensive Language (Japanese)

Campus Full time Part time 2 - 4  August 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The two-year language pathway is directed at students with a professional and academic interest in Japan. The intensive training in Japanese language aims at supporting students’ ability to tackle their disciplinary interests by engaging with written texts and in oral communication in Japanese. [+]

MA ... and Intensive Language (Japanese) Duration: 2 yr pathway: full time (2 years) or part time (4 years). Who is this programme for? The two-year language pathway is directed at students with a professional and academic interest in Japan. The intensive training in Japanese language aims at supporting students’ ability to tackle their disciplinary interests by engaging with written texts and in oral communication in Japanese. Your chosen discipline is combined with intensive Japanese language over two years (including a period in Japan), making this programme unique in Europe. Access to the Japanese language pathway is currently available for students with a) beginner, or b) post-beginner level of proficiency. As a point of reference for b), this would correspond to having completed Minna no Nihongo, Volumes 1 and 2 (or an equivalent text), knowledge of approximately 500 kanji, and tuition time of about 220 hours in total. The list of kanji is available here, and a sample test is available here. Students’ proficiency levels will be assessed through a placement test during registration week (specific dates will be provided to the applicants). Students bear the costs of travel to and from Japan, as well as living expenses during the period of their stay. Combinations May be combined with MA Japanese Studies MA Korean Studies MA Historical Research Methods MA History MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia MA Religions of Asia and Africa MA Medical Anthropology MA Anthropological Research Methods MA Migration and Diaspora Studies MA Linguistics and Language Once you have checked the structure for this programme via the structure tab, please click into the above discipline that you would like to study. You will then see the full list of optional courses available to you. Strusture In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, in the second year, they take one intensive language unit and two discipline units. They also choose a dissertation topic within their Major. Students must pass all of the language units in order to qualify for the degree with Intensive Japanese. In the two-year language pathway, the intensive language courses will be assessed by a combination of exams and continuous assessment, involving in-class tests. The assessment of the summer school element is conducted upon return to SOAS. Two years full-time: Year of study Course title Beginner entry Post-beginner entry 1 Intensive Elementary Japanese 1 Intensive 1 1 unit in discipline 1 unit in discipline Summer of Year 1 Intensive Japanese 2 (1 unit) Intensive Japanese 2 (1 unit) 2 Intermediate Japanese 2 OR: Advanced Japanese Contemporary Topics Intensive Japanese 3 (1 unit) 2 2 units in discipline 2 units in discipline 2 Dissertation in discipline Dissertation in discipline Four years part-time: Year of study Course title Beginner entry Post-beginner entry 1 Intensive Elementary Japanese 1 Intensive Japanese 1 (2 units) Summer of Year 1 Intensive Japanese 2 (1 unit) Intensive Japanese 2 (1 unit) 2 1 unit in discipline subject 1 unit in discipline subject 2 Intermediate Japanese 2 OR: Advanced Japanese Contemporary Topics Intensive Japanese 3 (1 unit) 3 1 unit in discipline subject 1 unit in discipline subject 4 1 unit in discipline subject 1 unit in discipline subject 4 Dissertation (1 unit) Dissertation (1 unit) Please check the Programme Specification for further information. Teaching & Learning Learning outcomes will vary depending on the combination of courses chosen by individual students. Learning outcomes for each course can be found under the information provided on the relevant list of postgraduate courses on the departmental page of the SOAS website. Knowledge Students will acquire a comprehensive understanding of Japan’s past and present, within the parameters of the courses and disciplines chosen. Students will acquire an advanced understanding of the theoretical and methodological tools of the relevant disciplines. Students will improve their knowledge of and ability to use Japanese in their everyday life and professional career. Intellectual (thinking) skills Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically from a variety of sources and how to resolve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations. Students will learn to evaluate the strengths of particular disciplinary and theoretical approaches, cultivating their ability to draw on a variety of such approaches. Students will learn how to design and manage an independent research project, formulating the problem to be addressed, identifying the data to be analyzed, and synthesizing the findings to present well-supported conclusions. Subject-based practical skills Students will learn how to read critically, to participate effectively in seminar discussions, and to present their work in both oral and written form. More specific skills will depend on the particular courses taken. Students will acquire/develop linguistic skills which will enable them to tackle written and spoken tasks in contexts relevant to them. Transferable skills Students will learn how to access and evaluate electronic and other data effectively and efficiently. Students will learn how to solve complex problems, for example concerning economic development, historical causation, literary interpretation, or political decision-making. Students will learn how to communicate effectively in a variety of settings and formats. A Student's Perspective "Aside from the incredible library, I would have to say that the commitment to learning that is shared by both students and staff members is a unique aspect of SOAS. Everyone is striving to do their best and to bring out the best in others. " Charlie Orr [-]

MA ... and Intensive Language (Korean)

Campus Full time Part time 2 - 4  August 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with Korea in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a high level of Korean language proficiency. [+]

MA ... and Intensive Language (Korean) Duration: Full time: 2 years Part time: 4 years Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? This will suit students wishing to embark on research degrees with a focus on Korea. Also, professionals wishing to pursue careers directly related to Korea, including government departments (of both the UK and other countries), and in firms requiring particular skills and knowledge related to trading, investment and promotional interests outside Europe. The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with Korea in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a high level of Korean language proficiency. This two-year programme (or four years part-time) will provide students with the opportunity to combine Masters’ level training with intensive Korean language study in order to acquire the skills necessary for future professional or research careers. The programme will enable students to engage with the subjects of their Masters’ programme in the context of Korea through Korean, to engage with primary Korean sources and data and to conduct research and professional work in Korea. Combinations May be combined with MA Korean Studies MA Japanese Studies MA Historical Research Methods MA History MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia MA Religions of Asia and Africa MA Medical Anthropology MA Anthropological Research Methods MA Migration and Diaspora Studies Once you have checked the structure for this programme via the structure tab, please click into the above discipline that you would like to study. You will then see the full list of optional courses available to you. Structure Students will take 4 course units of language over the two-year period, alongside the 3 units plus 1 unit of dissertation of their concurrent Masters programme. (Or the programme can be taken part-time over four years.) Progression can only be made if all language units are passed. If language units are failed, students are recommended to pursue the discipline only pathway. In the two-year language pathway, the intensive language courses will be assessed by a combination of exams and continuous assessment, involving in-class tests. The assessment in the summer school is handed over to the Korean partner university but will be counted as one unit. Teaching & Learning Knowledge To acquire/develop skills in Korean language to higher intermediate level. Intellectual (thinking) skills To demonstrate awareness of the conceptual and communicative underpinnings of Korean and through this interlinguistic and intercultural understanding. Subject-based practical skills Communicate in written and spoken medium in contemporary Korean. Transferable skills Engage with people from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds, understand the role of different frames of reference. A Student's Perspective "London is amazing. It is a big city, there is always something going on, always something interesting to do. Also, you can move around easily and fast. It is a frenetic life, but it is just part of the fun. If you want you can also relax in a park. I particularly love parks as there are not many in my city. You can enjoy art, nature and everything else in the same city. I really think it is amazing!" Fiorella Cerbasio, Erasmus [-]

MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 United Kingdom London

The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments. ISD aims to prepare students for a variety of roles, such as working within a Foreign Service or other government department; international civil service (such as the United Nations or European Union); international NGOs (working in fields such as development, humanitarian assistance and conflict resolution); multinational corporations and international media. The programme also suits those engaged in or considering research roles within a policy think tank, risk analysis organisation or doctoral programme and seeking to deepen their academic and practical understanding of international affairs and contemporary diplomatic practice. [+]

Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for?: The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments. ISD aims to prepare students for a variety of roles, such as working within a Foreign Service or other government department; international civil service (such as the United Nations or European Union); international NGOs (working in fields such as development, humanitarian assistance and conflict resolution); multinational corporations and international media. The programme also suits those engaged in or considering research roles within a policy think tank, risk analysis organisation or doctoral programme and seeking to deepen their academic and practical understanding of international affairs and contemporary diplomatic practice. The programme has a multi-disciplinary structure and draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. Students choose a combination of modules to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests. Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Geneva. Programme Objectives Excellent inter-disciplinary understanding of key concepts, theories and debates in the study of international affairs Excellent knowledge of international policy debates and principle issues from perspectives of both the global North and South Ability to undertake critical analysis of contemporary international policy issues and challenges Development of module specific practical skills such as policy analysis and policy advocacy, negotiation, mediation, communication and media relations. We welcome applications from academically strong individuals from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds; however, it is not necessary to have a first degree in a discipline directly related to the programme. Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field. For further details, please visit SOAS website: http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/ [-]

MA Advanced Chinese Studies

Campus Full time September 2017 United Kingdom London

The two-year MA Advanced Chinese Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. [+]

MA Advanced Chinese Studies Duration: 2 Year Full Time Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full-time The two-year MA Advanced Chinese Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Students on the programme take four taught courses at SOAS during their first year, including a team-taught core course provided by a range of SOAS China experts as well as a text-reading seminar allowing students to integrate their Chinese reading skills into their disciplinary studies. Further courses can be selected from available disciplines including Anthropology, Art and Archaeology, Cinema, Cultural and Regional Studies, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Music, Politics, and Study of Religions. In their second year, students will undertake an extended period of study at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, where they will follow a tailor-made bilingual programme in Chinese Studies. Options for short-term internships with local companies will be made available. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London. The programme is aimed at students pursuing careers in the academic world, business, government and the media that require a skill set which encompasses disciplinary rigour, comprehensive area knowledge and cultural and linguistic fluencies. Applicants should have at least intermediate-level proficiency in modern Chinese (HSK Level 4). The language element of the training will be tailored to meet the needs of students’ existing language skills. Alternative elements are available for applicants not in need of further Chinese language training, such as native speakers of Chinese. Structure In the first year at SOAS students on the programme take the team-taught core course provided by a range of SOAS China experts Approaches to Chinese Studies - 15PCIC001 and two taught courses (2 Units) from the list given below. In addition a text-reading seminar (1 Unit - 15PCIC003) allowing students to integrate their Chinese reading skills into their disciplinary studies. In their second year, students will undertake a Period of Study at Partner University (15PCIC004) at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, where they will follow a tailor-made bilingual programme in Chinese Studies. Options for short-term internships with local companies will be made available. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London (Extended Dissertation in Chinese Studies 15PCIC999). Thee courses should be chosen in close consultation with the programme convenor. Core Course Approaches to Chinese Studies - 15PCIC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year China and Inner Asia Modern Film from Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora - 15PCHH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern Chinese Literature (MA) - 15PCHC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Traditional Chinese Language and Literature - 15PCHC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2014/2015 Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Understanding Contemporary China - 15PCIC002 ( Unit) Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Available as a minor only Modern Documentary Texts - 15PEAC007 (1 Unit) - Full Year Taiwan Studies Society and Culture in Taiwan - 15PCHH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Language (minor only) Only one language course may be taken. Special Course in Chinese 1 (Postgraduate) - 15PCHC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese II (Postgraduate) - 15PCHC011 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 3 (Postgraduate) - 15PCHC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese IV (Postgraduate) - 15PCHC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese: Reading Classical and Literary Chinese (Postgraduate) - 15PCHC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Chinese: Advanced Chinese for Business and Management - 15PCHH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Elementary spoken Hokkien (Minnanyu, Taiwanese) (Postgraduate) - 15PCHC007 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2014/2015 Practical Translation: Chinese to English - 15PCHH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Practical Translation: English to Chinese - 15PCHH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Intensive Elementary Tibetan (Postgraduate) - 15PCHC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year Styles of Modern Chinese Literary Language - 15PCHC016 (1 Unit) - Full Year Art and Archaeology Art and Archaeology of the Silk Road - 15PARC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2014/2015 Ancient Chinese Civilisation - 15PARC026 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2014/2015 Available as a minor only Ceramics in Chinese Culture: 10th - 18th Centuries - 15PARH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropology and Sociology (minor only) Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1 Unit) - Full Year Media and Film Studies Japanese Transnational Cinema: From Kurosawa to Asia Extreme and Studio Ghibli - 15PJKH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Development Studies East Asia and globalisation - 15PDSH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Economics Economic problems and policies in modern China - 15PECC035 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic development of modern Taiwan - 15PECH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Economic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region - 15PECC334 (1 Unit) - Full Year Politics and International Studies Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year State and society in the Chinese political process - 15PPOC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year China and international politics - 15PPOC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year International politics of East Asia - 15PPOC251 (1 Unit) - Full Year Available as a minor only Northeast Asian politics: Japan, Korea and Taiwan - 15PPOC253 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year Chinese commercial law - 15PLAC106 (1 Unit) - Full Year Music Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2014/2015 Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Religion African Missionaries - 15PSRH043 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 East Asian Buddhist Thought - 15PSRH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-Modern Period - 15PSRC160 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2014/2015 The Great Tradition of Taoism - 15PSRH036 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2014/2015 Chinese Religious Texts: A Reading Seminar - 15PSRH038 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 History Knowledge and Power in Early Modern China - 15PHIH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Nationhood and Competing Identities in Modern China - 15PHIH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Teaching & Learning Lectures and Seminars Most courses require students to attend two or three hours of classes each week. This time will be spent in lectures, seminars, tutorial discussions and student presentations: the exact mixture of activities varies somewhat from course to course. At Masters level there is a particular emphasis on students’ contributions and presentations, and students are also expected to read extensively and prepare for each class in advance. Language courses typically involve more hours of contact time, especially at elementary level, and regular homework. The assessment on most courses consists of two or three coursework essay assignments and an unseen written examination, sat in April or May. However, some courses are assessed purely on the basis of coursework, including essays and reaction papers. Dissertation A 20,000-word dissertation will be written by each student on this programme after his/her return from China, for submission in September of the second year. The dissertation will be on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. The China and Inner Asia collection consists of approximately 200,000 volumes and 5,000 periodicals. A Student's Perspective "The MA in Advanced Chinese Studies is a programme unique in its comprehensive integration of Chinese-language materials with interdisciplinary studies of the history, society, and culture of China." Jake-Thurston [-]

MA African Literature

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in African Literature enables students to engage critically with varied aspects of oral and written literatures in Africa. The programme is unique in the way it encourages exploration of relationships between indigenous African aesthetics and contemporary literary theories. [+]

MA African Literature Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time The MA in African Literature enables students to engage critically with varied aspects of oral and written literatures in Africa. The programme is unique in the way it encourages exploration of relationships between indigenous African aesthetics and contemporary literary theories. The module ‘Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature’ provides theoretical and methodological skills while the programme’s other units focus on specific areas such as literatures in African languages and contemporary African literature in English. Structure All students are required to write a 10,000-word dissertation in the field of their major course, which allows them to carry out a substantial piece of independent academic work on a selected topic. The dissertation is taken in either the core module or in the module ‘Selected Topics’. Students must take the core module plus two modules from list A or B. List B modules assume a linguistic competence in the chosen language equivalent to that acquired in a first degree. Not all modules listed below may be offered every year, and new modules may become available. For an up-to-date list of modules on offer, please visit the relevant departmental website or contact the Faculty office. Some modules may be taught in other departments of the School. Core Module Literatures in African languages - 15PAFC124 (1 Unit) - Full Year List A: Pan-African Modules Travelling Africa: Writing the Cape to Cairo - 15PAFC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Research Methods In Translation Studies - 15PLIH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 African Philosophy (PG) - 15PAFH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Realism and Magical Realism in the Afrophone Novel (PG) - 15PAFC146 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Afrophone Philosophies (PG) - 15PAFH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 List B: Language-specific Modules Practical translation from and into Swahili - 15PAFC029 (1 Unit) - Full Year Directed Readings in an African Langauage - 15PAFC147 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Teaching & Learning The taught part of the course consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take. A 10,000-word dissertation written over the summer offers students the opportunity to develop original research in an area of special interest. The course is formulated within two tracks: Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations A postgraduate degree in African Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous African aesthetics and contemporary literary theories. Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face. The MA African Literature can lead to further study and research, however there is also a range of opportunities in fields such as: Education Publishing Archive work Arts Management Media A Student's Perspective "Previously I just dreamed about SOAS. I had some lectures on Africa while studying Social Anthropology in Hungary, and I discovered that my professor had studied at SOAS. This made me work hard to join SOAS." Katalin Kovacs [-]

MA African Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in African Studies provides an unrivalled programme of advanced modules on Africa; one of the world’s most fascinating and challenging regions. The opportunity for interdisciplinary study of the continent is a particular advantage of the degree. Students can choose from a range of about 30 modules in fourteen disciplines. [+]

MA African Studies Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time The MA in African Studies provides an unrivalled programme of advanced modules on Africa; one of the world’s most fascinating and challenging regions. The opportunity for interdisciplinary study of the continent is a particular advantage of the degree. Students can choose from a range of about 30 modules in fourteen disciplines. Our former students have chosen to study Africa at this level for a wide range of reasons. For some a deep interest in the history and culture or political economy of a particular region is sufficient motivation, but for many students the programme has, in addition, been followed with the intention of furthering their career opportunities. Some go on to work either in Africa or in fields related to Africa. The opportunity to combine study of particular African subjects with an African language is very useful, although some evidence of competence in learning a foreign language is usually required. Structure Students take three taught module units, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major. As the emphasis in the Regional Studies programmes is on interdisciplinary study, students are required to select their three module units from more than one subject. One module unit may be made up of two 0.5 unit modules. The subjects of the programme are: Anthropology, Art, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Media, Politics, Religious Studies, and Language. The two minor module units can be taken in the same subject (but different to that of the major), or two different ones. A language module can only be taken as a minor, and only one language module can be taken. Candidates who wish to take a language at other than introductory level will be assessed at the start of term to determine which is the most appropriate level of study. When applying, applicants are asked to specify their preferred major and minor subjects, and asked to give alternative choices as practical considerations such as time tabling and availability of modules may limit freedom of choice. Once enrolled, students have two weeks to finalise their choice of subjects and have the opportunity of sampling a variety of subjects through attending lectures etc. All modules are subject to availability. Module Options Anthropology (minor only) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 African and Asian Cultures in Britain - 15PANH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Art Arts and Society in sub-Saharan Africa - 15PARH052 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Modern and Contemporary Arts in Africa - 15PARH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Economics Economic development in Africa - 15PECC203 (1 Unit) - Full Year History Colonial Conquest and Social Change in Southern Africa - 15PHIH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Social and Cultural Transformations in Southern Africa Since 1945 - 15PHIH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Slavery in West Africa in the 19th and 20th Centuries - 15PHIH028 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Historical Perspectives on Gender in Africa - 15PHIH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Language (minor only) Amharic 1 (PG) - 15PAFC130 (1 Unit) - Full Year Amharic 2 (PG) - 15PAFC131 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hausa 1 (PG) - 15PAFC136 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hausa 2 (PG) - 15PAFC138 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Somali 1 (PG) - 15PAFC132 (1 Unit) - Full Year Somali 2 (PG) - 15PAFC133 (1 Unit) - Full Year Advanced Somali: Formal Usage (PG) - 15PAFC148 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Swahili 1 (PG) - 15PAFC140 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intermediate Swahili 2A (PG) - 15PAFC141 (1 Unit) - Full Year Swahili 3 (PG) - 15PAFC142 (1 Unit) - Full Year Practical translation from and into Swahili - 15PAFC029 (1 Unit) - Full Year Directed Readings in an African Langauage - 15PAFC147 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Yoruba 1 (PG) - 15PAFC134 (1 Unit) - Full Year Yoruba 2 (PG) - 15PAFC135 (1 Unit) - Full Year Zulu 1 (PG) - 15PAFC128 (1 Unit) - Full Year Zulu 2 (PG) - 15PAFC129 (1 Unit) - Full Year Zulu 3 (PG) - 15PAFC137 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Law Islamic Law (Ma/Llm) - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit) - Full Year Linguistics The Structure of Bantu Languages (PG) - 15PAFH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Literature Literatures in African languages - 15PAFC124 (1 Unit) - Full Year Travelling Africa: Writing the Cape to Cairo - 15PAFC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Realism and Magical Realism in the Afrophone Novel (PG) - 15PAFC146 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 African Philosophy (PG) - 15PAFH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Afrophone Philosophies (PG) - 15PAFH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Media The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Curating Africa: African Film and Video in the Age of Festivals - 15PAFH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Photography and the Image in Africa - 15PARH082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Politics Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year Religious Studies Preaching, Prayer and Politics: Independent Christians in Southern Africa - 15PSRH042 (0.5 unit Unit) Colonial and Christian Missions in Africa: Readings from the Archives - 15PSRH043 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Religions and Development - 15PSRH049 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Teaching & Learning Teaching is normally provided by lecture or seminar and students are required to attend such classes. Each student will be assigned a supervisor in connection with his or her dissertation. Lectures and Seminars Most modules involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take. Dissertation The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught modules. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations A postgraduate degree in African studies from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. Some MA African Studies graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face. Among a variety of professions, career paths may include: Academia; Charity; Community; Government; NGOs; Media; Publishing and UN Agencies. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: BBC News British Embassy Canon Collins Educational Trust for Southern Africa Goal Nigeria Government of Canada Hogan Lovells International LLP International Institute for Environment and Development Kenyan Government Mercy Corps Migrant Resource Centre Mo Ibrahim Foundation The London MENA Film Festival The University of Tokyo The World Bank Think Africa Press U.S. Embassy United Nations University of Namibia World Vision UK Zanabazar Museum of Fine Arts Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Development Producer Africa Editor Copywriter Director of Trade and Investment Projects and Fundraising Manager Head of Desk, Africa Senior Investment Manager Sports Writer Knowledge Management Projects Coordinator Project Director Presidential Advisor Commodity Manager Publisher Tutor Creative Consultant Lecturer in African Arts and Cultures East Africa Analyst Youth Volunteer Advisor Southern Region Educational Manager Head Specialists Giving + Insights A Student's Perspective "SOAS has a really good reputation and I learned as much from my peers as I did from my tutors." Frances Moffett-Kouadio [-]

MA Ancient Near Eastern Languages

Campus Part time 2 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London

The SOAS MA in Ancient Near Eastern Languages offers an intensive programme of text-reading and language-learning for those who already have a good knowledge of the Akkadian language - usually at least two years' experience. [+]

MA Ancient Near Eastern Languages Programme Code: Q9S1 Duration: Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) plus knowledge of Akkadian. NB: Due to its part-time nature, this programme is currently not available to students requiring a Tier 4 visa Interview Policy: Candidates will normally be interviewed Start of programme: September intake only The SOAS MA in Ancient Near Eastern Languages offers an intensive programme of text-reading and language-learning for those who already have a good knowledge of the Akkadian language - usually at least two years' experience. The degree is intended to widen the student's experience in the vast legacy of written documentation in Akkadian and other languages from ancient Mesopotamia and Anatolia. The programme is tailor-made to serve as an intermediate level between SOAS's three-year BA in Ancient Near Eastern Studies (or an equivalent qualification) and postgraduate Assyriological research at the level of MPhil and PhD. It can, of course, be taken for its own sake. Structure The degree comprises three taught courses chosen from the MA list and a dissertation on an agreed subject. The courses that are avaliable at SOAS in Akkadian, Sumerian and Hittite are in the list below. Instead of one of these SOAS courses candidates may, if qualified, take one of the following topics from MA programmes run by University College London: Hebrew and other North-West Semitic languages (MA in Hebrew and Jewish Studies) Ancient history, currently Change and Continuity in the Ancient Near East (MA in Ancient History, 91AHG003) Archaeology (MA in Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East) Not all the courses listed are available every year. Entry to courses run by University College is subject to the approval of the academic department in question (the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies, the Department of History, and the Institute of Archaeology). Courses avaliable at SOAS Mesopotamian Languages and Literature A: the third millennium - 15PNMC021 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Mesopotamian Languages and Literature B: the second millenium BC - 15PNMC022 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Mesopotamian Languages and Literature C: the first millenium bc - 15PNMC023 (1 Unit) - Full Year Sumerian Language - 15PNMC024 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Christians and Muslims in Syriac Texts - 15PSRC175 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hittite Language - 15PNMC025 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Teaching & Learning Course Information Courses are listed under the menu item Programme Structure on the left-hand side of this page. Each course is taught two or three hours weekly in small classes of usually one to five students. Courses in language and literature comprise the reading, translation and discussion of set texts. Thorough preparation is essential. Dissertation The dissertation will be on a topic agreed with the student's teachers and will extend to about 10,000 words. It may take the form of an extended essay on an approved topic or an edition with introduction and commentary of a previously unedited text or group of texts. The deadline for submission is 15 September in the year of examination. [-]

MA Anthropological Research Methods

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. [+]

MA Anthropological Research Methods Duration: 1 year full-time or 2/3 years part-time. The expectation in the UK is of continuous study across the year, with break periods used to read and to prepare coursework. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Social Anthropology. This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in Social Anthropology. Exceptionally this course may be taken as a conversion MA. Students who would like to take this path must demonstrate the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD. Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme. The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC. Structure Aims and Outcomes The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will: Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools; Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods. In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including: Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing. Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test). Discipline specific training in anthropology includes: Ethnographic methods and participant observation; Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research; The logistics of long-term fieldwork; Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures; Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and Language training. The Training Programme In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course: Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011). This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies). MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal. Dissertation MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes: A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature; An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology; A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget. The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day. Exemption from Training Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar. Learn a language as part of this programme Degree programmes at SOAS - including this one - can include language courses in more than forty African and Asian languages. It is SOAS students’ command of an African or Asian language which sets SOAS apart from other universities. Structure of Study A typical program of study would involve enrolling and passing (an asterisk * indicates a required component of the degree) three full units (this includes the two half units on research methods) and submitting a dissertation. Term 1 Generic Training Language Training AND/OR Special Course Option Anthropological Training Ethnographic Research Methods Research Training Seminar Work with Supervisor Term 2 Generic Training Language Training AND/OR Special Course Option Anthropological Training Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research Research Training Seminar Work with Supervisor Term 3 Research Training Seminar: presentations to subject group Work with Supervisor Submission of dissertation/research proposal Language Training Students can choose to study any African or Asian language that is normally available to students taking one of the taught masters programs. Option Courses Anthropology Option Courses Anthropology of Globalisation (PG) - 15PANH061 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Comparative Studies of Society and Culture - 15PANC073 (1 Unit) - Full Year Comparative Media Studies - 15PANC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Comparative Media Theory - 15PANH028 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in the Anthropology of Film - 15PANH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Anthropology of Food - 15PANC013 (1 Unit) - Full Year Anthropological approaches to agriculture, food and nutrition - 15PANH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Issues in the Anthropology of Gender - 15PANH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Cultural Understandings of Health - 15PANC093 (1 Unit) - Full Year Therapy and Culture - 15PANH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropology of Travel and Tourism - 15PANC098 (1 Unit) - Full Year Tourism and Travel: A Global Perspective - 15PANH059 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in Mind, Culture and Psychiatry - 15PANH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World - 15PANC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year African and Asian Cultures in Britain - 15PANH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Iranian media and film - 15PMSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Perspectives On Development - 15PANH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropology of Development - 15PANC090 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives A (Masters) - 15PANH047 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives B (Masters) - 15PANH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 - Must be taken with the first term course - 15PANH047 Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives A (Masters) Anthropology of Urban Space, Place and Architecture - 15PANH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Media Production Skills - 15PANH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Theory and Method in the Study of Religion - 15PSRC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Anthropology of Law - 15PANH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology of Human Rights (PG) - 15PANH058 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Year abroad No Teaching & Learning This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory. The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC) Destinations Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills. The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums. A Student's Perspective "You will establish and hone key analytical skills, amass a broad and in-depth knowledge of your chosen field and, from day one, befriend students from around the globe." David Whittaker [-]

MA Anthropological Research Methods and Intensive Language

Campus Full time Part time 2 - 4  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in social anthropology. The programme might also be taken as a stand-alone MA for those wanting training in anthropological research methods for professional development or practical application. [+]

MA Anthropological Research Methods and Intensive Language Duration: 2 year full-time or 4 years part-time. The expectation in the UK is of continuous study across the year, with break periods used to read and to prepare coursework. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Social Anthropology or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in Social Anthropology. Exceptionally this course may be taken as a conversion MA. Students who would like to take this path must demonstrate a solid grounding in the discipline as well as the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD. Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in social anthropology. The programme might also be taken as a stand-alone MA for those wanting training in anthropological research methods for professional development or practical application. It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Students who would like to take this path must demonstrate a solid grounding in the discipline as well as the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD. Exceptionally this course may be taken as a conversion MA. Students wishing to take this path must demonstrate a solid grounding in the discipline as well as the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD. The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MA Res) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training programme]. In the latter case, the MA Res therefore serves as a shortcut into the PhD. It is designed to train students in research skills, including language training, to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle (ag4@soas.ac.uk) for further information. The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (ak49@soas.ac.uk). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1. The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Structure The student must successfully complete the following core course: Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011) This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15 PPO H035, a 0.5 unit course, offered by the Department of Politics and International Studies). MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal. The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. A typical program of study would involve enrolling and passing three full units (this includes the two half units on research methods) and submitting a dissertation. In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and Research Methods in Anthropology (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA. Students can choose to study any African or Asian language that is normally available to students taking one of the taught masters programs. The two-year Intensive Language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language. Year abroad Yes (Summer of Year 1) Teaching & Learning The student must successfully complete the following core course: Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011) This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15 PPO H035, a 0.5 unit course, offered by the Department of Politics and International Studies). MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal. The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. A typical program of study would involve enrolling and passing three full units (this includes the two half units on research methods) and submitting a dissertation. In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and Research Methods in Anthropology (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA. Students can choose to study any African or Asian language that is normally available to students taking one of the taught masters programs. The two-year Intensive Language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language. A Student's Perspective "What has been the best thing about my time here? Everything. The course, the societies, the people. It’s sometimes hard to believe that it’s such a small university when you see how active all of the societies are. There’s always something to do, and the vibrancy and energy we have at SOAS both matches and is a testament to its prime location in London." Darryl Chan [-]

MA Anthropological Research Methods and Nepali

Campus Full time September 2017 United Kingdom London

This is the only Masters-level programme offered anywhere in the world that provides students who intend to proceed to conduct anthropological research (broadly defined) in Nepal with the necessary skills (disciplinary, linguistic, methodological). [+]

MA Anthropological Research Methods and Nepali Duration: 2 years Minimum Entry Requirements: Applicants will need to produce documented evidence of language learning ability (a language A level or equivalent, or successful completion of an undergraduate language course). Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full-time Who is this programme for? Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO. This is the only Masters-level programme offered anywhere in the world that provides students who intend to proceed to conduct anthropological research (broadly defined) in Nepal with the necessary skills (disciplinary, linguistic, methodological). What will this programme give the student an opportunity to achieve? The ability to read, write, speak and understand Nepali to a level suitable for field research in Nepal A grounding in the scholarly literature on Nepali history, society and culture Expertise in anthropological theory and practice that will provide a basis for research in a Nepali context Structure Year 1 Students take a 1.0 unit Nepali language course (either Nepali Language 1 or Nepali Language 2); 1.0 unit Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya; 1.0 unit Theoretical Approaches in Social Anthropology (or other anthropology options, chosen in consultation with programme convenor, for students with equivalent anthropology training); 0.5 unit Media Production Skills; and 0.5 units of anthropology options. Summer break between years 1 and 2 Two weeks of intensive Nepali language tuition at SOAS after the June exams, followed by two months in Kathmandu, attached to the Nepā School of Social Sciences and Humanities and the Bishwo Bhasa Campus of Tribhuvan University. At the end of the summer students will be required to submit a 5000-word preliminary fieldwork report and research proposal, accompanied by a 500-word abstract written in Nepali. Year 2 Students take the following courses: 1.5 unit Nepali for researchers; 1.0 unit Anthropological Research Methods (0.5 units Ethnographic Research Methods in term 1 and 0.5 units in Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research in term 2). They also attend the compulsory weekly MPhil Research Training Seminar in anthropology and write a 15,000 word MA Dissertation. Language courses will be assessed though a mixture of written papers and oral examinations. Non-language courses will be assessed on the basis of coursework essays and written papers. Year 1 African and Asian Cultures in Britain - 15PANH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropological approaches to agriculture, food and nutrition - 15PANH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology of Human Rights (PG) - 15PANH058 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Anthropology of Law - 15PANH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology of Urban Space, Place and Architecture - 15PANH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives A (Masters) - 15PANH047 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives B (Masters) - 15PANH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 - Must be taken with the first term course - 15PANH047 Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives A (Masters) Directed Practical Study in the Anthropology of Food - 15PANH045 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Issues in the Anthropology of Film - 15PANH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in the Anthropology of Gender - 15PANH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in Mind, Culture and Psychiatry - 15PANH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Media Production Skills - 15PANH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Perspectives On Development - 15PANH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Therapy and Culture - 15PANH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Tourism and Travel: A Global Perspective - 15PANH059 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya - 15PSAC291 (1 Unit) - Full Year Nepali Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC298 (1 Unit) - Full Year Summer Break Fieldwork report and research proposal Year 2 Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Nepali for Researchers - 15PSAC312 (1.5 Unit) - Full Year Research Methods in Anthropology - 15PANC011 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning What methods will be used to achieve the learning outcomes? Knowledge How to assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts and digital sources, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, locate materials, use research sources (particularly research library catalogues) and other relevant traditional sources. The Research Methods course focuses on teaching the various research methods associated with anthropological fieldwork including: participant observation, historical research, qualitative interviewing, quantitative data collection, Rapid Participatory Assessment, how to design questionnaires and, especially, on how to formulate a research question and design a project and consider the ethical issues involved. The Statistics courseworks on how to compile statistics, and how to critically assess statistics. The Research Training course, which is assessed by the Masters dissertation, works on students’ writing skills with an emphasis on thinking of the history of the discipline, writing to schedule, writing to requested word count, how to formulate a research question based on the material gathered, as well as how to do a presentation, how to comment on presentations and how to apply for funding. Term three looks at the strategies for working on the Masters’ dissertation and how to be upgraded at the start of the MPhil year. A good grounding in the sociocultural and political history of and contemporary sociocultural and political issues in Nepal, and familiarity with the scholarly literature on these topics. Proficiency in spoken and written Nepali sufficient for the purposes of anthropological field research: ability to conduct conversations and interviews, and read and synthesise information from Nepali written sources. Intellectual (thinking) skills Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, and reassess evidence for themselves. They should be able to design a research project, set a timetable, understand the principles of fieldwork, and consider questions of ethics. Students should learn to read each others’ work for both its strengths and weaknesses, develop their skills as public speakers, learn how to compose short abstracts of their project (for funding), be able to think critically and yet be open to being critiqued themselves. Subject-based practical skills The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills: Communicate effectively in writing, in both English and (at a less advanced level) Nepali Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources in both English and Nepali. Present seminar papers. Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars. Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes. Be prepared to do fieldwork for an anthropology PhD. Transferable skills The programme will encourage students to: Write good essays and dissertations. Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Understand unconventional ideas. Present (non–assessed) material orally. Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment. Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD. Be prepared to enter an Anthropology PhD programme and to be upgraded from MPhil to PhD in the shortest possible time. Destinations Students who study MA Anthropological Research Methods and Nepali develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills. The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums. A Student's Perspective "Let me put it like this: studying South Asia at SOAS is a greatly enriching experience." Michele Serafini (Italy) [-]

MA Anthropology of Food

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The SOAS MA programme in the Anthropology of Food offers students the opportunity to explore historically and culturally variable foodways, from foraging to industrial agriculture, from Europe and North America to Africa, Asia and South America. [+]

MA Anthropology of Food Duration: One calendar year (full-time); two or three years (part-time, daytime only). The expectation in the UK is of continuous study across the year, with break periods used to read and to prepare coursework. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class BA degree (or equivalent) in the humanities, social sciences or natural sciences, or significant experience in a relevant food- and/or agriculture-related career Food is a fundamental human necessity, essential to the sustenance of the human body. At the same time, food may be associated with pleasure, passion, even luxury. Food is also essential to the social body. Who eats what, who eats with whom, and whose appetites are satisfied and whose denied, are all profoundly social dynamics through which identities, relationships, and hierarchies are created and reproduced. The SOAS MA programme in the Anthropology of Food offers students the opportunity to explore historically and culturally variable foodways, from foraging to industrial agriculture, from Europe and North America to Africa, Asia and South America. The programme asks students to trace the passage of food from plant to palate, and to examine who benefits, and who suffers, from contemporary modes of food production, exchange, preparation, and consumption. Students examine food policy at national and international levels, as well as the role played in its formation by the food industry. Focus is given to the study of famine and the controversial role of food aid in securing food supplies. Debates over the impact of agricultural biotechnology on agrarian livelihoods and knowledge systems, as well as on the natural environment, are assessed. Movements toward organic agriculture, fair trade, and slow food are also analysed. An anthropological approach to the study of food draws upon and challenges the perspectives of other disciplines, whether agronomy or nutritional science, economics or law, history or literature. Dependent upon individual interests and experiences, graduates of the programme may pursue research degrees in any number of academic disciplines, or find employment in food-related government ministries, international organizations, development agencies, or non-governmental associations, as well as in the fields of public health, education, and media, or in the catering industry. Scholarships Applicants for the MA Anthropology of Food may be eligible to apply for Scholarships and Bursaries. Structure The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words. Core Courses: The Anthropology of Food - 15PANC013 (1.0 unit). Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Anthropology of Food and the candidate’s supervisor. Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units. Foundation Course: Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree. Option Courses: The remaining unit(s) of your programme, either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may then be selected from the Option Courses list below. Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses. However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected. Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. Programme Detail Core Courses The Anthropology of Food - 15PANC013 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Foundation Course Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Option Courses Anthropology Option Courses African and Asian Cultures in Britain - 15PANH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropological approaches to agriculture, food and nutrition - 15PANH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology of Globalisation (PG) - 15PANH061 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology of Human Rights (PG) - 15PANH058 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Anthropology of Law - 15PANH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology of Urban Space, Place and Architecture - 15PANH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Comparative Media Theory - 15PANH028 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives A (Masters) - 15PANH047 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives B (Masters) - 15PANH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 - Must be taken with the first term course - 15PANH047 Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives A (Masters) Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Directed Practical Study in the Anthropology of Food - 15PANH045 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Issues in the Anthropology of Film - 15PANH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Media Production Skills - 15PANH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Perspectives On Development - 15PANH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Therapy and Culture - 15PANH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Tourism and Travel: A Global Perspective - 15PANH059 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Courses taught outside the Department of Anthropology These courses are available subject to approval by the course convenor. Students may take no more than one full unit of courses taught outside of the Department of Anthropology. A language unit taught in the Faculty of Lanuages & Cultures may be taken. Agrarian Development, Food Policy and Rural Poverty - 15PDSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Civil society, social movements and the development process - 15PDSH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Extractive Industries, Energy, Biofuels and Development in a Time of Climate Change - 15PDSH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Famine and food security - 15PDSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender in the Middle East - 15PGNH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gendering migration & diasporas - 15PGNH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Globalisation and development - 15PDSC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year Jainism: History, Doctrine and the Contemporary World - 15PSRC024 (1 Unit) - Full Year Political economy of development - 15PDSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Natural resources, development and change: putting critical analysis into practice - 15PDSH031 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Non-Violence in Jain Scriptures, Philosophy and Law - 15PSRC062 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 The working poor and development - 15PDSH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 A Student's Perspective "When I first came here I was very surprised on how kind, polite and caring everyone was. From the staff to the students, everyone was very welcoming and enthusiastic. Coming from a corporate world and living in a big city like London, SOAS has been like an oasis in the desert; a very colourful, blissful environment which makes you feel at home." Nafsika Papacharalampous [-]

MA Anthropology of Media

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Anthropology of Media is a recent and rapidly growing field within the larger academic discipline of Anthropology. It both incorporates and challenges the well-established anthropological concerns with visual culture and ethnographic film through a more extensive examination of contemporary media practices. Along with the parallel disciplines of media and cultural studies, Anthropology of Media is now widely recognized as playing an increasingly important and critical role in current debates about media. [+]

MA Anthropology of Media Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. The expectation in the UK is of continuous study across the year, with break periods used to read and to prepare coursework. Minimum Entry Requirements: The minimum of an upper second-class BA degree (or equivalent). Some exceptions are made for those with significant experience in a relevant media related career. Start of programme: September intake only Who is this programme for? A wide range of students with different interests and backgrounds come to this programme from world over in order to explore why media matter. They are highly qualified with very diverse international interests. It is particularly suitable for: Students with a degree in media or cultural studies Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of media and cultural studies with special reference to Asia or Africa People with professional experience in film, television, journalism, advertising or public relations Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist media-related topics along with regional or language-based study Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in anthropology Our world is inescapably and continuously transformed through a proliferation of media. The MA in Anthropology of Media at SOAS takes up the challenge of understanding how and why media matter. The programme uniquely combines anthropology, media and cultural studies with specific regional expertise in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. It provides students with critical skills, research methods, a wide-ranging understanding of media and the opportunity to pursue original research projects. The MA in Anthropology and Media is the first and still the only programme in Europe that specialises in bringing together contemporary anthropological concerns with media and cultural studies. The MA in Anthropology of Media is a recent and rapidly growing field within the larger academic discipline of Anthropology. It both incorporates and challenges the well-established anthropological concerns with visual culture and ethnographic film through a more extensive examination of contemporary media practices. Along with the parallel disciplines of media and cultural studies, Anthropology of Media is now widely recognized as playing an increasingly important and critical role in current debates about media. It provides an alternative approach, which puts the emphasis upon studying the multiple relationships between people and media and thus seeks to anthropologise media and cultural studies. More than just focussing on media texts or technology, Anthropology of Media is marked by the centrality of people and how they relate to media. The SOAS programme in Anthropology of Media is designed to provide a detailed introduction to the study of media in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and their diasporas. We also use the theoretical and methodological contributions of Anthropology to build upon and challenge Euro-American media and cultural studies. The programme stresses ethnographic approaches to media as cultural practices in social and political contexts where people inhabit, create and engage with media worlds. Special Features The Department cultivates several specialist strengths which distinguish it from other anthropology departments in the UK. The most obvious of these is that all members of the Department are specialists on Africa and Asia. Particular attention is given to teaching and researching regional ethnographic areas of expertise. All staff members are simultaneously attached as anthropologists to this Department and as regional specialists to their appropriate regional studies centre within the School. SOAS also offers strong interdisciplinary support for the study of media including the Centre for Media and Film Studies and a highly regarded Department of Music. We have a dedicated multi-media suite, a radio station and satellite access to a wide range of world television. Further, the Library houses a major collection of books and journals on world media as well as extensive audio-visual materials. Structure The programme consists of four units in total: three units of taught examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words. Some courses may be taught in other departments in the school. Core Courses: Comparative Media Studies - 15 PAN C009 (1.0 unit). Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Anthropology of Media and the candidate’s supervisor. Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units. Foundation Course Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree. Option Courses: The remaining unit(s) of your programme, either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may then be selected from the Option Courses list below. Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses. However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected. Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. Programme Detail Compulsory Elements Comparative Media Studies - 15PANC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Foundation Course Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Option Courses Half Unit Anthropology Options African and Asian Cultures in Britain - 15PANH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropology of Human Rights (PG) - 15PANH058 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Anthropology of Globalisation (PG) - 15PANH061 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology of Law - 15PANH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology of Urban Space, Place and Architecture - 15PANH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives A (Masters) - 15PANH047 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives B (Masters) - 15PANH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 - Must be taken with the first term course - 15PANH047 Comparative Study of Islam: Anthropological Perspectives A (Masters) Anthropological approaches to agriculture, food and nutrition - 15PANH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Ethnographic Research Methods - 15PANH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in the Anthropology of Film - 15PANH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in the Anthropology of Gender - 15PANH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Media Production Skills - 15PANH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Therapy and Culture - 15PANH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Tourism and Travel: A Global Perspective - 15PANH059 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Diaspora Contexts and Visual Culture - 15PARH042 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Digital traditional broadcasting communication - 15PMSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian Cinema: Its History and Social Context - 15PSAH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Indian Cinema: Key Issues - 15PSAH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Iranian media and film - 15PMSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 International Political Communication - 15PMSH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Japanese Transnational Cinema: From Kurosawa to Asia Extreme and Studio Ghibli - 15PJKH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Mediated Culture in the Middle East: Politics and Communications - 15PMSH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Film from Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora - 15PCHH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Post-crisis Thai Cinema (1997-2007) - 15PSEH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 (Post) Colonialism and Otherness in South East Asia on Screen - 15PSEH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Sound Recording and Production - 15PMSH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use - 15PMSH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Transnational Communities and Diasporic Media:Networking, Connectivity, Identity - 15PMSH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Full Unit Anthropology Options May include a language unit taught in the Faculty of Languages & Cultures. Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Ethnomusicology in Practice - 15PMUC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Film and Society in the Middle East - 15PNMC230 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Japanese Television since 1953 - 15PJKC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Music in Selected Regions of Africa: Contexts and Structures - 15PMUC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Year abroad No Destinations A Masters in the Anthropology of Media at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised. This programme will endow students with specialist understanding of producers, audiences, and other cultural and social aspects of mass media. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism. Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. A Student's Perspective "I’m from Haiti, and my experiences there have helped me become sensitive to social and class struggles and political turmoil, which are topics that Anthropology provides tools for analysing." Adele Austin [-]

MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. [+]

MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism Duration: 1 year full-time or 2-3 years part-time. Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second class honours degree (or equivalent, e.g. 3.3 GPA or higher); other strong qualifications may be taken into account. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Our students come from all over the world, following BA study, a masters degree in another field, or work and travel experience. This combination of diverse backgrounds and skills creates a uniquely stimulating intellectual environment. Many of our graduates go on to a PhD; others pursue careers in research and consulting; NGOs; museums and other cultural institutions; travel-writing; alternative tourism enterprises; and government agencies. Programme Overview The SOAS MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism enables students to pursue specialist interests in global voluntary mobility while gaining advanced training in social and cultural anthropology in a world-leading department. Combining a rigorous set of core courses with options to suit each student’s unique interests, the programme is designed to accommodate students with or without a prior degree in Social Anthropology. Students will develop expertise in anthropological theory and practice; learn to undertake ethnographic research; and gain comprehensive grounding in the anthropological study of travel and tourism, including issues of development, political economy, cultural change, heritage, cross-cultural encounter, representation and meaning, space and place, commodification, and interconnections between diverse histories and cultures of travel worldwide. Tourism is not only a culturally and historically shaped form of travel, but a complex social field that spans the globe, comprised of diverse actors, institutions, activities, and modes of interaction that overlap with and cross-cross other forms of global interconnection. As a whole, it comprises the world's largest industry and the single greatest peacetime factor moving people around the globe. Both a manifestation and a medium of globalisation, tourism has profound significance in multiple realms of human life—economic, environmental, material, social, and cultural. This makes it an ideal lens through which to explore core themes in contemporary social anthropology, such as identity and alterity, political economy, development, heritage, locality, representation, imagination, commodification, and the global circulation of people, objects, ideas, images, and capital. The MA programme draws upon: the emerging body of theoretically sophisticated, ethnographically rich work involving tourism and travel; a thorough grounding in the history and contemporary theoretical trends of social-cultural anthropology; close engagement with noted and rising scholars in the field, via the programme's Colloquium Series in the Anthropology of Tourism and Travel, as well as opportunities for informal dialogue with visiting anthropologists and sociologists of tourism; other areas of expertise in the Department of Anthropology, including anthropology of development, migration and diaspora, museums and material culture, anthropology of food, global religious movements, anthropology of media, human rights, and anthropology of globalisation; the unparalleled concentration of area expertise among SOAS' academic staff, covering Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, together with their diasporas; the opportunity to engage with numerous other units at SOAS, such as the Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, the Food Studies Centre, and the Centre for Media Studies, among many others; and the vibrant intellectual and cultural life of the School, the University of London, and the city of London itself—a global tourist destination inviting study on a daily basis. Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Director of Studies, Dr Naomi Leite, at an early stage of their application in order to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study. Language Study Beginning in 2016-27, the MA programme will also be available as a 2- or 4-year (full- or part-time) MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism with Intensive Study of Arabic, Japanese, or Korean (other languages likely to be added). For information, contact Director of Studies Dr Naomi Leite. All SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are entitled to register for one language course for free through our Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). This course is additional to your regular syllabus and is not for credit. Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others are often offered. You must sign up before instruction begins and space fills quickly. Structure The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Travel and Tourism is designed to offer students a chance to pursue specialist interests via a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides: a broad-based MA programme for students with some background in issues of tourism/travel who wish to enhance their knowledge in light of contemporary anthropological research. a special-interest MA which will enable students to study topics involving tourism/travel in-depth, in relation to a specific theoretical approach or region. The programme consists of four units, comprised of a combination of full-year (1 unit) and half-year (.5 unit) courses. Core Courses: Anthropology of Travel and Tourism - 15PANC098 (1.0 unit). Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic approved by the Director of Studies and the candidate’s supervisor. Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1. This will not count towards the 4 unit total. Foundation Course: Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree. Option Courses: Students choose their remaining unit (or two units if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) from the Options course list. Contact the Director of Studies for a list of currently preapproved options. Popular options for the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism include Perspectives on Development, African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World, Anthropology of Globalisation, Issues in the Anthropology of Film, Issues in the Anthropology of Gender, and any of our courses on culture and society of different world regions. While these are common options, they are not required, and students are encouraged to locate courses both within and outside the department that speak to their interests. A language course taken for credit in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures may also be included. As each student's interests are unique, other relevant courses at SOAS may be selected under guidance from the Director of Studies and subject to approval. Courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected. Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses. Evening Colloquium Series: The programme also includes the biweekly Colloquium Series in the Anthropology of Tourism and Travel, with visiting speakers -- noted and rising scholars in the anthropology and sociology of tourism, many of them coming from outside the UK -- who present their current research and discuss it at length with the group. Language Entitlement Programme: Many students choose to pursue language study through the SOAS Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered. Programme Detail Compulsory Elements: Anthropology of Travel and Tourism - 15PANC098 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Foundation Course: Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Option Courses: Department of Anthropology African and Asian Cultures in Britain - 15PANH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropological approaches to agriculture, food and nutrition - 15PANH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology of Globalisation (PG) - 15PANH061 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology of Human Rights (PG) - 15PANH058 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Anthropology of Law - 15PANH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Anthropology of Urban Space, Place and Architecture - 15PANH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Comparative Media Theory - 15PANH028 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Directed Practical Study in the Anthropology of Tourism - 15PANH060 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Ethnographic Research Methods - 15PANH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in Mind, Culture and Psychiatry - 15PANH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in the Anthropology of Film - 15PANH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in the Anthropology of Gender - 15PANH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Media Production Skills - 15PANH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Perspectives On Development - 15PANH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Therapy and Culture - 15PANH027 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Courses in other departments A wide range of courses can be approved for the degree on a case-by-case basis. All students should meet with the programme convenor before selecting courses. Language Study Students may choose to study any language offered at SOAS that is normally available to students taking one of the taught masters programs. Teaching & Learning The learning environments making up the MA programme in Anthropology of Travel and Tourism run the gamut from lecture halls to intimate seminar rooms, suiting a wide range of learning styles. Study a language; take a course (or two) in anthropology of human rights, development, globalisation, religion, or gender, among many others; choose a course in another department that catches your interest and contributes to your dissertation plans, from world music to development studies. The academic staff in the Department of Anthropology are dynamic, experienced teachers who are widely recognised for their expertise and enjoy working directly with students. Renowned scholars from other institutions also come to share their knowledge: nearly every day of the week, the SOAS Anthropology Department has a public lecture series running, including series in the general Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Food, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and, of course, Anthropology of Tourism and Travel. In addition to these formal settings for learning, our students also learn from one another. Hailing from around the globe and bringing diverse life experiences to bear on their studies, all MA students in the Department of Anthropology can take courses together, making it a rich environment for intellectual exchange. Students also benefit from campus-wide programmes, clubs, study groups, and performances. Many students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism opt for hands-on learning via the half-unit Directed Practical Study in Anthropology of Tourism course, with placements in leading UK-based NGOs like Equality in Tourism and Tourism Concern, among others, as well as in private tour operator firms, providing background material for future research. While students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism may take a language course for credit, all SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are also entitled to register for non-credit free courses in a single language through the Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered. Pre Entry Reading All incoming students will be expected to have read at least two of the following. These are paperbacks written for newcomers to the discipline, widely available used online and relatively affordable to purchase new. Introducing anthropology: *Erikson, Thomas Hylland. What is Anthropology? Pluto Press, 2004. *Hendry, Joy and Simon Underdown. Anthropology: A Beginner's Guide. Oneworld, 2012. *Erikson, Thomas Hylland. Small Places, Large Issues: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology, 4th ed. Pluto Press, 2015. (*3rd edition also ok) *Hendry, Joy. An Introduction to Social Anthropology: Sharing Our Worlds. Palgrave, 2008. Further readings in anthropological theory and method: *Agar, Michael. The Professional Stranger: An Informal Introduction to Ethnography, 2nd ed. Emerald Group Publishing, 2008. *Gay y Blasco, Paloma and Huon Wardle. How to Read Ethnography. Routledge, 2006. *Rapport, Nigel and Joanna Overing. Social and Cultural Anthropology: The Key Concepts, 3rd ed. Routledge, 2015. (*2nd edition also ok) A Student's Perspective "This approach to teaching in the Department, in which theory is balanced with real life examples often results in passionate and thought provoking debates. If you miss a class, you miss out on an experience." Sabah Choudhry [-]

MA Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  August 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA provides advanced training in the field of Language Pedagogy with a specialization in Chinese, Japanese, Korean or Tibetan. The programme provides an appreciation of the concepts, modes of analysis and theoretical approaches in the area of Language Pedagogy, including second language learning theories and teaching methodologies. [+]

MA Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy Duration: One calendar year (full-time), two or three years (part-time daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second or equivalent in a BA in a relevant discipline (linguistics or applied linguistics), or a BA in other disciplines including some relevant units, and some relevant professional qualification (e.g. teacher training qualifications) or exceptional and documented experience in language teaching. Native or native-like proficiency in the language of the chosen path. Start of programme: From 2016/17 this programme will be replaced by the following programmes: New programmes from 2016 onwards: MA Arabic Language Learning and Teaching MA Chinese Language Learning and Teaching MA Japanese Language Learning and Teaching MA Korean Language Learning and Teaching (from 2017/18) The MA provides advanced training in the field of Language Pedagogy with a specialization in Chinese, Japanese, Korean or Tibetan. The programme provides an appreciation of the concepts, modes of analysis and theoretical approaches in the area of Language Pedagogy, including second language learning theories and teaching methodologies. Students will also be familiarised with the general areas of linguistic inquiry (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and discourse structure) and how they are relevant to the study of second language acquisition. As a practical component, students will also become familiar with the intent and design of instructional material and teaching/testing techniques, and will evaluate second language learners’ performance through the analysis of empirical data and adequate descriptive terminology; they will also be able to design appropriate lesson plans, and will have carried out a certain amount of practice in the language of their chosen pathway. Graduates will be qualified and well prepared for such professions as teaching the target language in higher education in the UK or in other countries, North America, and other parts of the world, teaching the target language at private institutions or at company, administrative or consultative staff at educational organizations, and editing staff at publishers related to language teaching. Structure The MA Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is currently formulated with four different pathways; specialising in Chinese, Japanese, Korean or Tibetan. Compulsory Core Unit Core courses must be passed to gain the degree Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC015 (1 Unit) - Full Year Choose one core unit from the following As determined by your language pathway. NB:Korean Linguistics and Language Pedagogy and Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism must be taken together to gain a full unit. Chinese Language Learning and Teaching - 15PCHC019 (1 Unit) - Full Year Japanese Language Learning and Teaching - 15PEAC024 (1 Unit) - Full Year Tibetan Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIH039 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism - 15PLIH038 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Korean Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIH037 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 For students with a background in Linguistics Entering students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics take the equivalent of one full unit of option courses from the list below or from any linguistics course approved by the programme convenor. Introduction to the Study of Language - 15PLIC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Topics in the History and Structure of the Korean Language - 15PEAC060 (1 Unit) - Full Year Syntactic Structure of Japanese 1 - 15PEAH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Second Language Acquisition in Japanese - 15PJKH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Topics in the Structure of Chinese (Masters) - 15PLIH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Language, Society and Communication (Masters) - 15PLIH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 For students with NO background in Linguistics The following course is compulsory. Introduction to the Study of Language - 15PLIC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation All students on the MA Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy must complete a 10,000 word Dissertation which counts for 25% of the overall degree. Dissertation in Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC989 (1 Unit) - Full Year Destinations An MA in Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy from SOAS equips students with essential skills such as competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers. MA Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy graduates leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. A Student's Perspective "I enjoy the student atmosphere here. The Students’ Union bar and café is cozy and friendly and I’ve enjoyed getting involved in the knitting for peace club. Also I have been impressed by the array of specialists in the department of Linguistics." Birgul Yilmmaz [-]

MA Arabic Language Learning and Teaching

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

If you are seeking an advanced level of specialised training that will set you on course for a career related to Arabic language learning or teaching in higher education, research, publishing or consultation, this programme offers a firm grounding in the theory and practice of language learning and teaching, as well as in linguistic research methods. [+]

MA Arabic Language Learning and Teaching Duration: One year full time, or two or three years part-time (daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second-class or equivalent in a BA in a relevant discipline (Linguistics or Applied Linguistics), or a BA in another discipline including some relevant units, or relevant professional qualifications (for example, a diploma-level teaching qualifications or exceptional and documented experience in language teaching). A BA in non-Linguistics discipline can be compensated by relevant units in (applied) linguistics study units OR a diploma-level teaching qualification (like SOAS Language Centre's PG Diploma in Teaching Arabic) but an applicant does not have to have both. Native or native-like proficiency in Arabic is required. Interview Policy: Candidates with ‘non-standard’ qualifications usually invited Venue: Russell Square: College Buildings Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? If you are seeking an advanced level of specialised training that will set you on course for a career related to Arabic language learning or teaching in higher education, research, publishing or consultation, this programme offers a firm grounding in the theory and practice of language learning and teaching, as well as in linguistic research methods. You will study both the general areas of linguistic inquiry and Arabic linguistics. This programme will also allow you to explore the relationship between linguistics and second language acquisition, and how this relationship supports Arabic language teaching, specifically in higher education. Structure Core Modules You must take all of the core modules listed below including: 15PLCH013: Teaching Communicative Arabic Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC015 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arabic Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Dissertation in Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC989 (1 Unit) - Full Year Compulsory Module Compulsory module for students with no background of general linguistics. Introduction to the Study of Language - 15PLIC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Optional Modules If you are not taking the compulsory module for students with no linguistics background, you must take module/s to the value of 1 unit from the courses below and/or from the list of running Linguistics PG modules. Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism - 15PLIH038 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Language, Society and Communication (Masters) - 15PLIH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 A Student's Perspective "Studying at SOAS is an absolute joy as well as an enriching experience. I am being taught by two of the most inspirational teachers I have ever met and they challenge me to ‘unpack’ and think more deeply about the issues that I am enthusiastic about." Bobby Danial [-]

MA Arabic Literature

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This new taught-Masters degree offers a deep insight into the Arab world through its literatures. It is an advanced programme designed for students with a good first degree in Arabic or with a good university degree who also know Arabic. [+]

MA Arabic Literature Duration: One calendar year (full-time), or two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: First or upper second-class honours degree or overseas equivalent in Arabic or another relevant subject with good knowledge of Arabic Interview Policy: Interviews by arrangement Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This new taught-Masters degree offers a deep insight into the Arab world through its literatures. It is an advanced programme designed for students with a good first degree in Arabic or with a good university degree who also know Arabic. The fundamental objective is to make Arabic culture and literature accessible to a wider body of postgraduate students and to provide them with training in the study of literature. Students develop an advanced understanding of Arabic literature and gain detailed knowledge of its past and present. The syllabus combines the literary approaches of comparative literature with in-depth study of Arabic literature. Students have the opportunity to become familiar with, among other things, literary theory, translation techniques, the sociology of literature, the social and political dimensions of modern Arabic literature, and different genres and themes of classical, medieval and modern Arabic literature. Structure Students take modules to the value of three units from the lists of options below, and write a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic. Options List Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Social and Political Dimensions of Modern Arabic Literature - 15PNMC347 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Arabic Women's Writing: Theories and Practices - 15PNMC411 (1 Unit) - Full Year Early and Medieval Arabic Linguistic Thought: Scholarship and Literature - 15PNMC410 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 A Modern Arabic Literary Genre: Themes and Techniques - 15PNMC046 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Arabic Poetry and Criticism - 15PNMC048 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Arabic Popular Literature: Themes, Genres & Theory - 15PNMC045 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Palestinian Literature (PG) - 15PNMC379 (1 Unit) - Full Year Classical Arabic Prose Literature and Adab - 15PNMC047 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Reading Classical Arabic Historians: Themes and Trends in Islamic Historiography - 15PNMC378 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arabic Critical Theory and Thought - 15PNMC403 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture, Society and Politics in Classical Arabic Literature - 15PNMC426 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning All courses are taught in English, and essays and presentations are also done in English. All courses apart from "Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature" involve reading some original Arabic texts. Most courses are taught in seminar groups. These demand active participation by students, e.g. by giving presentations and by discussion with other students in the class, in order to develop research potential, original thinking and, by the tutor's direction, structured knowledge of the topic. Classes are one two-hour session each week; in some cases an additional tutorial hour is added. In addition students are encouraged to attend lectures and seminars organised by the AHRB Centre for Asian and African Literature and the London Middle East Institute. Destinations A postgraduate degree in MA Arabic Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous aesthetics of the region and contemporary literary theories. Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face. Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. Graduates can use their skills in Arabic and literary study in a variety of occupations, particularly those in which deep knowledge of Arabic intellectual culture and a trained mind are an advantage. A Student's Perspective "Before I came to SOAS, I knew that my grade would depend on either one or two large assignments and I was apprehensive about that—almost scared, however I am glad as I got to learn a lot about myself as a student. I became more independent academically and got to see what I can really accomplished without teachers “coddling” me along the way. Extremely refreshing!" Tamara Bah, American University, Washington [-]

MA Arts of Asia and Africa

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 United Kingdom London

This programme draws upon the strength of the School of Arts as a centre for the study of the art, music and media of Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and their global diasporas. Students select courses from across the school, developing a cross-discipline understanding of the arts, broadly conceived. They have the option of specialising in a particular interdisciplinary field, such as popular music and film in the Middle East; art, archaeology and music of the Silk Road; or music, media and development in Africa. [+]

This programme draws upon the strength of the School of Arts as a centre for the study of the art, music and media of Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and their global diasporas. Students select courses from across the school, developing a cross-discipline understanding of the arts, broadly conceived. They have the option of specialising in a particular interdisciplinary field, such as popular music and film in the Middle East; art, archaeology and music of the Silk Road; or music, media and development in Africa. The School of Arts is a unique concentration of experts in the art, music and media of the non-Western world, unsurpassed in scale and reach by any other institution worldwide. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff whose work combines disciplinary rigour and innovative interdisciplinary exchange. Teaching is consistently informed by and contributes to the research of members of staff. Students can select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of Asia and Africa. The MA Arts of Asia and Africa provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology, Music and/or Media of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including employment in museums, galleries and the creative and cultural industries. The transferable skills that they acquire enable them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. The programme is also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research. For further information about duration, fees, requirements and other information, please visit SOAS website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/soasoas/degree-programmes/ma-arts-of-asia-and-africa/ [-]

MA Buddhist Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA Buddhist Studies suits students with different academic backgrounds and prospective personal objectives, from those interested in broadening their knowledge of Buddhism as a whole or of specific Buddhist traditions to those intending to embark on language-based research or fieldwork among Buddhist communities. [+]

MA Buddhist Studies Duration: Full time: 1 calendar year Part time: 2 or 3 calendar years. We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? The MA Buddhist Studies suits students with different academic backgrounds and prospective personal objectives, from those interested in broadening their knowledge of Buddhism as a whole or of specific Buddhist traditions to those intending to embark on language-based research or fieldwork among Buddhist communities. It typically suits: students planning to pursue further research in Buddhist Studies, which may involve at a subsequent stage the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education. students willing to pursue a career or professional activity, for which advanced knowledge of Buddhism as a global cultural force is essential. students who wish to pursue the academic study of religions as a complement to their personal experience and commitments. students from traditionally Buddhist countries, willing to broaden their knowledge of Buddhism as a global religion, and to be introduced to an academic approach that is characterised both by its critical distance and by its empathy. Structure The structure of MA Buddhist Studies provides a unique study pathway, characterised both by its coherence and by its flexibility. The core course, “Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies” (0.5 Unit), co-taught by four staff whose expertise cover most of Buddhist Asia, provides students with a broad and stimulating journey into key notions and methods in the study of Buddhism. Students will moreover have to submit a Dissertation in Buddhist Studies of 10,000 words, on a topic chosen from the course chosen as major. The remaining 2.5 Units may be chosen in the large pool of courses on Buddhist topics and languages, thus allowing each student to build up a specialized knowledge of one or more areas of Buddhist Asia. Students are allowed to take courses taught outside the department of the Study of Religions up to one unit, which may or may not include a language. Core Courses Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies - 15PSRH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Dissertation in Buddhist Studies - 15PSRC990 (1 Unit) - Full Year Units available as Major Buddhism in Tibet - 15PSRH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Buddhist Meditation in India and Tibet - 15PSRC172 (1 Unit) - Full Year Chinese Religious Texts: A Reading Seminar - 15PSRH038 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-modern Period - (0.5 Unit) East Asian Buddhist Thought - 15PSRH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Features of Buddhist Monasticism - 15PSRH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 History and Doctrines of Indian Buddhism - 15PSRC059 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Imag(in)ing Buddhahood in South Asia (1) - 15PARH078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Imag(in)ing Buddhahood in South Asia (2) - 15PSRH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Oriental religions in European academia and imagination, 1815-1945 - 15PSRC168 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Religious Practice in Japan: Texts, Rituals and Believers - 15PSRC071 (1 Unit) - Full Year The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia - 15PSRH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Other courses available within the Study of Religions Department Basic Pali (PG) - 15PSRC176 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Jainism: History, Doctrine and the Contemporary World - 15PSRC024 (1 Unit) - Full Year Pali: Intermediate Level - 15PSRC053 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 The Great Tradition of Taoism - 15PSRH036 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Origins and Development of Yoga in Ancient India - 15PSRC173 (1 Unit) - Full Year Relevant language courses available in other Departments Advanced Japanese: Contemporary Topics (PG) - 15PJKC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Basic Japanese 1 (PG) - 15PJKC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Basic Japanese 2 (PG) - 15PJKC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Burmese Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC039 (1 Unit) - Full Year Burmese Language 2 (Postgraduate) - 15PSEC045 (1 Unit Unit) Elementary Korean (PG) - 15PJKC015 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Intermediate Korean (PG) - 15PJKC013 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intensive Elementary Tibetan (PG) - 15PCHC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Intermediate Japanese 1 (PG) - 15PJKC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intermediate Japanese 2 (PG) - 15PJKC011 (1 Unit) - Full Year Korean Advanced (Masters) - 15PEAC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year Nepali Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC298 (1 Unit) - Full Year Nepali Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC299 (1 Unit) - Full Year Prakrit Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC309 (1 Unit) - Full Year Readings in Pre-Modern Japanese Literature (Masters) - 15PJKC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year Sanskrit Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC294 (1 Unit) - Full Year Sanskrit Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC306 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 1 (PG) - 15PCHC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 2 (PG) - 15PCHC011 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 3 (PG) - 15PCHC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 4 (PG) - 15PCHC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese: Reading Classical and Literary Chinese (PG) - 15PCHC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year Thai Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC040 (1 Unit) - Full Year Thai Language 2 (PG) - 15PSEC041 (1 Unit) - Full Year Thai Language 3 (PG) - 15PSEC042 (1 Unit) - Full Year Vietnamese Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC036 (1 Unit) - Full Year Vietnamese Language 2 (PG) - 15PSEC037 (1 Unit) - Full Year Relevant courses available in the Department of History of Art and Archaeology Art and Archaeology of the Silk Road - 15PARC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route - 15PARH057 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Critical Themes in Tibetan Art - 15PARH074 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea - 15PARH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 The Indian Temple - 15PARC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context - 15PARH075 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Relevant courses available in the Department of Music Aspects of Music and Religion in South East Asia - 15PMUH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 A Student's Perspective "From Indian Buddhism to Japanese Esoteric Buddhism, the diversity of the courses perfectly fitted my interests in Buddhism. " Qingniao Li [-]

MA Chinese Language Learning and Teaching

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

If you are pursuing intensive research-related and practice-related training for a career in Chinese language learning or teaching, this programme offers a firm grounding in theory and practice of language learning and teaching; as well as in research methods. [+]

MA Chinese Language Learning and Teaching Duration: One calendar year full-time. Two or three years part-time, daytime only Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second-class or equivalent in a BA in a relevant discipline (Linguistics or Applied Linguistics), or a BA in another discipline including some relevant units, or relevant professional qualifications (for example, a diploma-level teaching qualifications or exceptional and documented experience in language teaching). A BA in non-Linguistics discipline can be compensated by relevant units in (applied) linguistics study units OR a diploma-level teaching qualification (like SOAS Language Centre's PG Diploma in Teaching Chinese) but an applicant does not have to have both. Native or native-like proficiency in Chinese is required. Venue: Russell Square: College Buildings Start of programme: September Intake Only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time If you are pursuing intensive research-related and practice-related training for a career in Chinese language learning or teaching, this programme offers a firm grounding in theory and practice of language learning and teaching; as well as in research methods. You will study general areas of linguistic inquiry (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and discourse structure, if you have not previously studied linguistics). You will also study how linguistic inquiry informs second language acquisition and language teaching. You will also learn about teaching Chinese in higher education. By the end of the degree, you will be fully adept at evaluating published materials (e.g. textbooks) and research papers related to Chinese language teaching, conducting pedagogical research, in addition to designing teaching materials and lesson plans. Structure Students take core modules up to the value of three full units plus a 10,000-word dissertation. This includes two core compulsory modules, Language Pedagogy and Chinese Language Learning and Teaching. For those who have not previously studied linguistics an introductory module, Introduction to the Study of Language (ISL), is required. The remaining units can be taken from the list of optional modules. Core Modules You must take all of the core modules listed below Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC015 (1 Unit) - Full Year Chinese Language Learning and Teaching - 15PCHC019 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC989 (1 Unit) - Full Year Compulsory Module Compulsory module for students with no background of general linguistics. Introduction to the Study of Language - 15PLIC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Optional Modules If you are not taking the compulsory module for students with no linguistics background, you must take module/s to the value of 1 unit from the list below or other linguistics course(s) approved by the programme convenor. Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism - 15PLIH038 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Topics in the Structure of Chinese (Masters) - 15PLIH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Language, Society and Communication (Masters) - 15PLIH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 A Student's Perspective "It is a quirky university making it stand out from all the rest, being extremely culturally diverse and welcoming towards students from all backgrounds." Emma Young [-]

MA Chinese Literature

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme enables students to engage critically with the varied aspects of Chinese literature. This new degree covers both pre-modern and modern literatures of China. It includes the study of literary works written in the original languages, as well as an introduction to literary theory. [+]

MA Chinese Literature Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Incoming students will be expected to have completed at least the equivalent of two years of undergraduate Chinese language study. Start of programme: September intake only This programme enables students to engage critically with the varied aspects of Chinese literature. This new degree covers both pre-modern and modern literatures of China. It includes the study of literary works written in the original languages, as well as an introduction to literary theory. The programme comprises two compulsory courses, a minor option, and a dissertation. Structure The MA degree consists of four components: Not all courses may be available every year. 1. Core Course Take one of these courses Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year 2. Compulsory Course Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year 3. Minor Courses For non-fluent Chinese speakers Students who do not have advanced or native-speaker competence in Chinese are required to select one of the following two courses, which offer advanced training in reading and translating Chinese literary texts. These courses are also taken by fourth-year undergraduate students, but MA students will be required to do additional work. Traditional Chinese Language and Literature - 15PCHC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Modern Chinese Literature (MA) - 15PCHC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year For fluent Chinese speakers For students with advanced or native speaker competence in Chinese, alternative minor units may be selected from the MA Sinology programme, or the second core course may be selected as a minor, with approval from the programme convenor. 4. Dissertation A 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic Teaching & Learning The degree programme consists of two compulsory courses, a minor option and a dissertation of 10,000 words. The taught part of the course consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and the additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Chinese Literature from SOAS equips students with essential skills such as competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through the indepth study of Chinese Literature, both pre-modern and modern and the study of literary theory in relation to this literature. Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. A Student's Perspective "You might not be able to find a department dedicated to your major... However, because SOAS has many courses that are interdisciplinary, you also might be able to find courses of your interests. For example, for SOAS does not have a dedicated philosophy department, I, a philosophy major, looked for courses in other departments that cover philosophical discourses. My experience here of studying Buddhism and Taoism was highly inspiring." Dong-Kyung Lee, Korea University [-]

MA Chinese Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA Chinese Studies provides an exceptional opportunity to take advantage of the wide range of disciplinary approaches to the study of Chinese societies available at SOAS.The main emphasis is on modern and contemporary China, although it is also possible to study aspects of pre-Modern China.In addition to the courses on offer, students develop their own particular area of specialisation by writing a dissertation in their major discipline. [+]

MA Chinese Studies Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? Students who take this degree come from many countries and have a wide variety of academic backgrounds. While some wish to broaden their previous studies or experience of China, others approach the course without having a Chinese element to their first degree, but with a desire to focus their previous training on the region. The MA Chinese Studies provides an exceptional opportunity to take advantage of the wide range of disciplinary approaches to the study of Chinese societies available at SOAS.The main emphasis is on modern and contemporary China, although it is also possible to study aspects of pre-Modern China.In addition to the courses on offer, students develop their own particular area of specialisation by writing a dissertation in their major discipline. When applying, applicants are asked to specify their preferred major subject, and asked to give an alternative as practical considerations such as time tabling and availability of courses may limit freedom of choice. Once enrolled, students have two weeks to finalise their choice of subjects and have the opportunity of sampling a variety of subjects through attending lectures etc. Structure Students take three taught courses, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major. As the emphasis in the Regional Studies programmes is on interdisciplinary study, students are required either to select their three courses from three different disciplines OR two minor courses from the same discipline and the major from a different one. China and Inner Asia Modern Film from Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora - 15PCHH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern Chinese Literature (MA) - 15PCHC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Traditional Chinese Language and Literature - 15PCHC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Available as a minor only Modern Documentary Texts - 15PEAC007 (1 Unit) - Full Year Taiwan Studies Culture and Society of Taiwan - 15PCHH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Language (minor only) Only one language course may be taken. Special Course in Chinese 1 (PG) - 15PCHC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 2 (PG) - 15PCHC011 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 3 (PG) - 15PCHC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 4 (PG) - 15PCHC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese: Reading Classical and Literary Chinese (PG) - 15PCHC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year Advanced Chinese for Business - 15PCHH027 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Elementary spoken Hokkien (Minnanyu, Taiwanese) (PG) - 15PCHC007 (1 Unit) - Full Year Practical Translation: Chinese to English - 15PCHH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Practical Translation: English to Chinese - 15PCHH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Intensive Elementary Tibetan (PG) - 15PCHC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Styles of Modern Chinese Literary Language - 15PCHC016 (1 Unit) - Full Year Art and Archaeology Art and Archaeology of the Silk Road - 15PARC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Available as a minor only Ceramics in Chinese Culture: 10th - 18th Centuries - 15PARH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Anthropology and Sociology (minor only) Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Media and Film Studies Japanese Transnational Cinema: From Kurosawa to Asia Extreme and Studio Ghibli - 15PJKH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Development Studies Economics Economic problems and policies in modern China - 15PECC035 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region - 15PECC334 (1 Unit) - Full Year Politics and International Studies Taiwan's politics and cross-strait relations - 15PPOC252 (1 Unit) - Full Year State and society in the Chinese political process - 15PPOC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year China and international politics - 15PPOC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year International politics of East Asia - 15PPOC251 (1 Unit) - Full Year Available as a minor only Northeast Asian politics: Japan, Korea and Taiwan - 15PPOC253 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 ( Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Music Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Religion Colonial and Christian Missions in Africa: Readings from the Archives - 15PSRH043 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 East Asian Buddhist Thought - 15PSRH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The Great Tradition of Taoism - 15PSRH036 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Chinese Religious Texts: A Reading Seminar - 15PSRH038 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 History Knowledge and Power in Early Modern China - 15PHIH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Asian Wars : World War II and the End of Empire, 1942-1960 - 15 PHI H038 (0.5 unit Unit) Nationhood and Competing Identities in Modern China - 15PHIH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Teaching & Learning Students are exposed to a wide range of topics through participation in the seminars, general lectures and specialised workshops organised by the Centre of Chinese Studies. Lectures and Seminars The style of teaching in the Chinese Studies programme varies according to subject and teacher, but in most courses there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take. Dissertation The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations A postgraduate degree in China and Inner Asia studies from SOAS equips students with essential skills such as competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Africa-Asia Confidential Asia Society BBC China Central Academy of Fine Arts Citibank CSR Asia CTBI China Desk Deloitte UKEMP Foreign and Commonwealth Office, UK French Embassy in China Fu Xin Contemporary Art Gallery Government Offices of Sweden Inter Committee of the Red cross ICRC KPMG LLP UK Linklaters LLP Macmillan Cancer Support Overseas Development Institute Shelter UK The Amity Foundation Hong Kong Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Editor Chartered Accountant Global Learning Program Associate News Editor Researcher China Industry Specialist Lecturer Artistic Director Foreign English Expert Diploma Policy Officer Environment/Climate Change English Teacher Translator Internal Auditor Consultant/Account Manager Expert on Media-Chinese language Interpreter Lecturer in Modern Chinese Culture and Language Professional Speaker & Director Assistant Professor A Student's Perspective "With some of the West’s leading experts on Taiwan’s political economy, SOAS was the ideal place for me to study cross-Strait relations" Daniel Mojahedi [-]

MA Comparative Literature (Africa / Asia)

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This expertise is available to students interested in studying these literatures through English - including both original English language literatures of Africa and Asia and literature written in African and Asian languages presented through English translations. [+]

MA Comparative Literature (Africa / Asia) Duration: One calendar year (full-time). Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time The opportunity to move from the familiar Euro-American literary canons into the fresh but less well known worlds of African and Asian literature is what attracts most students to this popular MA. At SOAS, students benefit from the unique expertise in this vast field possessed by the school’s faculty. This expertise is available to students interested in studying these literatures through English - including both original English language literatures of Africa and Asia and literature written in African and Asian languages presented through English translations. While exploring new horizons and breaking out of the Euro-centric space in which comparative literature has developed so far, the course covers the major theoretical contributions made by Western scholars. In doing so, it constructs a unique multi-cultural domain for the study of literature and its location in culture and society. A prior knowledge of an African or Asian language is not a requirement for admission to this degree. Structure All students are required to take the core course in their first year. Two other courses, one major, one minor, plus a dissertation of 10,000 words must also be completed. Core Module Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year English Based Options Arabic Women's Writing: Theories and Practices - 15PNMC411 (1 Unit) - Full Year Years of Radical change: South Korean cinema from the 'New Wave' to the new millenium - 15PJKH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Traditional Drama (Masters) - 15PEAH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Japanese Literature (Masters) - 15PEAH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Film from Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora - 15PCHH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Literatures in African languages - 15PAFC124 (1 Unit) - Full Year Travelling Africa: Writing the Cape to Cairo - 15PAFC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Realism and Magical Realism in the Afrophone Novel (PG) - 15PAFC146 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Literary Traditions and Culture of Korea (Masters) - 15PJKH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Trajectories of Modernity in 20th Century Korean Literature (Masters) - 15PJKH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Literatures of South Asia - 15PSAC284 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 English Literatures of South East Asia - 15PSEH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Postcolonial Theory and Practice - 15PCSC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year Post-crisis Thai Cinema (1997-2007) - 15PSEH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Under Western Eyes: European Writings on South East Asia (PG) - 15PSEH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 War, Revolution and Independence in South East Asia Literatures in Translation (Masters) - 15PSEH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Modern Arabic Literature and the West - 15PNMC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Culture, Society and Politics in Classical Arabic Literature - 15PNMC426 (1 Unit) - Full Year Japanese Transnational Cinema: From Kurosawa to Asia Extreme and Studio Ghibli - 15PJKH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Indian Cinema: Its History and Social Context - 15PSAH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Indian Cinema: Key Issues - 15PSAH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Research Methods In Translation Studies - 15PLIH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Translating Cultures - 15PJKC029 (1 Unit) - Full Year Turkey:Continuity and Change - 15PNMC377 (1 Unit) - Full Year Language Based Options: Readings in Korean Literature (Masters) - 15PJKC016 (1 Unit) - Full Year Social and Political Trends in 19th Century Turkish Literature - 15PNMC373 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Selected Topics in 20th Century Turkish Literature - 15PNMC374 (1 Unit) - Full Year Social and Political Dimensions of Modern Arabic Literature - 15PNMC347 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Modern Palestinian Literature (PG) - 15PNMC379 (1 Unit) - Full Year Sanskrit Literature - 15PSAC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Directed Readings in the Literature of a Modern South Asian Language - 15PSAC016 (1 Unit) - Full Year Directed Readings in a South East Asian Language - 15PSEH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Literature & Colonialism in North India - 155901295 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Narratives of Mobility in Contemporary Hindi Literature (Masters) - 15PSAH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Identity and Language in Hebrew Literature - 15PNMC412 (1 Unit) - Full Year Year abroad No Teaching & Learning The taught part of the programme consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take. A 10,000-word dissertation written over the summer offers students the opportunity to develop original research in an area of special interest. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Comparative Literature (Africa/Asia) provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the selected region will have been developed through a combination of the study of it's literature and exploration of contemporary literary theories. Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face. Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. A Student's Perspective "This course has challenged me to question my preconceived notions of binaries and absolutes, allowing me to develop a more nuanced interpretation of different literary traditions" Sheena Yingling Kang [-]

MA Contemporary Art and Art Theory of Asia and Africa

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

On this programme students engage with some of the most dynamic and contemporary aspects of Asian and African art, as well as issues of collection, display, representation, tourist art, and shifts between regional, national and global identities. By focusing on theoretical and methodological questions, they are equipped with the terms and approaches needed for in-depth study of contemporary art. This is combined with the study of contemporary art from a range of Asian and African contexts. [+]

MA Contemporary Art and Art Theory of Asia and Africa Duration: One year (full-time). Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: The normal qualification for admission to the MA programme is an upper second class honours degree. Other qualifications, however, may be acceptable and the Department welcomes mature students. Students taking the MA degree may or may not have previous experience of our subjects. While knowledge of a relevant Asian or African language is not a requirement, for some courses it is an advantage for admission (see individual course descriptions for details). It is possible to include an element of language training within the MA programme by taking an Asian or African language as one of the two ‘minor’ courses. This option may be particularly desirable for those intending to progress to the PhD, who do not already have the necessary language skills. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time On this programme students engage with some of the most dynamic and contemporary aspects of Asian and African art, as well as issues of collection, display, representation, tourist art, and shifts between regional, national and global identities. By focusing on theoretical and methodological questions, they are equipped with the terms and approaches needed for in-depth study of contemporary art. This is combined with the study of contemporary art from a range of Asian and African contexts. The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in contemporary Asian and African art, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as contemporary global Media, Film and Music. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in, for example, the film, cinema, languages and modern history of Asia and Africa. A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research. Structure Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department related to Contemporary Art and Art Theory listed below. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from the other MA modules in the department or from MA options offered by other SOAS departments, also listed below. Students must complete the Dissertation in History of Art and Archaeology: Contemporary Art and Art Theory of Asia and Africa (15PARC995). Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught modules in the first year, and one taught module and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught module in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it. Dissertation in History of Art and Archaeology: Contemporary Art and Art Theory of Asia and Africa - 15PARC995 (1 Unit) - Full Year History of Art and Archaeology - Contemporary Art and Art Theory Options Approaches to Critical Interpretation & Aesthetic Theories - 15PARC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arts and Society in sub-Saharan Africa - 15PARH052 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Arts of Modern and Contemporary China (since 1800) - 15PARH055 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Contemporary Art and the Global - 15PARH085 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Diaspora Contexts and Visual Culture - 15PARH042 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Issues in Contemporary Southeast Asian Art - 15PARH083 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern and Contemporary Arts in Africa - 15PARH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern and Contemporary Korean Art - 15PARH060 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Museums, Anthropology and the Arts of Asia and Africa - 15PARH072 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Photography and the Image in Africa - 15PARH082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Representing Conflict: A Cross-Cultural and Inter Disciplinary Approach - 15PARH039 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Other Options in the History of Art and Archaeology Arab Painting - 15PARH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Architectural Boundaries and the Body - 15PARH063 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Art and Architecture of the Early Ottomans and the Beyliks (13-15th centuries) - 15PARH068 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Art and Architecture of the Fatimids - 15PARH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Art and Archaeology of the Silk Road - 15PARC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arts of Koryo and Chosen Korea - 15PARH059 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Arts of the Tamil Temple - 15PARH067 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Arts of Modern and Contemporary China (since 1800) - 15PARH055 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route - 15PARH057 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Ceramics in Chinese Culture: 10th - 18th Centuries - 15PARH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Chinese Porcelain: Trade, Transfer and Reception - 15PARH064 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Critical Themes in Tibetan Art - 15PARH074 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Curating Cultures - 15PARH079 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 (En)gendering Southeast Asia: Aesthetics and Politics of Sexual Difference - 15PARH084 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia - 15PARH073 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Imag(in)ing Buddhahood in South Asia (1) - 15PARH078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islam and the West: Artistic and Cultural Contacts - 15PARH034 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic Art & Architecture of Medieval Anatolia and the South Caucasus (11-13th centuries) - 15PARH070 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Islamic Archaeology - 15PARH081 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic Art and Architecture of Eastern Mediterranean of the Period of the Crusades (11th-14th centuries) - 15PARH080 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Monuments and sculpture of Angkor - 15PARH071 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Morocco and the Horizons of Visibility - 15PARH065 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Painting and Visual Culture in China - 15PARC043 (1.0 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Persian Painting - 15PARH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Popular Practice in the Edo Period Arts - 15PARH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea - 15PARH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Shogunal Iconography in the Edo Period - 15PARH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History - 15PARH076 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Indian Temple - 15PARC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context - 15PARH075 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Visual Arts of Dynastic China (to 1800) - 15PARH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Options in Other Departments Anthropology Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) History Japanese Modernity I - 15PHIH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Modernity II - 15PHIH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Knowledge and Power in Early Modern China - 15PHIH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Nationhood and Competing Identities in Modern China - 15PHIH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Study of Religions Theory and Method in the Study of Religion - 15PSRC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Media Studies Communication, Culture and Politics in the Middle East: Theoretical and Analytical Approaches - 15PMSC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year Media Spectacle and Urban Space in East Asia - 15PMSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Mediated Culture in the Middle East: Politics and Communications - 15PMSH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Music Aspects of Music and Religion in South East Asia - 15PMUH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Atlantic Africa: (P)Layers of Mediation in African Popular Music (PG) - 15PMUC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Central Asian Music - 15PMUH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Music in Selected Regions of Africa: Contexts and Structures - 15PMUC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Music, Nation and Conflict in Jerusalem - 15PMUH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Music, Place and Politics in Cuba - 15PMUH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Popular and Fusion Music in South East Asia (PG) - 15PMUH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Raga: concept and practice (PG) - 15PMUH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Africa Afrophone Philosophies (PG) - 15PAFH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 African Philosophy (PG) - 15PAFH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Amharic 1 (PG) - 15PAFC130 (1 Unit) - Full Year The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Curating Africa: African Film and Video in the Age of Festivals - 15PAFH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Hausa 1 (PG) - 15PAFC136 (1 Unit) - Full Year Literatures in African languages - 15PAFC124 (1 Unit) - Full Year Somali 1 (PG) - 15PAFC132 (1 Unit) - Full Year Swahili 1 (PG) - 15PAFC140 (1 Unit) - Full Year Travelling Africa: Writing the Cape to Cairo - 15PAFC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Visual Cultures in South Africa: Past and Present - 15PAFC143 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Yoruba 1 (PG) - 15PAFC134 (1 Unit) - Full Year Zulu 1 (PG) - 15PAFC128 (1 Unit) - Full Year China and Asia Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Film from Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora - 15PCHH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Traditional Chinese Language and Literature - 15PCHC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Special Course in Chinese 1 (PG) - 15PCHC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 2 (PG) - 15PCHC011 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 3 (PG) - 15PCHC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 4 (PG) - 15PCHC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese: Reading Classical and Literary Chinese (PG) - 15PCHC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year Japan and Korea Basic Japanese 1 (PG) - 15PJKC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Basic Korean (PG) - 15PJKC022 (1 Unit) - Full Year Cinema, Nation and the Transcultural - 15PJKC023 (1 Unit) - Full Year Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Japanese Television since 1953 - 15PJKC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Japanese Transnational Cinema: From Kurosawa to Asia Extreme and Studio Ghibli - 15PJKH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Topics in Modern Korean History - 15PEAC059 (1 Unit) - Full Year Trajectories of Modernity in 20th Century Korean Literature (Masters) - 15PJKH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Near & Middle East Arabic 2 (PG) - 15PNMC382 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arabic 300 (Postgraduate) - 15PNMC390 (1 unit - 45 cats Unit) Arabic 4 (PG) - 15PNMC391 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arabic Poetry and Criticism - 15PNMC048 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Arabic Women's Writing: Theories and Practices - 15PNMC411 (1 Unit) - Full Year Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies I: History and Politics - 15PNMH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies II: Culture and Society - 15PNMH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Elementary Persian Texts (PG) - 15PNMC384 (1 Unit) - Full Year Elementary Written Persian - 15PNMC387 (1 Unit) - Full Year Elementary Written Turkish - 15PNMC386 (1 Unit) - Full Year Film and Society in the Middle East - 15PNMC230 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Intensive Turkish Language (PG) - 15PNMC395 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intermediate Standard Modern Arabic - 15PNMC407 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intermediate Modern Turkish Language (PG) - 15PNMC383 (1 Unit) - Full Year Introduction to Standard Modern Arabic - 15PNMC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Iran: History, Culture, Politics - 15PNMC405 (1 Unit) - Full Year Israel, the Arab World and the Palestinians - 15PNMC038 (1 Unit) - Full Year New Cinemas of Turkey - 15PNMH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Persian Language 2 (PG) - 15PNMC033 (1 Unit) - Full Year Persian Language 3 (PG) - 15PNMC408 (1 Unit) - Full Year South Asia Bengali Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC303 (1 Unit) - Full Year Bengali Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC304 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya - 15PSAC291 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hindi Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC295 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hindi Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC296 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hindi Language 3 (PG) - 15PSAC297 (1 Unit) - Full Year Imagining Pakistan: culture, politics, gender (MA) - 15PSAC313 (1 Unit) - Full Year Indian Cinema: Its History and Social Context - 15PSAH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Indian Cinema: Key Issues - 15PSAH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Literature & Colonialism in North India (Masters) - 15PSAH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Literatures of South Asia - 15PSAC284 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Modern Bengal: the Evolution of Bengali Culture and Society from 1690 to the Present Day (MA) - 15PSAC289 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Nepali Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC298 (1 Unit) - Full Year Nepali Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC299 (1 Unit) - Full Year Sanskrit Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC294 (1 Unit) - Full Year Sanskrit Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC306 (1 Unit) - Full Year The Politics of Culture in Contemporary South Asia - 15PSAC314 (1 Unit) - Full Year Urdu Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC300 (1 Unit) - Full Year Urdu Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC301 (1 Unit) - Full Year Southeast Asia Burmese Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC039 (1 Unit) - Full Year Burmese Language 2 (Postgraduate) - 15PSEC045 (1 Unit Unit) Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indonesian Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Indonesian Language 2 (PG) - 15PSEC033 (1 Unit) - Full Year Khmer (Cambodian) Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC043 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Thai Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC040 (1 Unit) - Full Year Thai Language 2 (PG) - 15PSEC041 (1 Unit) - Full Year Vietnamese Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC036 (1 Unit) - Full Year Vietnamese Language 2 (PG) - 15PSEC037 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning Teaching Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory. In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London. Assessment For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Asia House Bonhams British Museum Christie's Hong Kong Design Museum Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum Hong Kong Museum Of Art India Foundation For The Arts Museum of East Asian Art National Gallery National Museum of Singapore People Projects Culture & Change Schoeni Art Gallery Sotheby's Taiwan Embassy The Alliance for Global Education The British Embassy The Chester Beatty Library The National Museum Of Korea The Royal Collection Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Manager of Communications Culture Programme Coordinator Research Assistant Social Anthropology Lecturer Specialist - Indian Art Architect Art Historian Development Specialist Archivist Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager Creative Director Organisational Consultant Travel writer Art Collector Chinese Painting Specialist Professor of Silk Road History Rights and Reproductions Officer Public Education Coordinator Senior Curator of Photographs A Student's Perspective "I really wanted to study History of Art and I knew that was my calling. After research, I found out that SOAS was a prestigious school with notable alumni and also that I could study History of Art and Law as a joint degree, which is perhaps the only school in the world that offers this at the BA level." Guillaume Vandame [-]

MA Critical Media and Cultural Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This is the unique Masters-level programme offered that specifically addresses Critical Media and Cultural Studies of the non-Western world. The degree introduces students to the key contemporary issues discussed in Asian and African media and provides them with the opportunity to engage directly in research on an aspect of these media. It has a strong theoretical element, equipping students with the intellectual tools to consider the production, distribution and reception of non-Western media in new ways and to challenge the English-language, Eurocentric approach of most media studies scholarship. [+]

MA Critical Media and Cultural Studies Duration: 1 Year Full Time, 2 or 3 Years Part Time Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum - Upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This is the unique Masters-level programme offered that specifically addresses Critical Media and Cultural Studies of the non-Western world. The degree introduces students to the key contemporary issues discussed in Asian and African media and provides them with the opportunity to engage directly in research on an aspect of these media. It has a strong theoretical element, equipping students with the intellectual tools to consider the production, distribution and reception of non-Western media in new ways and to challenge the English-language, Eurocentric approach of most media studies scholarship. While media studies degrees usually concentrate on media production, distribution and reception in North America and Western Europe, this programme considers critical issues in media and cultural studies in their full global complexity, with a focus on the cultures and societies of Asia and Africa and their diasporas. The degree is distinctive in the depth of theoretical and cultural background to contemporary media processes that it provides. Optional courses offer a range of approaches to the critical study of Asian and African discourses, from cinema to music, comparative literature to language, gender, religion, art and archaeology. The programme is designed for students with an interest in critical theory; media professionals seeking alternative ways of understanding the media and culture industries; and those in NGOs and government organizations interested in challenging the hegemony of media corporations. It is well suited to students wishing to proceed to MPhil/PhD research in media or cultural studies, visual cultural studies, urban studies, sociology and anthropology. Structure Each student takes 4 units in total: the Compulsory Course (1 unit), the Dissertation (1 unit), two half units from list 3 and one unit of options of their choice. In choosing their courses, MA students are advised to pay careful attention to the balance of coursework across the two terms. In particular it is important to ensure that each term you have three taught courses. However much you might wish to take a mixture of courses that requires more coursework in one term than the other, it is most unwise to attempt to take four courses in one term and two in the other. Experience has shown that students simply cannot manage the load during the heavy term with the result that they either do very badly, fail or are unable to complete the courses in question. As a result Directors of Studies for the degrees and the Faculty staff will not approve a selection of courses which results in an imbalanced workload. An imbalance of courses between terms is only possible with the written permission of the convenor of the degree. 1. Compulsory Course Theoretical and Contemporary Issues in Media and Cultural Studies 2. Dissertation in Critical Media and Cultural Studies Dissertation in Media Studies (supervisor to be allocated according to the dissertation topic) 3. Courses in Media Studies Students are required to take TWO half unit courses from List 3. The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use - 15PMSH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Transnational Communities and Diasporic Media:Networking, Connectivity, Identity - 15PMSH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Media Spectacle and Urban Space in East Asia - 15PMSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Mediated Culture in the Middle East: Politics and Communications - 15PMSH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International Political Communication - 15PMSH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Qualitative Research Methods - 15PMSC033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Iranian media and film - 15PMSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Studies in Global Media and Post-National Communication - 15PMSH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Studies in Media, Information Communication Technologies and Development - 15PMSH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 4. Optional Courses: Students may take a course or courses to the value of one full unit from the following lists: Digital traditional broadcasting communication - 15PMSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Courses in Cinemas of Asia and Africa Japanese Transnational Cinema: From Kurosawa to Asia Extreme and Studio Ghibli - 15PJKH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Japanese Television since 1953 - 15PJKC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Media Spectacle and Urban Space in East Asia - 15PMSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Post-crisis Thai Cinema (1997-2007) - 15PSEH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 (Post) Colonialism and Otherness in South East Asia on Screen - 15PSEH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian Cinema: Its History and Social Context - 15PSAH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Indian Cinema: Key Issues - 15PSAH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Curating Africa: African Film and Video in the Age of Festivals - 15PAFH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern Film from Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora - 15PCHH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Issues in the Anthropology of Film - 15PANH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 One option from among the following courses in Comparative Literature and Gender Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Postcolonial Theory and Practice - 15PCSC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year Literatures in African languages - 15PAFC124 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Arabic Literature and the West - 15PNMC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Literatures of South Asia - 15PSAC284 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Popular and Fusion Music in South East Asia (PG) - 15PMUH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 One option from among the following courses in Music Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music in Selected Regions of Africa: Contexts and Structures - 15PMUC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 One Option from courses in Art & Archaeology and Anthropology Contemporary Art and the Global - 15PARH085 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Media Production Skills - 15PANH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Issues in Contemporary Southeast Asian Art - 15PARH083 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Photography and the Image in Africa - 15PARH082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 One Option from courses in the Study of Religions and Centre for Gender Studies Buddhist Arts in Context - 15PSRH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Christianity and Social Change in Sub Saharan Africa - 15PSRC157 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Critical Theory and the Study of Religions - 15PSRC037 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Jewishness on Screen - 15PSRH044 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Theory and Method in the Study of Religion - 15PSRC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 One option from courses in South Asia Modern Bengal: the Evolution of Bengali Culture and Society from 1690 to the Present Day (MA) - 15PSAC289 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 A Language course (subject to availability) One Language Acquisition course taught at SOAS (list available from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures) Destinations An MA in Critical Media and Cultural Studies from SOAS gives students expertise in media and communications as well as the ability to identify and analyse critical issues in media and cultural studies in their full global context. It is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Students develop a portfolio of transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and creative capacities including communication skills, interpersonal skills, team work, flexibility and dedication. A Student's Perspective "If you have ever wondered why you are the only person you know who is remotely interested in the Sogdian language, Achaemenid legal codes or Biblical references to the playing of the lute, take heart. SOAS is waiting for you." Fiona O’Cleirigh [-]

MA Gender and Sexuality

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Gender Studies is widely regarded by a range of employers as an excellent training, equipping holders of the degree with a range of relevant employable skills. [+]

MA Gender and Sexuality Programme Code: TBC Duration: One calendar year (full-time). Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second (2:1) UK BA degree in a relevant subject, 3.6 (USA) or equivalent. Relevant professional and activist experience will be taken into account. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for?: The MA Gender and Sexuality at SOAS aims to cater for students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives: those coming from Women’s Studies or Gender Studies who wish to engage more deeply with gender theory in relation to regional specialisation and to connect this with the societies of Asia, Africa and the Middle East; those coming from Asian, African or Middle Eastern Studies who wish to incorporate the study of gender and sexuality into their own areas of expertise; and those having previously trained in particular disciplines, such as Anthropology, Comparative Literature, Cultural and Media Studies, History, Politics, Religious Studies, Sociology, Refugee/Diaspora Studies. The programme provides: specialised research training in Gender Studies, in addition to focused study of sexuality as well as gender and sexual diversity. This pathway is suitable for students considering advanced postgraduate research in Gender Studies with a regional specialisation; a broad MA programme for students with some background in Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Area Studies etc. who wish to enhance their knowledge of gender in relation to cross-cultural issues raised by appreciation of the relationship between gender and sexuality in various legal and political contexts; a special interest MA, which enables students to study gender issues in depth in relation to a particular regional or disciplinary specialisation alongside the acquisition of knowledge of emergent and contemporary study of sexuality in cross-cultural contexts. The MA Gender and Sexuality at SOAS is a unique programme, its principal aim being to re-focus issues prioritised in western Gender Studies and the study of sexuality on the complex specificities of Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East. The programme offers the specialised study of gender and sexuality in relation to the cultures of Asia, Africa and the Middle East, together with rigorous training in, and questioning of, contemporary gender theory. In terms of gender theory, it offers a solid foundation with sufficient breadth and depth to facilitate a range of specialist pathways. In terms of specialisation, it draws on the expertise of internationally recognised scholars of Asian, African and Middle Eastern Studies at SOAS. Gender Studies is widely regarded by a range of employers as an excellent training, equipping holders of the degree with a range of relevant employable skills. Increasingly policy makers and governing structures understand the need to engage with gender and sexuality, such that graduates with disciplinary understanding of gender and sexuality, especially as sites of rights and responsibility are required in policy, research and legal environments. The value and relevance of the discipline are evidenced by the great variety and distinction of careers gender studies graduates have embarked upon with success. These include employment in international organizations, NGOs, think tanks, research organizations, the media (newspapers, radio & TV), as well as government ministries and programmes. There are growing numbers of gender studies programmes at universities throughout the world, although very few that combine study of gender and sexuality in a global context. Structure Students take courses to the value of three units and complete a dissertation as a fourth module. All students take Gender Theory and the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East (full unit) and Queer Politics in Asia, Africa and the Middle East (half unit) as core courses. A further 1.5 units are chosen from a wide range of gender and gender-related courses included in Gender Studies List 1. Students will write a 10,000 word dissertation based on either the compulsory course or one of the component courses. Students are also required to attend regular seminars organised by the Centre for Gender Studies, details of which are included in the handbook and further details of which are advertised on the Centre’s website and notice board. As part of the course, the Centre for Gender Studies offers integrated work experiences in the form of internships with relevant organizations such as Women Living Under Muslim World (WLUML), the Council for the Assistance of Academic Refugees (CARA) and other organizations as well as with the Centre for Gender Studies itself. Core Courses Gender theory and the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PGNC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Queer Politics in Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PGNH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Dissertation in gender studies - 15PGNC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year One and a half units must be chosen from this list Architectural Boundaries and the Body - 15PARH063 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Critical Theory and the Study of Religions - 15PSRC037 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Ethnicity, Religion and Gender in Middle Eastern Musical cultures - 15PMUH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit) - Full Year Gendering migration & diasporas - 15PGNH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Gender and Christianity - 15PSRH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender, Law and Society in The Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender and Music (MMus) - 15PMUH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender in the Middle East - 15PGNH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender in the Middle East II - 15PGNH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Gender in the Middle East (15PGNH001) is a pre-requisite for this course. Historical Perspectives on Gender in Africa - 15PHIH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Imagining Pakistan: culture, politics, gender (MA) - 15PSAC313 (1 Unit) - Full Year Issues in the Anthropology of Gender - 15PANH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Judaism and Gender - 15PSRH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Migration, Gender and The Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The Body and the Making of Colonial Difference in British India - 15PHIH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Materials Students will have access to a wealth of study resources available in the SOAS Library and in nearby institutions such as the British Library, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University College London Library and Senate House Library. Teaching & Learning Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. Each taught course has its own approved methods of assessment, designed to address the particular learning outcomes of that course. Assessment methods may include essays, weekly reaction papers, unseen, seen or take-home examinations, research projects, individual or group presentations, translations, learning journals, oral examinations etc., as appropriate. Students are also required to attend regular seminars organised by the Centre for Gender Studies, details of which are included in the handbook and further details of which are advertised on the Centre’s website and notice board. A Student's Perspective "I will remember great and long-lasting discussions, helpful and open-minded people and teachers who have time for their students." Franziska Korn [-]

MA Gender Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

SOAS MA in Gender Studies is unique in that it refocuses issues of Western Gender Studies on the complex specificities of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the expertise of staff across all SOAS faculties, it offers the specialised study of gender in relation to Asian, African and Middle Eastern cultures, together with rigorous training in and questioning of contemporary gender theory. [+]

MA Gender Studies Duration: One calendar year (full-time). Two or three years (part-time, daytime only). Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class (II.1) or above honours degree (or equivalent) Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time SOAS MA in Gender Studies is unique in that it refocuses issues of Western Gender Studies on the complex specificities of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the expertise of staff across all SOAS faculties, it offers the specialised study of gender in relation to Asian, African and Middle Eastern cultures, together with rigorous training in and questioning of contemporary gender theory. Students will have access to a wealth of study resources available in the SOAS Library and in nearby institutions such as the British Library, University College London Library and Senate House Library. The MA in Gender Studies will be administered by the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences. Like the MA Area Studies programmes, it will not have a specific departmental home, reflecting its academic structure as an interdisciplinary degree. The SOAS MA in Gender Studies will appeal to students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives: those coming from Women's Studies or Gender Studies who wish to engage more deeply with gender theory in relation to regional specialisation, especially, but not exclusively, the societies of Asia, Africa and the Middle East; those coming from Asian, African or Middle Eastern Studies who wish to incorporate the study of gender into their own areas of expertise; and those having previously trained in particular disciplines, such as Anthropology, Cultural and Media Studies, Religious Studies, Comparative Literature, History, Politics, etc. By selection of courses to suit the academic needs of each student, this programme can provide: Specialised research training MA in Gender Studies, perhaps including a relevant language. This pathway is suitable for students contemplating advanced postgraduate research in Gender Studies with regard to regional specialisation. A broad MA programme for students with some background in Women's Studies, Gender Studies, and Area Studies etc. who wish to enhance their knowledge of gender in relation to cross-cultural issues, with or without language study. A special interest MA, which enables students to study in depth gender issues in relation to a particular regional or disciplinary specialisation. Structure The programme is structured in the same way as most SOAS MA degrees: students take three taught units and complete a dissertation. All students take the compulsory course Gender Theory and the Study of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Further options include a wide range of gender and gender-related courses from a comprehensive list offered by the Faculties of Languages and Cultures and Arts and Humanities. Students will write a 10,000 word dissertation based on either the compulsory course or one of the component courses. Core Course Gender theory and the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PGNC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in gender studies - 15PGNC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year List 1- Optional Course At least one unit (one or two courses) must be chosen from this list. Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender in the Middle East - 15PGNH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender in the Middle East II - 15PGNH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Gender in the Middle East (15PGNH001) is a pre-requisite for this course. Queer Politics in Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PGNH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Gendering migration & diasporas - 15PGNH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in the Anthropology of Gender - 15PANH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit) - Full Year Critical Theory and the Study of Religions - 15PSRC037 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Migration, Gender and The Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Imagining Pakistan: culture, politics, gender (MA) - 15PSAC313 (1 Unit) - Full Year Historical Perspectives on Gender in Africa - 15PHIH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender and Music (MMus) - 15PMUH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender and Christianity - 15PSRH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Judaism and Gender - 15PSRH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Arabic Women's Writing: Theories and Practices - 15PNMC411 (1 Unit) - Full Year Architectural Boundaries and the Body - 15PARH063 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 The Body and the Making of Colonial Difference in British India - 15PHIH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Ethnicity, Religion and Gender in Middle Eastern Musical cultures - 15PMUH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender, Law and Society in The Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 UCL Optional Course The course unit offered this year at UCL is Gender Policy and Planning (Development and Planning Unit, terms 1&2, 0.5units). List 2- Optional Course Remaining units must be taken from this list. Civil society, social movements and the development process - 15PDSH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Comparative politics of the Middle East - 15PPOC026 (1 Unit) - Full Year African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World - 15PANC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law and Society in The Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 African and Asian Cultures in Britain - 15PANH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies I: History and Politics - 15PNMH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies II: Culture and Society - 15PNMH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Indonesia on Screen(PG) - 15PSEH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Law and Society in South Asia (Ma/Llm) - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law, Human Rights and Peace Building: The Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Trends in Islam - 15PNMC228 (1 Unit) - Full Year Travelling Africa: Writing the Cape to Cairo - 15PAFC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Cinema, Nation and the Transcultural - 15PJKC023 (1 Unit) - Full Year Indian Cinema: Key Issues - 15PSAH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Social and Political Dimensions of Modern Arabic Literature - 15PNMC347 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Literatures of South Asia - 15PSAC284 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Vietnam on Screen (PG) - 15PSEH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Violence, justice and the politics of memory - 15PPOH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Language Optional Course One language acquisition course may be taken. Please see Faculty of Languages and Cultures for options. A Student's Perspective "SOAS was my only choice of postgrad school after working various internships in the field of international development and seeing the reputation it had, and the number of my mentors who had studied here." Mary Bridger [-]

MA Gender Studies and Law

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This is a unique programme, its principal aim being to re-focus issues prioritised in western Gender Studies and Legal Theory on the complex specificities of Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East. [+]

MA Gender Studies and Law Programme Code: PGTF0038/PGTP0057/PGTP0058 Duration: One calendar year (full-time). Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class (II.1) or above honours degree (or equivalent) Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for?: The MA Gender Studies and Law at SOAS caters for students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives: those coming from Women’s Studies or Gender Studies who wish to engage more deeply with gender theory in relation to regional specialisation and to connect this with legal knowledge, especially, but not exclusively, the societies of Asia, Africa and the Middle East; those coming from Asian, African or Middle Eastern Studies who wish to incorporate the study of gender and law into their own areas of expertise; and those having previously trained in particular disciplines, such as Anthropology, Comparative Literature, Cultural and Media Studies, History, Politics, Religious Studies, Sociology, Refugee/Diaspora Studies etc. This programme provides: specialised research training in Gender Studies, in addition to focused study of feminist legal theories and a particular area of law. This pathway is suitable for students considering advanced postgraduate research in Gender Studies with a regional specialisation; a broad MA programme for students with some background in Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Area Studies etc. who wish to enhance their knowledge of gender in relation to cross-cultural legal issues; a special interest MA, which enables students to study gender issues in depth in relation to a particular regional or disciplinary specialisation alongside the acquisition of knowledge of feminist legal approaches and a study of a legal sub-discipline. The MA Gender Studies and Law at SOAS is a unique programme, its principal aim being to re-focus issues prioritised in western Gender Studies and Legal Theory on the complex specificities of Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East. Jointly housed by the Centre for Gender Studies and the School of Law, the programme offers the specialised study of gender and law in relation to the cultures of Asia, Africa and the Middle East, together with rigorous training in, and questioning of, contemporary gender theory. In terms of gender theory, it offers a solid foundation with sufficient breadth and depth to facilitate a range of specialist pathways. In terms of specialisation, it draws on the expertise of internationally recognised scholars of Asian, African and Middle Eastern Studies at SOAS. Structure Students take courses to the value of four units and complete a dissertation (which is also the assessment for the fourth course Feminist Legal Theory). All students take the Preliminary course in law, legal reasoning and legal methods. This is a compulsory component which runs as an intensive two-week course in September, prior to the start of term. All students take the compulsory core courses Gender Theory and the Study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East and Feminist Legal Theory (Dissertation). Further options include a wide range of gender and gender-related courses from a comprehensive list. Students also choose one Law option from the general MA in Law list (subject to course convenor approval). Upon completion of coursework and written examinations in May/June, students will write a 10,000 word dissertation based on material acquired from Feminist Legal Theory. Core Courses Preliminary law, legal reasoning and legal methods - 15PLAC162 (0 Unit) - Term 1 Gender theory and the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PGNC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Feminist legal theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit) - Full Year List 1- Optional Course At least one unit (one or two courses) must be chosen from this list. Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender in the Middle East - 15PGNH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gendering migration & diasporas - 15PGNH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Gender and development - 15PDSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Queer Politics in Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PPOH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in the Anthropology of Gender - 15PANH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Critical Theory and the Study of Religions - 15PSRC037 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2014/2015 Migration, gender and the law in South East Asia and beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PLAH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2014/2015 Imagining Pakistan: culture, politics, gender (MA) - 15PSAC313 (1 Unit) - Full Year Historical Perspectives on Gender in Africa - 15PHIH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2014/2015 Gender and Music (MMus) - 15PMUH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2014/2015 Gender and Christianity - 15PSRH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2014/2015 Judaism and Gender - 15PSRH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2014/2015 List 2- Optional Course Remaining units must be taken from this list. Access to justice & dispute resolution: special applications - 15PLAC157 (1 Unit) - Full Year Affirmative action law - 15PLAH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2014/2015 Alternative dispute resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit) - Full Year Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2014/2015 Colonialism, empire and international law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Comparative Constitutional Law - 15PLAH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Development, environment and the law in the South - 15PLAC158 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2014/2015 Foundations of international law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Human rights and Islamic law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit) - Full Year Human rights of women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2014/2015 Human rights in the developing world - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit) - Full Year Indigenous Land Rights - 15PLAH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2014/2015 International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit) - Full Year International law and global orders - 15PLAH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2014/2015 International protection of human rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law and development in Africa - 15PLAC160 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law and Governance in the Developing World - 15PLAH047 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Law and international inequality:critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law and society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law and society in South Asia (MA/LLM) - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law, human rights and peace building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law, institutions and political economy of transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit) - Full Year Law, Multiculturalism and Intercultural Human Rights (MA/LLM) - 15PLAC109 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2014/2015 Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year Materials Students will have access to a wealth of study resources available in the SOAS Library and in nearby institutions such as the British Library, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University College London Library and Senate House Library. Teaching & Learning Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects. Each taught course has its own approved methods of assessment, designed to address the particular learning outcomes of that course. Assessment methods may include essays, weekly reaction papers, unseen, seen or take-home examinations, research projects, individual or group presentations, translations, learning journals, oral examinations etc., as appropriate. Students are also required to attend regular seminars organised by the Centre for Gender Studies, details of which are included in the handbook and further details of which are advertised on the Centre’s website and notice board. A Student's Perspective "The MA in Gender Studies at SOAS has introduced me to a wide horizon of disciplines within Gender Studies. Through this particular MA program I have had the privilege of learning not only from my peers, who come from diverse backgrounds and perspectives, but also from teachers and scholars who specialise in the study of gender within various disciplines." Naureen Ali [-]

MA Global Creative and Cultural Industries

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  August 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme offers the unique opportunity to critically analyse these developments in a fully global context, across the full range of School of Arts courses in Media, Music and Art and Archaeology. [+]

MA Global Creative and Cultural Industries Duration: Full time: 1 calendar year Part time: 2 or 3 calendar years. We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study. Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Over the past decades the creative and cultural industries have become the focus of a huge amount of research and critical debate. As digitisation transforms the media industries, from music streaming to on-demand TV, there has been an increasing recognition of the economic and cultural value of art, museums, video games and 'heritage'. This programme offers the unique opportunity to critically analyse these developments in a fully global context, across the full range of School of Arts courses in Media, Music and Art and Archaeology. Students can tailor their studies to focus on particular regions, art forms or themes, choosing from the wide array of courses that reflect the unique regional focus available at SOAS, and gain access to world-leading experts on the music, culture and traditions of Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Alongside critical analysis and regional expertise students can choose from a number of practical hands-on courses, in sound recording, podcasting and broadcasting, that will enable them to enhance their skill-set. This course has been designed for those seeking to work in some capacity in the creative and cultural sector - either as an artist or producer, or in cultural policy, development or analysis. It also suits anyone looking to establish a research profile in Global Creative and Cultural Industries. Structure The MA has a core component comprising two half-unit courses, the first (‘Analytical Approaches to the Global Creative and Cultural Industries’) taken by all students, and the second allowing students to develop their expertise in a ‘pathway’ (chosen from ‘The Music Business’, ‘Asia and Africa on Display: Objects, Exhibitions and Transculturation’, ‘Studies in Global Media and Post-National Communication’, ‘Global Film Industries’). Practical/skills courses can then be chosen in multimedia (film/editing), sound recording, and digital and broadcasting communications; while optional, one of these will be required if a student elects to take the optional half-unit course ‘Directed Study in Industry’ but lacks appropriate skills training on entry. ‘Directed Study in Industry’ allows students to undertake an internship with an institution, organisation or enterprise. Additional regional and theoretical courses are available from existing School of Arts and other SOAS MA/MMus programmes. The Dissertation will be on a topic relating to the creative and cultural industries. It may either be on a theoretical topic or develop from the ‘pathway’ chosen by the student, and it has the option to incorporate multimedia materials. Core Courses In addition to the dissertation and the half unit "Analytical Approaches..." course, at least one further half unit Pathway course must be chosen. Analytical Approaches to the Global Creative and Cultural Industries - 15PMUH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Dissertation in Global Creative and Cultural Industries - 15PMUC998 (1 Unit) - Full Year Music Pathway Course The Music Business (Masters) - 15PMUH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Art Pathway Course Curating Cultures - 15PARH079 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Issues in Contemporary Southeast Asian Art - 15PARH083 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Museums, Anthropology and the Arts of Asia and Africa - 15PARH072 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Photography and the Image in Africa - 15PARH082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Media Pathway Course Students on the Media pathway will take at least one of these two courses. Qualitative Research Methods - 15PMSC033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Studies in Global Media and Post-National Communication - 15PMSH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Skills & Internship Courses Digital traditional broadcasting communication - 15PMSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Directed Study in Industry - 15PMSH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Sound Recording and Production - 15PMSH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Optional Courses Any remaining units may be chosen from this optional courses list. Approaches to Critical Interpretation & Aesthetic Theories - 15PARC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arab Painting - 15PARH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Art and Architecture of the Fatimids - 15PARH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Arts and Society in sub-Saharan Africa - 15PARH052 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Arts of Modern and Contemporary China (since 1800) - 15PARH055 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Aspects of Music and Religion in South East Asia - 15PMUH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Atlantic Africa: (P)Layers of Mediation in African Popular Music (PG) - 15PMUC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Central Asian Music - 15PMUH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Contemporary Art and the Global - 15PARH085 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Curating Africa: African Film and Video in the Age of Festivals - 15PAFH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Curating Cultures - 15PARH079 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Diaspora Contexts and Visual Culture - 15PARH042 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender and Music (MMus) - 15PMUH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian Cinema: Its History and Social Context - 15PSAH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Indian Cinema: Key Issues - 15PSAH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian vocal music: Styles and histories - 15PMUH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 International Political Communication - 15PMSH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Iranian media and film - 15PMSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islam and the West: Artistic and Cultural Contacts - 15PARH034 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Japanese Television since 1953 - 15PJKC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Japanese Transnational Cinema: From Kurosawa to Asia Extreme and Studio Ghibli - 15PJKH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Klezmer Music: Roots and Revival - 15PMUH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Mediated Culture in the Middle East: Politics and Communications - 15PMSH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern and Contemporary Korean Art - 15PARH060 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern Film from Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora - 15PCHH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Music and Healing - 15PMUH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Music in Development - 15PMUC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Music in Selected Regions of Africa: Contexts and Structures - 15PMUC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Music, Place and Politics in Cuba - 15PMUH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Painting and Visual Culture in China - 15PARC043 (1.0 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Perspectives On Development - 15PANH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Popular and Fusion Music in South East Asia (PG) - 15PMUH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 (Post) Colonialism and Otherness in South East Asia on Screen - 15PSEH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Raga: concept and practice (PG) - 15PMUH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Sacred Sound in South Asia - 15PMUH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Studies in Media, Information Communication Technologies and Development - 15PMSH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use - 15PMSH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Transnational Communities and Diasporic Media:Networking, Connectivity, Identity - 15PMSH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Teaching & Learning Students will likely fall into two types. The first group will typically be interested in pursuing careers as practitioners, managers, consultants, policy advisers and entrepreneurs in the creative and cultural industries in Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, Asia and Africa. Such students will typically take advantage of the potentials to hone practical/core skills, to develop their knowledge base about creative and cultural industries in a global context, and to maximise the ‘Directed Study in Industry’ opportunity. The second group will typically be more concerned with developing academic research in the creative and cultural sectors, and the intersections between industry, cultural policy and international development. Such students will most likely concentrate their programme of study on the regional and theoretical courses available. The MA, then, is suitable for those seeking employment as practitioners, managers, consultants, policy advisers and entrepreneurs in the creative and cultural industries, and for those who aspire to a Research degree. Learning Outcomes Knowledge Broad knowledge of the creative and cultural industries in the global context. Detailed knowledge of the creative and cultural industries of Asia, Africa or the Middle East. Through the choice of a ‘pathway’, specialist knowledge of creative and cultural industries as they pertain to music, media, film or art/archaeology. Through the independent research and writing of a dissertation, profound knowledge of one pertinent aspect of the creative and cultural industries. Intellectual (thinking) skills To analyse and assess the creative and cultural industries. To write critically about the creative and cultural industries, and about the music, media, film, or arts of Asia, Africa or the Middle East. To read critically a wide range of sources, to critically appraise music, media, film and art sources, and to synthesise different perspectives. To discuss and debate in seminar and tutorial contexts, and to present materials to peer groups. Subject-based practical skills Practical skills in one or more of film/video production and editing, radio and digital media skills, music recording skills. To appraise and discuss the development and operation of the creative and cultural industries, with a focus on one or more of the music, media, film, art/archaeology components. To read and critique the writing of prior researchers and commentators Transferable skills To understand and critique the development and operation of the creative and cultural industries. The ability to address and understand non-Western creative and cultural industries, and thereby to have an openness towards non-Western cultures. As an option, work experience through the ‘Directed Study in Industry’ course. As options, practical skills in one or more of film/video production and editing, radio and digital media skills, and music recording skills. To function effectively as a researcher of and contributor to the creative and cultural industries. A Student's Perspective "I have found studying at SOAS an unbelievable experience, especially as the library houses a unique collections of both print and electronic resources." Zahrah Mamode [-]

MA Global Digital Cultures

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 United Kingdom London

This programme explores the global dimensions of digital culture, focusing on digital creativity and practices in the global South. Students are taught to understand the historical development of digital technologies and the internet, exploring their impact and meaning in diverse economic, political and cultural realms. [+]

MA Global Digital Cultures Start of programme: September 2016 Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time The emergence of the internet and digital culture has affected all societies, albeit unevenly. This programme explores the global dimensions of digital culture, focusing on digital creativity and practices in the global South. Students are taught to understand the historical development of digital technologies and the internet, exploring their impact and meaning in diverse economic, political and cultural realms. They study contemporary theories of the digital and consider their adequacy for understanding the non-Western world, while developing knowledge of a range of research tools for understanding the internet, social media and big data. Students are encouraged to develop arguments about the global dimensions of digital culture in written and oral forms. In addition, they explore the shifting lines between theory and practice by becoming digital adepts, developing collective and individual blogs and acquiring other digital multi-media skills. The programme is designed for those wishing to be active in the growing digital culture markets in the global South; personnel working for NGOs and other organizations involved in new media and development; policymakers for digital innovation; and diplomats faced with new digital diplomacy. It is an excellent platform for those wishing to undertake MPhil/PhD research on global digital cultures. Understand the historical development of digital technologies and the internet Explore the impact and meaning of such technologies in diverse economic, political and cultural realms, especially within the global South Become familiar with contemporary theories of the digital and their adequacy for understanding the global South Understand the range of new research tools for understanding the Internet, social media and big data Develop coherent arguments about these topics in both written and oral forms Explore the shifting lines between theory and practice by becoming digital adepts, developing collective and individual blogs and acquiring other digital multi-media skills Structure Theoretical Issues in Global Digital Cultures - 15PMSC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2014/2015 Studies in Global Digital Cultures - (0.5 Unit) Dissertation in Global Digital Cultures - 15PMSC994 (1 Unit) - Full Year A Student's Perspective "The Centre for Media and Film Studies has been a turning point in my academic, professional, and epistemological life. I will never read, watch or receive information or media products as before." Osama Salameh [-]

MA Global Diplomacy (Online Learning)

Online Full time Part time 2 - 5  April 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Learn about the key concepts of diplomacy and the institutional development of diplomatic relations. You will also gain in-depth knowledge of negotiations processes through the course's core module, The Art of Negotiation. In addition, you will be able to select modules according to your interests and career goals, including International Security, Diplomatic Systems, and America and the World: US Foreign Policy. [+]

Start of programme: April and October Mode of Attendance: On-Line Programme description Learn about the key concepts of diplomacy and the institutional development of diplomatic relations. You will also gain in-depth knowledge of negotiations processes through the course's core module, The Art of Negotiation. In addition, you will be able to select modules according to your interests and career goals, including International Security, Diplomatic Systems, and America and the World: US Foreign Policy. Established in 2013 and based on 20 years of experience within Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy (CISD), MA Global Diplomacy will allow you to deepen your understanding of international affairs and contemporary diplomatic practice. The programme brings together cutting-edge research in delivering an engaging and stimulating student experience in a dynamic field of study. You will acquire the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to proceed to careers in a range of professional contexts where diplomacy is relevant, while also providing the learning opportunities to enable you, as a postgraduate student, to acquire the interdisciplinary knowledge to undertake further advanced studies and research in the area of global diplomacy.The course has its foundations in an established heritage of high-quality teaching and research within SOAS' Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy (CISD). The mission of CISD is to promote multi-disciplinary teaching that combines the distinctive expertise of SOAS with cutting-edge research and public discussion of diplomacy and international politics in a globalised world. Who is this programme for? Relevant for those engaged in or embarking on a career in diplomatic or related fields requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments.By studying online you will also have the flexibility to integrate studies into your working life without having to take a career break. Email: glodipadmin@soas.ac.uk Phone: +44 (0)20 7898 4050 For further details, please visit SOAS website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/maglobaldiplomacy/ [-]

MA Global Diplomacy: South Asia (Online Learning)

Online Full time Part time 2 - 5  April 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Deepen your understanding of international affairs and contemporary diplomatic practice with a regional focus on South Asia & Afghanistan. This programme will give you a theoretically and historically informed understanding of the practice of international diplomacy, broadly conceived, and its applications in South Asia. [+]

Mode of Attendance: On-line Deepen your understanding of international affairs and contemporary diplomatic practice with a regional focus on South Asia & Afghanistan. This programme will give you a theoretically and historically informed understanding of the practice of international diplomacy, broadly conceived, and its applications in South Asia. Research is a key component of this programme upon completion will give students the skills to: think critically, with reference to theoretical and empirical (historical and/or contemporary) content about international studies, diplomacy, and political economy in South Asia develop and practice the ability to see – and to comment on – the strengths and the weaknesses of others’ ideas and arguments. The programme is delivered by the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy (CISD) and the SOAS South Asia Institute (SSAI), in association with the FCO's Diplomatic Academy, using a combination of multi-disciplinary teaching, cutting-edge research and public discussion of diplomacy and international politics in a globalised world. This programme is available as a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate level. Please see the Structure tab for more information. Who is this course for? This course is for those engaged in or embarking on a career in diplomatic or related fields in South Asia requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments. Email: glodipadmin@soas.ac.uk Phone: +44 (0)20 7898 4050 For further details, please visit the SOAS website [-]

MA Globalisation and Multinational Corporations

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA Globalisation and Multinational Corporations (GMC) programme is designed for those engaged in, or aspiring to, professional careers in the public, corporate or not-for-profit sectors related to the political and economic management and regulation of multinational corporations. [+]

MA Globalisation and Multinational Corporations Duration: One calendar year (full time). Two or three years (part time) Minimum Entry Requirements: A minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). We welcome applications from academically strong individuals from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds. Candidates with a lower class degree but with degree-relevant work experience may be considered. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for?: The MA Globalisation and Multinational Corporations (GMC) programme is designed for those engaged in, or aspiring to, professional careers in the public, corporate or not-for-profit sectors related to the political and economic management and regulation of multinational corporations. GMC specifically addresses the requirements of those seeking a comprehensive theoretical and practical understanding of the role and dynamics of large corporations in the global economy and international affairs. The programme aims to prepare students for a variety of roles in government departments, regulatory agencies, international organisations (such as the OECD or WTO) industry bodies, NGOs, as advisors, managers, researchers or project professionals with multinational corporations, trade unions and advocacy organisations. The programme has a multi-disciplinary structure and draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. In addition to the three core modules of Multinational Enterprises, Global Public Policy and Project Management, students choose other modules to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests. Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Geneva and Paris. Programme objectives Excellent understanding of the development and activities of Multinational Enterprises (MNE) and their regulation from economic and legal perspectives. Excellent knowledge of economic, legal and public policy approaches to researching MNE organisation, impact and regulation in the global economy. Ability to critically analyse and design solutions to regulatory and public policy challenges related to MNE activities in both the global North and South. Development of practical skills including policy analysis, project management, advocacy, negotiation and strategic communication. We welcome applications from academically strong individuals from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds; however, is not necessary to have a first degree in a discipline directly related to globalisation and multinational corporations. Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field. Structure Students take taught modules to the value of 3 full units plus 10,000 word dissertation One unit and two half units from A (compulsory) One unit (or two half units) from B or C Dissertation (compulsory) on a topic related to the programme’s core themes A). Globalisation and Multinational Corporations modules Global Public Policy Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World: Economic and Legal Perspectives Project Management B). Additional modules available from the Centre Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific International Politics of Transitional Justice International Relations 1; Foundations of World Politics International Relations 2; Contemporary World Politics International Law 1; Foundation International Economics International Security Global Energy and Climate Policy Sport and Diplomacy: "More than a Game" History and Future of the United Nations Global Advocacy C). Electives Please note that acceptance onto an elective module is subject to availability of places, timetabling and the approval of the convenor of that module. Suggested electives for Globalisation and Multinational Corporations students Full Unit modules (1.0) China and International Politics Chinese Commercial Law Comparative Politics of the Middle East Economic Development of South East Asia Economic Dynamics of the Asia-Pacific Region Economic Problems and Policies in Modern China Government and Politics in Africa Government and Politics of Modern South Asia Government and Politics of Modern South East Asia International Politics of East Asia Modern Chinese Law and Human Rights State and Society in the Chinese Political Process Taiwan's Politics and Cross-Strait Relations Theory, Policy and Practice of Development Half Unit modules (0.5) Corporate Finance Corporate Governance Economic Development of Modern Taiwan Finance in the Global Market Financial Law International Human Resource Management International Management International Marketing International Political Communication Islamic Banking and Finance Japanese Modernity 1 Japanese Modernity 2 Legal Aspects of Corporate Finance Legal Aspects of International Finance Management in China 1: domestic perspectives Management in China 2: international perspectives Management in Japan 1: economic development and business environment Management in Japan 2: current Issues in Japanese business and management Power in World Politics Research Methods in Management Risk Management The Making of the Contemporary World Topics in the Chinese Economy Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use Disclaimer Although all GMC core modules run every year, we cannot guarantee that all elective modules offered during the pre-registration period will be available for each academic session. Important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules. Teaching & Learning The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full time employment. Participants may choose a combination of modules to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists. Lectures for GMC modules usually take place in the evening (18.00-20.00) and associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots starting as early as 14.00 for some modules, with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each GMC module taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends. Teaching includes Theory and practice of Multinational Enterprises and their regulation in a globalising world Global Public Policy theory and practice Project Management Practical toolkit in policy analysis and planning, strategic communication, risk management and negotiation skills Interaction with policymakers, regulators and government officials, MNE executives, NGO representatives, and other practitioners An elective from a wide range: International Relations, International Law, International Economics, International Security, Global Energy and Climate Policy, or a module offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law, Languages, etc) Further activities Also included in the degree programme: Week long study trip to Geneva and Paris Study trips to major multinational enterprises Advanced media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners (visit the CISD website to listen to the podcasts) Opportunities to actively participate in Centre research programmes A Student's Perspective "I had been looking for a qualification that would enhance my employability in the private sector for some time. I believe I found it in the Globalisation and Multinational Corporations programme at CISD." Alessandra Awolowo [-]

MA Historical Research Methods and Intensive Language

Campus Full time Part time 2 - 4  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time. [+]

MA Historical Research Methods and Intensive Language Duration: Full-time: 2 years; Part-time: 4 years Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent); relevant background in the region of specialism Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time. The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language. Career opportunities include: Further historical research (PhD) Research positions in government institutions, NGOs, journalism, etc. This is the only Master-level programme in Historical Research Methods focusing on the study of Asia and Africa in the UK. It provides the unique opportunity to develop and carry out a research project under the guidance of regional specialists and thus an ideal preparation for a research degree. It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe. Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page. The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (ak49@soas.ac.uk). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1. The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Structure Students take 4 course units over the period of their programme of study (i.e. 2 or 4 years). This includes the core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit), which is taught on a one-to-one basis by the dissertation supervisor, the compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa (1 unit), a minor course or courses (to the value of 1 unit) from a list of approved options and/or a language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures, and a 10,000 word dissertation (1 unit). In the intensive language pathways, students take 2 intensive language units and one history unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take 1 language unit and 2 history units and complete work on their dissertation (1 unit). For example, Year 1: 2 intensive language units + compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa; Year 2: 1 intensive language unit + core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit) + minor courses to the value of 1 unit + dissertation. Year abroad Yes (Summer of first year) Teaching & Learning Aims and Outcomes Knowledge of a variety of theoretical issues and methodological approaches relevant for the study of historical problems Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history A sound grounding for further research, either in a doctoral programme or in a professional environment A near proficient ability in the a language. Knowledge How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations. How to formulate and carry out a research project, based on a thorough knowledge and understanding of the particular field of study chosen by the student, the relevant literature and current debates. Language skills appropriate to chosen region of study. Intellectual (thinking) skills Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and reassess evidence for themselves. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general. Subject-based practical skills Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects. Effective use of relevant professional databases. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language Transferable skills Critical thinking. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines. A Student's Perspective "SOAS's history department also attracted me because of their continued recognition for staff-student ratio and the high quality research that is carried out in the department." Dominic Stephen Poon [-]

MA History

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The programme is designed for students with a keen interest in studying the remote as well as the more recent past of the countries, peoples, and cultures of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. It is also ideal for students who seek to understand the historical conditions of the contemporary world from a global perspective. While the course is open to students with backgrounds in a diverse range of disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences, the ideal applicant would have an UG degree in History or a relevant area studies programme, some knowledge of foreign, in particular Asian or African languages, and preferably relevant background in the region of specialism. [+]

MA History Duration: Full-time: 12 months; Part-time: 24 or 36 months Minimum Entry Requirements: Normally, an Upper Second Class Honours degree of a UK university, or an overseas qualification of an equivalent standard obtained after a course of study extending over not less than three years in a university (or educational institution of university rank), in History, or a related discipline in the Humanities or Social Sciences. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time The programme is designed for students with a keen interest in studying the remote as well as the more recent past of the countries, peoples, and cultures of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. It is also ideal for students who seek to understand the historical conditions of the contemporary world from a global perspective. While the course is open to students with backgrounds in a diverse range of disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences, the ideal applicant would have an UG degree in History or a relevant area studies programme, some knowledge of foreign, in particular Asian or African languages, and preferably relevant background in the region of specialism. This is one of the few Master-level programmes in History focusing on the study of Asia, the Middle East and Africa in the UK. With its high concentration of expertise of these regions, SOAS can offer an unrivalled breadth of courses on their histories. Apart from the possibility of acquiring regional expertise, the programme also provides a sound training in the historical sciences more generally. Students who wish to study manifestations of particular issues in a variety of regions may opt for the broader MA History. Others may prefer to focus on the study of a single region and choose one of the available regional pathways. These are MA History: Africa MA History: Near and Middle East MA History: South Asia MA History: South East Asia MA History: East Asia Students in this programme take three units of taught courses plus a 10,000 word dissertation. The proximity to the School of many archive depositories and records offices, including its own archival collection as well as the British Library, greatly enhances the potential for dissertation work. A broad range of courses is available in every single year (see 'Structure' tab for more details), though you may want to contact the programme convenor to ask about the availability of particular courses in a particular year. Those who wish to further develop their linguistic skills may choose from a range of African and Asian language courses. In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS have the opportunity to participate in the Regional History Seminars, as well as in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences, which regularly take place in different departments and centres across the School and at other colleges of the University of London. If you wish to continue your studies on the research level you may want to consider the MA in Historical Research Methods. English language requirements: Those whose mother tongue is not English must take the English test run by the British Council (IELTS) and obtain a score acceptable to the School. Structure The programme consists of four units in total: three units of taught courses and a 10,000 word dissertation worth one unit. One of the taught courses will be recognised as the student’s Major course and normally the dissertation will be on a topic linked to that course. Apart from the History courses, approved courses from other departments, language courses, and in some cases intercollegiate courses are available as additional options (see lists A to D below). The syllabus of the MA History includes the following elements: Courses totalling at least two units from List A, including a half or full unit designated as the Major course; Minor courses totalling one unit from Lists A [Major and minor history courses], B [Courses from other departments], C [Language courses] or D [Intercollegiate courses]; Dissertation in History (one unit) written in conjunction with the Major course. There are five regional pathways within the MA History: Africa, East Asia, Near and Middle East, South Asia and South East Asia. To meet the pathway requirement, students must choose courses from the relevant regional section in List A to the minimum value of 1.5 units (including their Major). If you have questions about pathway requirements, please contact the programme convenor. Please note that not all the courses listed here will be available every year, and some new courses are likely to be added. For up-to-date information consult the Convener of the History MA programme, who will also be happy to provide more detailed information on individual courses. Course Options Dissertation in History - 15PHIC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in History: Africa - 15PHIC993 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in History: East Asia - 15PHIC994 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in History: Near and Middle East - 15PHIC995 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in History: South Asia - 15PHIC996 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in History: South East Asia - 15PHIC997 (1 Unit) - Full Year LIST A: major and minor courses Comparative/Global The Making of the Contemporary World - 15PHIH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Environmental History of Asia - 15PHIH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Africa Slavery in West Africa in the 19th and 20th Centuries - 15PHIH028 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Historical Perspectives on Gender in Africa - 15PHIH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Social and Cultural Transformations in Southern Africa Since 1945 - 15PHIH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Colonial Conquest and Social Change in Southern Africa - 15PHIH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Warfare and the Military in Precolonial Africa - (0.5 Unit) Warfare and the Military in Modern Africa - (0.5 Unit) Near and Middle East The Early Development of Islam: Emerging Identities and Contending Views - (0.5 unit Unit) Iran and the Persianate World 1400 to 1800 - (0.5 Unit) Iran and the Persianate World 1800 to 1979 - (0.5 Unit) The End of Empire in the Middle East & the Balkans - 15PHIC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Encountering the Other: the Middle East during the Crusading Period - 15PHIH037 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modernity and the Transformation of the Middle East I - 15PHIH031 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modernity and the Transformation of the Middle East II - 15PHIH032 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The Origin of Islam: Sources and Perspectives - (0.5 Unit) Outsiders in Medieval Middle Eastern Societies: Minorities, Social Outcasts and Foreigners - 15PHIH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 South Asia Modern Muslim Thinkers of South Asia - 15PSRC169 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Islam In South Asia - (0.5 Unit) Gender, law and the family in the history of modern South Asia - 15PHIH030 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Colonialism and Nationalism in South Asia - 15PHIH041 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Body and the Making of Colonial Difference in British India - 15PHIH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 East Asia Japanese Modernity I - 15PHIH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Modernity II - 15PHIH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Knowledge and Power in Early Modern China - 15PHIH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Nationhood and Competing Identities in Modern China - 15PHIH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Topics in Modern Korean History - 15PEAC059 (1 Unit) - Full Year North Korea since 1945: the rise and decline of an East Asian developmental state - 15PJKH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Topics in the History of Traditional Korea - 15PEAC053 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 South East Asia Asian Armies and National Development - (0.5 unit Unit) Asian Wars : World War II and the End of Empire, 1942-1960 - 15 PHI H038 (0.5 unit Unit) World War II, Cold War, and the "War On Terror": the United States and South East Asia - 15PHIC059 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Histories of Ethnicity and Conflict in South East Asia 1 - Making States and Building Nations - 15PHIH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Histories of Ethnicity and Conflict in South East Asia 2 - Non-National Perspectives - 15PHIH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Methodology Research Methods in History With Special Reference to Asia and Africa - 15PHIC033 (1 Unit) - Full Year LIST B: Courses in other departments Oriental religions in European academia and imagination, 1815-1945 - 15PSRC168 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Methodology Media Production Skills - 15PANH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Africa Colonial and Christian Missions in Africa: Readings from the Archives - 15PSRH043 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Preaching, Prayer and Politics: Independent Christians in Southern Africa - 15PSRH042 (0.5 unit Unit) International politics of Africa - 15PPOC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year State & society in Asia & Africa - 15PPOC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Near and Middle East Topics in the History of Traditional Korea - 15PEAC053 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Comparative politics of the Middle East - 15PPOC026 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Modern Trends in Islam - 15PNMC228 (1 Unit) - Full Year Reading Classical Arabic Historians: Themes and Trends in Islamic Historiography - 15PNMC378 (1 Unit) - Full Year Israel, the Arab World and the Palestinians - 15PNMC038 (1 Unit) - Full Year Central Asia South Asia Contemporary Islamism in South Asia: Readings in Sayyid Abu al-A'la Mawdudi - 15PSRC170 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 History and Doctrines of Indian Buddhism - 15PSRC059 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 The Indian Temple - 15PARC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Pakistan: History, Culture, Islam - 15PSAC288 (1 unit Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Modern Bengal: the Evolution of Bengali Culture and Society from 1690 to the Present Day (MA) - 15PSAC289 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Literature & Colonialism in North India (Masters) - 15PSAH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 East Asia State and society in the Chinese political process - 15PPOC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) South East Asia Jawi and the Malay Manuscript Tradition (Masters) - 15PSEH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Government and politics of modern South East Asia - 15PPOC247 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) LIST C: Language courses, minor only Please contact the Faculty of Languages and Cultures for more information. Note that all applicants must be able to demonstrate some prior competence in learning languages, and for certain languages other restrictions apply. LIST D: Intercollegiate Courses Because of different MA structures in other Colleges, these courses have a variety of weightings, some of which are different from those at SOAS. Students may not take courses that are lighter in weight than their SOAS equivalent. They may take courses that are heavier, provided that they appreciate that there may be a greater work load involved. The programme convenor for the MA can give further advice. The weight of the courses is shown in ECTS points (European Credit Transfer Scheme). A SOAS full unit course is 22.5 ECTS points, and a half unit course is 11.25 ECTS. Teaching & Learning Lectures and Seminars Teaching is generally by informal lectures and seminar discussions. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take. In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS are able to participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London. Dissertation The 10,000-word Dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations A postgraduate degree from the History department at SOAS provides its students with an understanding of the world, giving them specialised historical knowledge and understanding of cultural sensibilities of a region. Postgraduate students are equipped with the expertise to continue in research as well as the skills needed to enable them to find professional careers in the private and public sectors. Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including familiarity with methods of research; the competence to manage large quantities of information; the ability to select and organise information and analytical skills. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Afghan Aid Amnesty International Church of England Dar Al Hekma College Department For Transport Högskolan Dalarna Home Office - UKBA Hongik University, South Korea MoD Dutch National Council for Culture Savannah Publications The Jewish Chronicle The Royal Institute of International Affairs World Youth Service Society Japan Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Community and Events Fundraiser Senior Learning and Impact Advisor International Director Head of Africa Department Senior Advocate Teacher Senior Information Management Officer Civil Servant Lecturer in History Associate Professor Consultant Account Manager Headmaster Political Editor Editor Manager and Research Fellow Counsellor A Student's Perspective "Studying history at SOAS has been an immersive experience unlike any other. The teaching has been passionate and engaging with a level of expertise hard to find elsewhere. It has encouraged us to constantly challenge the dominant narratives and developed our critical faculties. The student body is diverse and this adds to the discussions and perspectives in the classroom, enriching the learning environment. " Sehrish Javid [-]

MA History and Intensive Language

Campus Full time Part time 2 - 4  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. While the course is open to students from a broad range of backgrounds, the ideal applicant would have an UG degree in History (or a related discipline), some knowledge of foreign, including Asian or African languages, and preferably some relevant background in the region of specialism. [+]

MA History and Intensive Language Duration: 2 years full time, 4 years part time Minimum Entry Requirements: Normally, an Upper Second Class Honours degree of a UK university, or an overseas qualification of an equivalent standard obtained after a course of study extending over not less than three years in a university (or educational institution of university rank), in History, or a related discipline in the Humanities or Social Sciences. Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Who is this programme for? The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. While the course is open to students from a broad range of backgrounds, the ideal applicant would have an UG degree in History (or a related discipline), some knowledge of foreign, including Asian or African languages, and preferably some relevant background in the region of specialism. Graduates will find a wide range of career options open to them, in particular those involving inter-cultural or international contact, such as in international organizations, government institutions, non-profit organizations, and journalism, but also museums, educational institutions, or the publishing sector more generally. It would also be a suitable preparation for students considering embarking on a research degree focusing on one of the regional or topical areas of expertise represented in the department. The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language. This is the only Master-level programme in History focusing on the study of Asia, the Middle East and Africa in the UK, and can therefore offer an unrivalled breadth of courses on the history of these regions. The programme provides a sound training in the historical sciences. It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe. Structure The programme includes the following elements totalling four units: Courses totalling at least two units from List A [History courses], including a half or full unit designated as the Major course; further minor courses totalling one unit from Lists A [Major and minor history courses], B [Courses from other departments], C [Language courses] or D [Intercollegiate courses]; and a dissertation of 10,000 words written in conjunction with the Major course (one unit). There are five regional pathways within the MA History: Africa, East Asia, Near and Middle East, South Asia and South East Asia. To meet the pathway requirement, students must choose courses from the relevant regional section in List A to the minimum value of 1.5 units, including their Major. In the two-year intensive language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units. They would also be expected to choose a Major in which to write the dissertation. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA. Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page. The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (ak49@soas.ac.uk). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1. The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Year abroad Yes (summer) Teaching & Learning Aims and Outcomes An advanced understanding of the historical sciences and its various methodologies and approaches in general, and specialist knowledge of Asian and African history in particula Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history The critical, conceptual, and analytical skills required for historical research as well as for positions of responsibility in all other professions In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language. Knowledge Factual knowledge about the histories of Asian and African societies, the ways they interacted with each other and other world regions of the world, and the major historical forces that shaped our contemporary world. Familiarity with a variety of different approaches to historical research and current scholarly debates, and, on that basis, the ability to formulate a valuable research question. How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations. Language skills appropriate to chosen region and field of study (recommended). Intellectual (thinking) skills Students should be able to synthesize different kinds of information, become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and analyse and reassess evidence and research questions for themselves. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general. Subject-based practical skills Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, including relevant professional databases, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects. Ability to formulate research questions and design an independent research project, including the use of primary sources. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language Transferable skills Critical thinking. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines. A Student's Perspective "Having now experienced SOAS life, I can say there really is no other place quite like it" Soumaya Tidjani [-]

MA History of Art and/or Archaeology

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme is a unique opportunity to study the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Students concentrate on architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts and have the option of pursuing topics and approaches more archaeological in focus. They consider theoretical and methodological questions and are invited to question the relevance of the disciplinary distinction between History of Art and Archaeology to the study of the non-Western world. Courses cover a time period spanning from antiquity to present-day, contemporary art. [+]

MA History of Art and/or Archaeology Duration: One year (full-time). Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: The normal qualification for admission to the MA programme is an upper second class honours degree. Other qualifications, however, may be acceptable and the Department welcomes mature students. Students taking the MA degree may or may not have previous experience of our subjects. While knowledge of a relevant Asian or African language is not a requirement, for some courses it is an advantage for admission (see individual course descriptions for details). It is possible to include an element of language training within the MA programme by taking an Asian or African language as one of the two ‘minor’ courses. This option may be particularly desirable for those intending to progress to the PhD, who do not already have the necessary language skills. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This programme is a unique opportunity to study the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Students concentrate on architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts and have the option of pursuing topics and approaches more archaeological in focus. They consider theoretical and methodological questions and are invited to question the relevance of the disciplinary distinction between History of Art and Archaeology to the study of the non-Western world. Courses cover a time period spanning from antiquity to present-day, contemporary art. The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in Asian and African art history and archaeology, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students studying the Music, Film and Media of Asia, Africa and the Middle East in historical and contemporary contexts. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of Asia and Africa. A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research. Structure Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department listed below. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from MA options offered by other SOAS departments, also listed below. Students must complete the Dissertation in Art and Archaeology (15PARC999). Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught courses in the first year, and one taught course and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught course in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It is submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it. Compulsory Dissertation in Art and Archaeology - 15PARC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year History of Art and Archaeology Options Approaches to Critical Interpretation & Aesthetic Theories - 15PARC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arab Painting - 15PARH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Architectural Boundaries and the Body - 15PARH063 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Art and Architecture of the Fatimids - 15PARH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Art and Architecture of the Early Ottomans and the Beyliks (13-15th centuries) - 15PARH068 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Art and Archaeology of the Silk Road - 15PARC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arts of Koryo and Chosen Korea - 15PARH059 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Arts of Modern and Contemporary China (since 1800) - 15PARH055 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Arts of the Tamil Temple - 15PARH067 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route - 15PARH057 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Ceramics in Chinese Culture: 10th - 18th Centuries - 15PARH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Chinese Porcelain: Trade, Transfer and Reception - 15PARH064 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum - 15PARH069 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Contemporary Art and the Global - 15PARH085 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Critical Themes in Tibetan Art - 15PARH074 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Curating Cultures - 15PARH079 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Diaspora Contexts and Visual Culture - 15PARH042 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 (En)gendering Southeast Asia: Aesthetics and Politics of Sexual Difference - 15PARH084 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia - 15PARH073 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islam and the West: Artistic and Cultural Contacts - 15PARH034 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic Archaeology - 15PARH081 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic Art and Architecture of Eastern Mediterranean of the Period of the Crusades (11th-14th centuries) - 15PARH080 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic Art & Architecture of Medieval Anatolia and the South Caucasus (11-13th centuries) - 15PARH070 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in Contemporary Southeast Asian Art - 15PARH083 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern and Contemporary Arts in Africa - 15PARH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern and Contemporary Korean Art - 15PARH060 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Monuments and sculpture of Angkor - 15PARH071 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Morocco and the Horizons of Visibility - 15PARH065 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Museums, Anthropology and the Arts of Asia and Africa - 15PARH072 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Photography and the Image in Africa - 15PARH082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Painting and Visual Culture in China - 15PARC043 (1.0 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Persian Painting - 15PARH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Popular Practice in the Edo Period Arts - 15PARH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Representing Conflict: A Cross-Cultural and Inter Disciplinary Approach - 15PARH039 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea - 15PARH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Shogunal Iconography in the Edo Period - 15PARH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History - 15PARH076 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Indian Temple - 15PARC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context - 15PARH075 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Visual Arts of Dynastic China (to 1800) - 15PARH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Options in Other Departments Anthropology Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) History Encountering the Other: the Middle East during the Crusading Period - 15PHIH037 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Histories of Ethnicity and Conflict in South East Asia 1 - Making States and Building Nations - 15PHIH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Histories of Ethnicity and Conflict in South East Asia 2 - Non-National Perspectives - 15PHIH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Japanese Modernity I - 15PHIH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Modernity II - 15PHIH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Knowledge and Power in Early Modern China - 15PHIH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Nationhood and Competing Identities in Modern China - 15PHIH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Outsiders in Medieval Middle Eastern Societies: Minorities, Social Outcasts and Foreigners - 15PHIH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Study of Religions Avestan I - 15PSRC033 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Buddhism in Tibet - 15PSRH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Basic Pali (PG) - 15PSRC176 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Buddhist Meditation in India and Tibet - 15PSRC172 (1 Unit) - Full Year Chinese Religious Texts: A Reading Seminar - 15PSRH038 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 East Asian Buddhist Thought - 15PSRH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Eastern and Orthodox Christianity - 15PSRC055 (1 Unit) - Full Year Features of Buddhist Monasticism - 15PSRH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 History and Doctrines of Indian Buddhism - 15PSRC059 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Imag(in)ing Buddhahood in South Asia (1) - 15PARH078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Imag(in)ing Buddhahood in South Asia (2) - 15PSRH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Mystical Traditions - 15PSRC068 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Modern Bengal: the Evolution of Bengali Culture and Society from 1690 to the Present Day (MA) - 15PSAC289 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Non-Violence in Jain Scriptures, Philosophy and Law - 15PSRC062 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Pahlavi Language - 15PSRC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Religious Practice in Japan: Texts, Rituals and Believers - 15PSRC071 (1 Unit) - Full Year The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia - 15PSRH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 The Origins and Development of Yoga in Ancient India - 15PSRC173 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory and Method in the Study of Religion - 15PSRC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Zoroastrianism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives - 15PSRC052 (1 Unit) - Full Year Media Studies Communication, Culture and Politics in the Middle East: Theoretical and Analytical Approaches - 15PMSC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year Media Spectacle and Urban Space in East Asia - 15PMSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Mediated Culture in the Middle East: Politics and Communications - 15PMSH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Music Aspects of Music and Religion in South East Asia - 15PMUH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Atlantic Africa: (P)Layers of Mediation in African Popular Music (PG) - 15PMUC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Central Asian Music - 15PMUH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Music in Selected Regions of Africa: Contexts and Structures - 15PMUC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Music, Nation and Conflict in Jerusalem - 15PMUH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Music, Place and Politics in Cuba - 15PMUH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Popular and Fusion Music in South East Asia (PG) - 15PMUH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Raga: concept and practice (PG) - 15PMUH020 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Africa African Philosophy (PG) - 15PAFH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Afrophone Philosophies (PG) - 15PAFH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Amharic 1 (PG) - 15PAFC130 (1 Unit) - Full Year Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Curating Africa: African Film and Video in the Age of Festivals - 15PAFH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Hausa 1 (PG) - 15PAFC136 (1 Unit) - Full Year Literatures in African languages - 15PAFC124 (1 Unit) - Full Year Somali 1 (PG) - 15PAFC132 (1 Unit) - Full Year Swahili 1 (PG) - 15PAFC140 (1 Unit) - Full Year The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Travelling Africa: Writing the Cape to Cairo - 15PAFC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Visual Cultures in South Africa: Past and Present - 15PAFC143 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Yoruba 1 (PG) - 15PAFC134 (1 Unit) - Full Year Zulu 1 (PG) - 15PAFC128 (1 Unit) - Full Year China and Asia Intensive Elementary Tibetan (PG) - 15PCHC018 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Introduction to Classical Literary Tibetan (Masters) - 15PEAC020 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Special Course in Chinese 1 (PG) - 15PCHC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 2 (PG) - 15PCHC011 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 3 (PG) - 15PCHC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 4 (PG) - 15PCHC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese: Reading Classical and Literary Chinese (PG) - 15PCHC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year Traditional Chinese Language and Literature - 15PCHC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Japan and Korea Basic Japanese 1 (PG) - 15PJKC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Basic Korean (PG) - 15PJKC022 (1 Unit) - Full Year Cinema, Nation and the Transcultural - 15PJKC023 (1 Unit) - Full Year Japanese Television since 1953 - 15PJKC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Japanese Traditional Drama (Masters) - 15PEAH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Literary Traditions and Culture of Korea (Masters) - 15PJKH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Topics in Modern Korean History - 15PEAC059 (1 Unit) - Full Year Topics in the History of Traditional Korea - 15PEAC053 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Trajectories of Modernity in 20th Century Korean Literature (Masters) - 15PJKH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Near & Middle East Arabic 2 (PG) - 15PNMC382 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arabic 300 (Postgraduate) - 15PNMC390 (1 unit - 45 cats Unit) Arabic 4 (PG) - 15PNMC391 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arabic Poetry and Criticism - 15PNMC048 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Arabic Women's Writing: Theories and Practices - 15PNMC411 (1 Unit) - Full Year Classical Ottoman Literature (Masters) - 15PNMC385 (1 Unit) - Full Year Classical Persian Poetry (Masters) - 15PNMC401 (1 Unit) - Full Year Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies I: History and Politics - 15PNMH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies II: Culture and Society - 15PNMH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Elementary Written Persian - 15PNMC387 (1 Unit) - Full Year Elementary Persian Texts (PG) - 15PNMC384 (1 Unit) - Full Year Elementary Written Turkish - 15PNMC386 (1 Unit) - Full Year Film and Society in the Middle East - 15PNMC230 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Intensive Turkish Language (PG) - 15PNMC395 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intermediate Standard Modern Arabic - 15PNMC407 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intermediate Modern Turkish Language (PG) - 15PNMC383 (1 Unit) - Full Year Introduction to Standard Modern Arabic - 15PNMC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Iran: History, Culture, Politics - 15PNMC405 (1 Unit) - Full Year Israel, the Arab World and the Palestinians - 15PNMC038 (1 Unit) - Full Year Medieval Arabic Thought: the Philosophical and Theological Traditions - 15PNMC388 (1 Unit) - Full Year New Cinemas of Turkey - 15PNMH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Ottoman Turkish Language (PG) - 15PNMC397 (1 Unit) - Full Year Persian Language 2 (PG) - 15PNMC033 (1 Unit) - Full Year Reading Classical Arabic Historians: Themes and Trends in Islamic Historiography - 15PNMC378 (1 Unit) - Full Year South Asia Bengali Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC303 (1 Unit) - Full Year Bengali Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC304 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya - 15PSAC291 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hindi Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC296 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hindi Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC295 (1 Unit) - Full Year Hindi Language 3 (PG) - 15PSAC297 (1 Unit) - Full Year Imagining Pakistan: culture, politics, gender (MA) - 15PSAC313 (1 Unit) - Full Year Indian Cinema: Its History and Social Context - 15PSAH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Indian Cinema: Key Issues - 15PSAH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Literature & Colonialism in North India (Masters) - 15PSAH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Bengal: the Evolution of Bengali Culture and Society from 1690 to the Present Day (MA) - 15PSAC289 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Nepali Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC298 (1 Unit) - Full Year Nepali Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC299 (1 Unit) - Full Year Sanskrit Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC294 (1 Unit) - Full Year Sanskrit Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC306 (1 Unit) - Full Year The Politics of Culture in Contemporary South Asia - 15PSAC314 (1 Unit) - Full Year Urdu Language 1 (PG) - 15PSAC300 (1 Unit) - Full Year Urdu Language 2 (PG) - 15PSAC301 (1 Unit) - Full Year South and South East Asia Burmese Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC039 (1 Unit) - Full Year Burmese Language 2 (Postgraduate) - 15PSEC045 (1 Unit Unit) Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indonesian Language 2 (PG) - 15PSEC033 (1 Unit) - Full Year Indonesian Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Jawi and the Malay Manuscript Tradition (Masters) - 15PSEH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Khmer (Cambodian) Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC043 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Thai Language 2 (PG) - 15PSEC041 (1 Unit) - Full Year Vietnamese Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC036 (1 Unit) - Full Year Thai Language 1 (PG) - 15PSEC040 (1 Unit) - Full Year Vietnamese Language 2 (PG) - 15PSEC037 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning Teaching Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory. In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London. Assessment For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Asia House Bonhams British Museum Christie's Hong Kong Design Museum Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum Hong Kong Museum Of Art India Foundation For The Arts Museum of East Asian Art National Gallery National Museum of Singapore People Projects Culture & Change Schoeni Art Gallery Sotheby's Taiwan Embassy The Alliance for Global Education The British Embassy The Chester Beatty Library The National Museum Of Korea The Royal Collection Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Manager of Communications Culture Programme Coordinator Research Assistant Social Anthropology Lecturer Specialist - Indian Art Architect Art Historian Development Specialist Archivist Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager Creative Director Organisational Consultant Travel writer Art Collector Chinese Painting Specialist Professor of Silk Road History Rights and Reproductions Officer Public Education Coordinator Senior Curator of Photographs A Student's Perspective "The insight provided, knowledge delivered and understanding transmitted during lectures, seminars and conferences at SOAS is impressive and requires real personal involvement in the topics." Xavier Fournier [-]

MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Students consider a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, exploring their specificity and the links between them, in historical and contemporary periods. In many parts of East Asia archaeological evidence is key to understanding early societies. The programme therefore relates excavated materials to the history of art. [+]

MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia Duration: One year (full-time). Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: The normal qualification for admission to the MA programme is an upper second class honours degree. Other qualifications, however, may be acceptable and the Department welcomes mature students. Students taking the MA degree may or may not have previous experience of our subjects. While knowledge of a relevant Asian or African language is not a requirement, for some courses it is an advantage for admission (see individual course descriptions for details). It is possible to include an element of language training within the MA programme by taking an Asian or African language as one of the two ‘minor’ courses. This option may be particularly desirable for those intending to progress to the PhD, who do not already have the necessary language skills. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Students consider a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, exploring their specificity and the links between them, in historical and contemporary periods. In many parts of East Asia archaeological evidence is key to understanding early societies. The programme therefore relates excavated materials to the history of art. The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of East Asia. A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research. This MA can also be pursued over a two-year period combined with intensive language study in Japanese or Korean. Structure Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department related to Art and Archaeology of East Asia listed below. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from the other MA modules in the department or from MA options offered by other SOAS departments, also listed below. Students must complete the Dissertation in History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia (15PARC996). Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught modules in the first year, and one taught module and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught module in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it. Compulsory Dissertation in History of Art and Archaeology: History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia - 15PARC996 (1 Unit) - Full Year Options in History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia Art and Archaeology of the Silk Road - 15PARC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arts of Koryo and Chosen Korea - 15PARH059 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Arts of Modern and Contemporary China (since 1800) - 15PARH055 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Ceramics in Chinese Culture: 10th - 18th Centuries - 15PARH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Chinese Porcelain: Trade, Transfer and Reception - 15PARH064 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Critical Themes in Tibetan Art - 15PARH074 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern and Contemporary Korean Art - 15PARH060 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Painting and Visual Culture in China - 15PARC043 (1.0 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Popular Practice in the Edo Period Arts - 15PARH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea - 15PARH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Shogunal Iconography in the Edo Period - 15PARH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context - 15PARH075 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Visual Arts of Dynastic China (to 1800) - 15PARH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Other Options in the History of Art and Archaeology Approaches to Critical Interpretation & Aesthetic Theories - 15PARC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arab Painting - 15PARH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Architectural Boundaries and the Body - 15PARH063 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Art and Architecture of the Early Ottomans and the Beyliks (13-15th centuries) - 15PARH068 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Art and Architecture of the Fatimids - 15PARH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Arts of the Tamil Temple - 15PARH067 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route - 15PARH057 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum - 15PARH069 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Diaspora Contexts and Visual Culture - 15PARH042 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia - 15PARH073 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Imag(in)ing Buddhahood in South Asia (1) - 15PARH078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islam and the West: Artistic and Cultural Contacts - 15PARH034 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic Archaeology - 15PARH081 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic Art and Architecture of Eastern Mediterranean of the Period of the Crusades (11th-14th centuries) - 15PARH080 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic Art & Architecture of Medieval Anatolia and the South Caucasus (11-13th centuries) - 15PARH070 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Issues in Contemporary Southeast Asian Art - 15PARH083 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern and Contemporary Arts in Africa - 15PARH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Monuments and sculpture of Angkor - 15PARH071 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Morocco and the Horizons of Visibility - 15PARH065 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Museums, Anthropology and the Arts of Asia and Africa - 15PARH072 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Painting and Visual Culture in China - 15PARC043 (1.0 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Persian Painting - 15PARH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Photography and the Image in Africa - 15PARH082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Representing Conflict: A Cross-Cultural and Inter Disciplinary Approach - 15PARH039 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea - 15PARH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Shogunal Iconography in the Edo Period - 15PARH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History - 15PARH076 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Indian Temple - 15PARC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context - 15PARH075 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Options in Other Departments Anthropology Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) History Japanese Modernity I - 15PHIH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Modernity II - 15PHIH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Knowledge and Power in Early Modern China - 15PHIH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Nationhood and Competing Identities in Modern China - 15PHIH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Media Studies Media Spectacle and Urban Space in East Asia - 15PMSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Music Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Study of Religions Buddhism in Tibet - 15PSRH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Buddhist Meditation in India and Tibet - 15PSRC172 (1 Unit) - Full Year Chinese Religious Texts: A Reading Seminar - 15PSRH038 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 East Asian Buddhist Thought - 15PSRH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Features of Buddhist Monasticism - 15PSRH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Imag(in)ing Buddhahood in South Asia (1) - 15PARH078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Imag(in)ing Buddhahood in South Asia (2) - 15PSRH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Mystical Traditions - 15PSRC068 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Religious Practice in Japan: Texts, Rituals and Believers - 15PSRC071 (1 Unit) - Full Year The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia - 15PSRH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Theory and Method in the Study of Religion - 15PSRC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 China and Asia Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Film from Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora - 15PCHH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Traditional Chinese Language and Literature - 15PCHC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Special Course in Chinese 1 (PG) - 15PCHC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 2 (PG) - 15PCHC011 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 3 (PG) - 15PCHC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese 4 (PG) - 15PCHC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Special Course in Chinese: Reading Classical and Literary Chinese (PG) - 15PCHC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year Japan and Korea Basic Japanese 1 (PG) - 15PJKC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Basic Korean (PG) - 15PJKC022 (1 Unit) - Full Year Cinema, Nation and the Transcultural - 15PJKC023 (1 Unit) - Full Year Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Japanese Television since 1953 - 15PJKC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Japanese Transnational Cinema: From Kurosawa to Asia Extreme and Studio Ghibli - 15PJKH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Topics in Modern Korean History - 15PEAC059 (1 Unit) - Full Year Topics in the History of Traditional Korea - 15PEAC053 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Trajectories of Modernity in 20th Century Korean Literature (Masters) - 15PJKH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Trajectories of Modernity in 20th Century Korean Literature (Masters) - 15PJKH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Teaching & Learning Teaching Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory. In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London. Assessment For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Asia House Bonhams British Museum Christie's Hong Kong Design Museum Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum Hong Kong Museum Of Art India Foundation For The Arts Museum of East Asian Art National Gallery National Museum of Singapore People Projects Culture & Change Schoeni Art Gallery Sotheby's Taiwan Embassy The Alliance for Global Education The British Embassy The Chester Beatty Library The National Museum Of Korea The Royal Collection Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Manager of Communications Culture Programme Coordinator Research Assistant Social Anthropology Lecturer Specialist - Indian Art Architect Art Historian Development Specialist Archivist Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager Creative Director Organisational Consultant Travel writer Art Collector Chinese Painting Specialist Professor of Silk Road History Rights and Reproductions Officer Public Education Coordinator Senior Curator of Photographs A Student's Perspective "When I heard about SOAS I immediately knew it was the school for me. An institution like SOAS is the ideal platform for students who want to learn a language and gain insight into a culture. It is also a leading school in Tibetan studies." Beatriz Cifuentes [-]

MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia and Intensive Language

Campus Full time Part time 2 - 4  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Students study the arts of China, Korea and Japan, exploring a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, in historical and contemporary periods. Instruction in the language of their choice is provided by teachers in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. By the end of the programme, which includes a summer language school abroad, students have received sufficient instruction to reach near-proficiency in the language. [+]

MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia and Intensive Language Duration: Two years (full-time). Four years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: The normal qualification for admission to the MA programme is an upper second class honours degree. Other qualifications, however, may be acceptable and the Department welcomes mature students. Students taking the MA degree may or may not have previous experience of our subjects. The Japanese pathway offers beginner and intermediate entry levels. For further information please see the webpage for the [MA....and Intensive Language Japanese] in the pages of the Japan and Korea department. The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (ak49@soas.ac.uk). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1. Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Students study the arts of China, Korea and Japan, exploring a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, in historical and contemporary periods. Instruction in the language of their choice is provided by teachers in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. By the end of the programme, which includes a summer language school abroad, students have received sufficient instruction to reach near-proficiency in the language. The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media, as well as the expertise of specialist language teachers. A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research. Structure Students take two intensive language units and one East Asian History of Art and Archaeology unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they take one intensive language unit in their second year and two East Asian History of Art and Archaeology units. The dissertation is written on East Asian History of Art and Archaeology and submitted in September of year 2. Teaching & Learning Teaching Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory. In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London. Assessment For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September of year 2. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Asia House Bonhams British Museum Christie's Hong Kong Design Museum Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum Hong Kong Museum Of Art India Foundation For The Arts Museum of East Asian Art National Gallery National Museum of Singapore People Projects Culture & Change Schoeni Art Gallery Sotheby's Taiwan Embassy The Alliance for Global Education The British Embassy The Chester Beatty Library The National Museum Of Korea The Royal Collection Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Manager of Communications Culture Programme Coordinator Research Assistant Social Anthropology Lecturer Specialist - Indian Art Architect Art Historian Development Specialist Archivist Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager Creative Director Organisational Consultant Travel writer Art Collector Chinese Painting Specialist Professor of Silk Road History Rights and Reproductions Officer Public Education Coordinator Senior Curator of Photographs A Student's Perspective "The public transport in London is just great as it is easy to get around and also to get to other cities in the UK. The beautiful cities Cambridge and Oxford are basically around the corner and definitely worth visiting and many other nice British cities and places are also easy to get to from London." Katja Utz, University of Heidelberg [-]

MA History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. It offers students an unmatched opportunity to study particular regions or categories of art, including Fatimid art; the architecture and urbanism of Morocco; Arab, Persian and Turkish painting; the calligraphy and illumination of the Qur'an; Mamluk art and architecture; the arts and architecture of the Ottomans in Turkey and the Balkans; and the material culture of western Iran. Archaeological issues of the Islamic Middle East are also considered. [+]

MA History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East Duration: One year (full-time). Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: The normal qualification for admission to the MA programme is an upper second class honours degree. Other qualifications, however, may be acceptable and the Department welcomes mature students. Students taking the MA degree may or may not have previous experience of our subjects. While knowledge of a relevant Asian or African language is not a requirement, for some courses it is an advantage for admission (see individual course descriptions for details). It is possible to include an element of language training within the MA programme by taking an Asian or African language as one of the two ‘minor’ courses. This option may be particularly desirable for those intending to progress to the PhD, who do not already have the necessary language skills. Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. It offers students an unmatched opportunity to study particular regions or categories of art, including Fatimid art; the architecture and urbanism of Morocco; Arab, Persian and Turkish painting; the calligraphy and illumination of the Qur'an; Mamluk art and architecture; the arts and architecture of the Ottomans in Turkey and the Balkans; and the material culture of western Iran. Archaeological issues of the Islamic Middle East are also considered. In addition, the degree engages with trans-regional topics that extend beyond the Middle East, such as cultural and artistic relationships between the Islamic Middle East and Europe. Students can decide to study complementary courses on non-Islamic traditions of the Middle East and/or the Islamic traditions of other regions. The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of the Islamic Middle East, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as Music, Film and Media in the Middle East and the wider Islamic world. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of the Middle East. A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research. Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department related to History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East listed below. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from the other MA modules in the department or from MA options offered by other SOAS departments, also listed below. Students must complete the Dissertation in History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East (15PARC997). Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught modules in the first year, and one taught module and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught module in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it. Compulsory Dissertation in History of Art and Archaeology: History of Art and Archaeology of Islamic Middle East - 15PARC997 (1 Unit) - Full Year Options in History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East Approaches to Critical Interpretation & Aesthetic Theories - 15PARC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arab Painting - 15PARH054 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Architectural Boundaries and the Body - 15PARH063 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Art and Architecture of the Fatimids - 15PARH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Art and Architecture of the Early Ottomans and the Beyliks (13-15th centuries) - 15PARH068 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islam and the West: Artistic and Cultural Contacts - 15PARH034 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic Art and Architecture of Eastern Mediterranean of the Period of the Crusades (11th-14th centuries) - 15PARH080 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Islamic Art & Architecture of Medieval Anatolia and the South Caucasus (11-13th centuries) - 15PARH070 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Islamic Archaeology - 15PARH081 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia - 15PARH073 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Morocco and the Horizons of Visibility - 15PARH065 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Persian Painting - 15PARH053 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Other Options in the History of Art and Archaeology Architectural Boundaries and the Body - 15PARH063 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Art and Archaeology of the Silk Road - 15PARC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arts of Koryo and Chosen Korea - 15PARH059 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Arts of the Tamil Temple - 15PARH067 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Arts of Modern and Contemporary China (since 1800) - 15PARH055 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route - 15PARH057 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Ceramics in Chinese Culture: 10th - 18th Centuries - 15PARH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Chinese Porcelain: Trade, Transfer and Reception - 15PARH064 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum - 15PARH069 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Critical Themes in Tibetan Art - 15PARH074 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Diaspora Contexts and Visual Culture - 15PARH042 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia - 15PARH073 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Imag(in)ing Buddhahood in South Asia (1) - 15PARH078 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Issues in Contemporary Southeast Asian Art - 15PARH083 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern and Contemporary Arts in Africa - 15PARH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern and Contemporary Korean Art - 15PARH060 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Monuments and sculpture of Angkor - 15PARH071 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Museums, Anthropology and the Arts of Asia and Africa - 15PARH072 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Painting and Visual Culture in China - 15PARC043 (1.0 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Photography and the Image in Africa - 15PARH082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Popular Practice in the Edo Period Arts - 15PARH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Representing Conflict: A Cross-Cultural and Inter Disciplinary Approach - 15PARH039 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea - 15PARH056 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Shogunal Iconography in the Edo Period - 15PARH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Indian Temple - 15PARC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context - 15PARH075 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Visual Arts of Dynastic China (to 1800) - 15PARH051 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Options in Other Departments Anthropology Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) History Encountering the Other: the Middle East during the Crusading Period - 15PHIH037 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Outsiders in Medieval Middle Eastern Societies: Minorities, Social Outcasts and Foreigners - 15PHIH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Media Studies Communication, Culture and Politics in the Middle East: Theoretical and Analytical Approaches - 15PMSC005 (1 Unit) - Full Year Mediated Culture in the Middle East: Politics and Communications - 15PMSH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Study of Religions Avestan I - 15PSRC033 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Eastern and Orthodox Christianity - 15PSRC055 (1 Unit) - Full Year Mystical Traditions - 15PSRC068 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Pahlavi Language - 15PSRC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory and Method in the Study of Religion - 15PSRC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Zoroastrianism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives - 15PSRC052 (1 Unit) - Full Year Music Central Asian Music - 15PMUH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Music, Nation and Conflict in Jerusalem - 15PMUH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Near & Middle East Arabic 2 (PG) - 15PNMC382 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arabic 300 (Postgraduate) - 15PNMC390 (1 unit - 45 cats Unit) Arabic 4 (PG) - 15PNMC391 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arabic Poetry and Criticism - 15PNMC048 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Arabic Women's Writing: Theories and Practices - 15PNMC411 (1 Unit) - Full Year Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies I: History and Politics - 15PNMH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Critical Perspectives on Palestine Studies II: Culture and Society - 15PNMH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Elementary Persian Texts (PG) - 15PNMC384 (1 Unit) - Full Year Elementary Written Persian - 15PNMC387 (1 Unit) - Full Year Elementary Written Turkish - 15PNMC386 (1 Unit) - Full Year Film and Society in the Middle East - 15PNMC230 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Intensive Turkish Language (PG) - 15PNMC395 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intermediate Modern Turkish Language (PG) - 15PNMC383 (1 Unit) - Full Year Intermediate Standard Modern Arabic - 15PNMC407 (1 Unit) - Full Year Introduction to Standard Modern Arabic - 15PNMC032 (1 Unit) - Full Year Iran: History, Culture, Politics - 15PNMC405 (1 Unit) - Full Year Israel, the Arab World and the Palestinians - 15PNMC038 (1 Unit) - Full Year New Cinemas of Turkey - 15PNMH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Persian for Readers of Arabic Script (PG) - 15PNMC422 (1 Unit) - Full Year Persian Language 2 (PG) - 15PNMC033 (1 Unit) - Full Year Persian Language 3 (PG) - 15PNMC408 (1 Unit) - Full Year Teaching & Learning Teaching Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory. In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London. Assessment For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Asia House Bonhams British Museum Christie's Hong Kong Design Museum Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum Hong Kong Museum Of Art India Foundation For The Arts Museum of East Asian Art National Gallery National Museum of Singapore People Projects Culture & Change Schoeni Art Gallery Sotheby's Taiwan Embassy The Alliance for Global Education The British Embassy The Chester Beatty Library The National Museum Of Korea The Royal Collection Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Manager of Communications Culture Programme Coordinator Research Assistant Social Anthropology Lecturer Specialist - Indian Art Architect Art Historian Development Specialist Archivist Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager Creative Director Organisational Consultant Travel writer Art Collector Chinese Painting Specialist Professor of Silk Road History Rights and Reproductions Officer Public Education Coordinator Senior Curator of Photographs A Student's Perspective "Studying Islamic Art History at SOAS has been one of the most engrossing, pleasurable and rewarding pursuits I have undertaken.The SOAS academics I encountered are exemplary. Their scholarship, first hand experiences and enthralling anecdotes brought their subjects to life. Within this rich and rigorous environment, also supported by access to other SOAS departments and the numerous co-curricular resources available in London, it is inevitable that students strive for excellence. " Elizabeth Kelly [-]

MA in Chinese Law

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Chinese Law allows students to study Chinese law in depth, looking at areas such as foundations of Chinese Law, Commerce and Human Rights. [+]

MA in Chinese Law Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second class honours preferably in a related discipline Start of programme: September intake only The MA in Chinese Law allows students to study Chinese law in depth, looking at areas such as foundations of Chinese Law, Commerce and Human Rights. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners. Structure To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Chinese Law specialisation: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 (1 Unit) Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit) Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit) Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit) Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit) Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a unique British university, as it adopts a global view, but specialises in Asia, Africa and the Middle East: something it is very good at. This is evident in the passion and expertise of the teachers, the interests of the students and the many colourful exhibitions and cultural events regularly hosted here." Nunons Tagoe-Borllons [-]

MA in Cultural Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The aim of the programme is to offer grounding in the theories on Cultural Studies which draws on Marxism, Structuralism, Post-Structuralism, Post-Marxism, Feminism, and Post-Modernism and their use, application and adaption in the cross-cultural contexts of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. [+]

MA in Cultural Studies Duration: Full time - 1 year Part time - 2 or 3 years Minimum Entry Requirements: Equivalent of a UK 2:1 degree Start of programme: September intake only The aim of the programme is to offer grounding in the theories on Cultural Studies which draws on Marxism, Structuralism, Post-Structuralism, Post-Marxism, Feminism, and Post-Modernism and their use, application and adaption in the cross-cultural contexts of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. It provides an examination of the main historical concepts in Western culture such as ideology, power, class, identity, race, nation, subjectivity, representation, and memory and how these are challenged by scholars working in non-Western cultures of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The aim is to explore the different and plural cultural histories and memories of these contexts to which Cultural Studies must adapt. Theoretical paradigms covered will reflect on issues of class, ‘race’, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, representation and religion. The course will investigate central questions of epistemology and methodology in relation to the application of Cultural Studies theories in non-Western contexts. The programme is theory and practice based and therefore, it draws on case studies from a diversity of cultural practices, genres and contexts to elucidate complex theoretical concepts and challenge their limitations and/or validity in the context of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. The programme aims to equip students with sufficient knowledge to understand and evaluate the way in which Cultural Studies theories and methods are used in cross-cultural contexts and hence develop analytic skills for undertaking their own research projects. The Programme will consist of modules valued at 3 units and a dissertation of 10,000 words. Full-time students will be allowed to enrol for four units during term one (part-time students two or three), if one of the units is a language acquisition unit. At the end of term one they will have to withdraw from one unit, leaving units to the value of three (pro rata for part-time students) and a dissertation. Core Courses Cultural studies theories and the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PCSC001 (1 Unit) - Full Year Dissertation in Cultural Studies - 15PCSC999 (1 Unit) - Full Year Optional Courses Choose modules to the value of two units from the Lists below. No more than 1 unit can be taken from Group B or C. Group A (From the Faculty of Languages and Cultures) Turkey:Continuity and Change - 15PNMC377 (1 Unit) - Full Year Selected Topics in 20th Century Turkish Literature - 15PNMC374 (1 Unit) - Full Year Arabic Women's Writing: Theories and Practices - 15PNMC411 (1 Unit) - Full Year Years of Radical change: South Korean cinema from the 'New Wave' to the new millenium - 15PJKH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Curating Africa: African Film and Video in the Age of Festivals - 15PAFH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Travelling Africa: Writing the Cape to Cairo - 15PAFC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Japanese Traditional Drama (Masters) - 15PEAH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Japanese Literature (Masters) - 15PEAH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Film from Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora - 15PCHH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Traditional Chinese Literature in Translation - 15PCHC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Literatures in African languages - 15PAFC124 (1 Unit) - Full Year Literatures of South Asia - 15PSAC284 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 The Politics of Culture in Contemporary South Asia - 15PSAC314 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Arabic Literature and the West - 15PNMC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Film and Society in the Middle East - 15PNMC230 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Post-crisis Thai Cinema (1997-2007) - 15PSEH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 (Post) Colonialism and Otherness in South East Asia on Screen - 15PSEH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 English Literatures of South East Asia - 15PSEH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Realism and Magical Realism in the Afrophone Novel (PG) - 15PAFC146 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Japanese Television since 1953 - 15PJKC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian Cinema: Its History and Social Context - 15PSAH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Indian Cinema: Key Issues - 15PSAH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indonesia on Screen(PG) - 15PSEH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Vietnam on Screen (PG) - 15PSEH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Under Western Eyes: European Writings on South East Asia (PG) - 15PSEH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Directed Readings in a South East Asian Language - 15PSEH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Identity and Language in Hebrew Literature - 15PNMC412 (1 Unit) - Full Year Translating Cultures - 15PJKC029 (1 Unit) - Full Year Research Methods In Translation Studies - 15PLIH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Group A (From the Faculty of Arts and Humanities) Department of Anthropology and Sociology Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 African and Asian Cultures in Britain - 15PANH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Centre for Media and Film Studies The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use - 15PMSH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Transnational Communities and Diasporic Media:Networking, Connectivity, Identity - 15PMSH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Japanese Transnational Cinema: From Kurosawa to Asia Extreme and Studio Ghibli - 15PJKH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Mediated Culture in the Middle East: Politics and Communications - 15PMSH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International Political Communication - 15PMSH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Studies in Global Media and Post-National Communication - 15PMSH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Department of Music Atlantic Africa: (P)Layers of Mediation in African Popular Music (PG) - 15PMUC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender and Music (MMus) - 15PMUH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Department of the Study of Religions Critical Theory and the Study of Religions - 15PSRC037 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Myth and Mythmaking - 15PSRC164 (1.0 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Muslim Britain: Perspectives and Realities - 15PSRC158 (1 Unit) - Full Year Department of History Histories of Ethnicity and Conflict in South East Asia 1 - Making States and Building Nations - 15PHIH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Histories of Ethnicity and Conflict in South East Asia 2 - Non-National Perspectives - 15PHIH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Social and Cultural Transformations in Southern Africa Since 1945 - 15PHIH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 The End of Empire in the Middle East & the Balkans - 15PHIC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year Japanese Modernity I - 15PHIH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Modernity II - 15PHIH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Knowledge and Power in Early Modern China - 15PHIH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Nationhood and Competing Identities in Modern China - 15PHIH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Department of Art and Archaeology Modern and Contemporary Arts in Africa - 15PARH048 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Diaspora Contexts and Visual Culture - 15PARH042 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Representing Conflict: A Cross-Cultural and Inter Disciplinary Approach - 15PARH039 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Islam and the West: Artistic and Cultural Contacts - 15PARH034 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Painting and Visual Culture in China - 15PARC043 (1.0 Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 Group B One African or Asian PG Language unit or one Language-based MA Literature/Film/Media unit may be included as one of the options. See the relevant language department website for course lists. Group C One theory unit may be included as an option. Gender theory and the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East - 15PGNC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Postcolonial Theory and Practice - 15PCSC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Destinations A postgraduate degree in Cultural Studies from SOAS provides its students with expertise in non-European cultures, in-depth regional knowledge, and strong research and critical analysis skills. As well as subject expertise, Postgraduate students are equipped with the transferable skills needed to continue in research as well as the skills needed to enable them to find professional careers in the private and public sectors. These include familiarity with methods of research; the ability to absorb and analyse large quantities of information; organisational skills. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. A Student's Perspective "I truly appreciate and highly recommend the critical thrust of the course, the outstanding instruction and guidance of the lecturers/tutors, and the multicultural make-up of the class." Neslie Carol Tan [-]

MA in Dispute and Conflict Resolution

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Dispute Resolution and Conflict allows students to study the full spectrum of legal methods of solving disputes and managing conflicts, taking a broad view of conflict and law, and examining both the local, regional and international areas, including international tribunals and post-conflict reconciliation and reconstruction. [+]

MA in Dispute and Conflict Resolution Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second class honours preferably in a related discipline Start of programme: September intake only The MA in Dispute Resolution and Conflict allows students to study the full spectrum of legal methods of solving disputes and managing conflicts, taking a broad view of conflict and law, and examining both the local, regional and international areas, including international tribunals and post-conflict reconciliation and reconstruction. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners. Structure To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit) International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit) Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit) Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit) Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit) International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit) Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals- 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit) The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "Never, have I heard or seen the world so at peace, I mean only at SOAS will you see at one and the same time debates and events in support of both Israel and Palestine happening side by side harmoniously." Rehana Ahmed [-]

MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Environmental law is one of the most challenging fields that has grown very rapidly over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of both domestic and international law. [+]

MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development Duration: One year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only). Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second class honours preferably in a related discipline Start of programme: September intake only The MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Environmental law is one of the most challenging fields that has grown very rapidly over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of both domestic and international law. At SOAS, we understand the environment in a broad sense which includes not only environmental issues strictly speaking but also all the links that they have with other areas such as natural resources, human rights, economic development trade or intellectual property rights. The SOAS degree offers a distinct mix of modules that covers all the main areas of environmental law in their international and national dimensions. The international and global nature of many environmental issues makes the international law component a key part of the MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development. We offer all the general topics that make up the core of international environmental law. Additionally, we focus specifically on the North-South dimension of international environmental issues given the key role this plays in most international environmental negotiations. The MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development specifically seeks to put international environmental law in its national context and examines the broad legal frameworks negotiated at the international level in the context of their implementation in selected countries of the South. It thus provides a much more grounded context to the study of environmental law. Further, we also study the legal regimes of individual countries of the South to provide much more specific analysis of the discipline at the level of its implementation in specific contexts. The MA in Environmental Law and Sustainable Development gives specific emphasis to different regions of the South, including South Asia, China and sub-Saharan Africa. Structure To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Environmental Law and Sustainable Development specialisation: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Climate Change and Energy Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit) Law, Environment and Sustainable Development in a Global Context - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit) Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit) Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Water and Development: Conflict and Governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit) Water Law: Justice and Governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit) Examples of non-Law module options: Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific - 15PFFH011 (0.5 Unit) Global Energy & Climate Policy - 15PFFC017 (1 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "SOAS' location - in the heart of London, one of the world's great cities - made it a great base from which to explore surrounding areas. I spent much of my time, especially weekends, exploring London's diverse neighborhoods, its epic museums and delicious food markets." Hirsh Jain, Harvard University, Law School [-]

MA in Global Cinemas and the Transcultural

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Global Cinemas and the Transcultural offers students the unique opportunity to study in-depth regional cinemas outside the now standard research topographies, both geographical and theoretical, of mainstream cinema studies, so opening up avenues for advanced research in areas and methodologies as yet untapped. [+]

MA in Global Cinemas and the Transcultural Duration: 1 Year Full Time, 2 or 3 Years Part Time Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) Venue: Russell Square: College Buildings Start of programme: September Mode of Attendance: Full-time The MA in Global Cinemas and the Transcultural offers students the unique opportunity to study in-depth regional cinemas outside the now standard research topographies, both geographical and theoretical, of mainstream cinema studies, so opening up avenues for advanced research in areas and methodologies as yet untapped. Alternatively, it provides an avenue of study for those simply wishing to obtain a post-graduate qualification in Cinema Studies without being confined to a European- and/or American-centric world-view.The degree is designed around a compulsory core module, Cinema, Nation and the Transcultural, that simultaneously challenges existing critical paradigms defining 'national cinema' in the simplistic terms of geographical zones of production and reception, while offering alternative methodological approaches to the study of cinema within the local/global, inter-cultural contexts of the post-modern world. The elective elements of the degree allow students the opportunity to specialize in one or more of the many regional cinemas on offer in the School: Japanese, Chinese (mainland, Hong Kong & Taiwanese), mainland and maritime South East Asian, Indian, Iranian, Middle Eastern and African). It also enables students to combine specialist film studies knowledge with a minor module in an Asian or African language or to advance their social and cultural knowledge of a given region through an ethnographic module. Alternatively, through our links with University of London Screen Studies Group , students may choose from a selection of elective modules to further develop cross-cultural perspectives in an east/west framework. SOAS is exceptional in its geographical focus, and the expertise in the disciplines of Film and Screen Studies makes us unique in the field. In a ‘global’ industry, film and media scholars, and practitioners are increasingly recognising the need for a move toward the study of image cultures and industries beyond the historical hegemonies of the European and Hollywood industries. This has been more than evident in the career trajectories of graduates from the MA Global Cinemas and the Transcultural degree. Graduates from this degree have gone on to find employment in Film Festivals (Venice to name one), DVD distribution companies, the art house cinema circuit, while others with a practice based background have gone onto form their own production companies, in one case producing documentaries for Al-Jazeera (see the Contraimage link on the SOAS Centre for Film and Screen Studies website). Other graduates have followed the more traditional pathway into PhD programmes where they have been singularly successful in competing for AHRC studentships. Structure Each student takes 4 units in total: the Compulsory Course (1 unit), the Dissertation (1 unit), one unit from list 3 and one further unit of options of their choice. In choosing their courses, MA students are advised to pay careful attention to the balance of coursework across the two terms. In particular it is important to ensure that each term you have three taught courses. However much you might wish to take a mixture of courses that requires more coursework in one term than the other, it is most unwise to attempt to take four courses in one term and two in the other. Experience has shown that students simply cannot manage the load during the heavy term with the result that they either do very badly, fail or are unable to complete the courses in question. As a result Directors of Studies for the degrees and the Faculty staff will not approve a selection of courses which results in an imbalanced workload. 1. Compulsory Core Course Cinema, Nation and the Transcultural - 15PJKC023 (1 Unit) - Full Year 2. Dissertation in Global Cinemas and the Transcultural Dissertation For MA Global Cinemas And The Transcultural - 15PJKC998 (1 Unit) - Full Year 3. Compulsory courses in Cinemas of Asia and Africa Each student is also required to take at least ONE course (comprising either one whole course or two half courses) in Cinemas of Asia and Africa from section two below. Curating Africa: African Film and Video in the Age of Festivals - 15PAFH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Years of Radical change: South Korean cinema from the 'New Wave' to the new millenium - 15PJKH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Film and Society in the Middle East - 15PNMC230 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian Cinema: Its History and Social Context - 15PSAH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Indian Cinema: Key Issues - 15PSAH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Iranian media and film - 15PMSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Issues in the Anthropology of Film - 15PANH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Japanese Transnational Cinema: From Kurosawa to Asia Extreme and Studio Ghibli - 15PJKH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Film from Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora - 15PCHH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 (Post) Colonialism and Otherness in South East Asia on Screen - 15PSEH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Post-crisis Thai Cinema (1997-2007) - 15PSEH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indonesia on Screen(PG) - 15PSEH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Vietnam on Screen (PG) - 15PSEH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 4. Optional Courses: Students may take up to one full course or equivalent from the following list: Other Courses on Media Years of Radical change: South Korean cinema from the 'New Wave' to the new millenium - 15PJKH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Television since 1953 - 15PJKC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Studies in Global Media and Post-National Communication - 15PMSH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Theoretical Issues in Media and Cultural Studies - 15PMSH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Curating Africa: African Film and Video in the Age of Festivals - 15PAFH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Courses in Social Anthropology Please note the 'Media Production Skills' will not be available to MA Global Cinemas students in the 15/16 session. Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Courses in South Asian Studies Modern Bengal: the Evolution of Bengali Culture and Society from 1690 to the Present Day (MA) - 15PSAC289 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Courses from the following MA programmes offered by affiliated colleges in the University of London MA in the History of Film and Visual Media (Birkbeck College); MA Film Studies (Queen Mary); MA Screen Studies (Goldsmiths College); MA Contemporary Cinema Cultures (Kings College); MA Film Studies (UCL) NOTE: SOAS students may take up to one half unit (0.5) course from the list below. Birkbeck British Film and Television 1960-85 (Term 1); European Cinema at the Crossroads (Term 1); Exhibiting the Moving Image: Theory and Context (Term 1); Film Festivals (Term 2; this course includes a 10 day field trip); Global Television (Term 2); Exploring the Language of Image and Sound (Term 2); Contemporary American Cinema (Term 2) Goldsmiths Strategies of World Cinema (Term 1); Archaeology of the Moving Image (Term 1) Politics of the Audiovisual (Term 2); Experimental Media (Term 2); Contemporary Screen Narratives (Term 2); Representing Reality (Term 2) Kings College Cinema the City (Term 1); Popular European Cinema (Term 1); Cinema and War (Term 1); Film History and the Cinema Experience (Term 1); Analysing Film Performance: Comedy (Term 1); Experimental Film and Philosophy (Term 1) Exploitation Cinema (Term 2); Thinking Cinema: Theory, Philosophy, Ethics (Term 2); Cinema and Sentiment (Term 2); London Film Cultures (Term 2); The Moving Image in Art (Term 2) UCL These modules are subject to confirmation: Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme (Term 1); The French New Wave: Cahier Cinema (Term 1) Genre in Italian Cinema (Term 2); Spanish Film (Term 2); New Argentina Cinemas (Term 2); How to make an 8-minute documentary (Term 2); Political Cinema (Term 2); Film Exhibition (Term 2); Theories and Practices of Film (Term 2); The Idea of Documentary (Term 2); Russian Cinema: Epochs and Genres (Term 2) Queen Mary Paris on the Screen (Term 1) Films of Powell & Pressburger (Term 2); Moving Landscapes: the Berlin School in an International Context (Term 2); Hollywood and the 2nd World War (Term 2) Institute of Education Moving Image Production (Term 1) Digital Games, Play and Creativity (Term 2) Language course (subject to availability) One Language Acquisition course taught at SOAS (list available from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures) A Student's Perspective "I've been here for five years now, taking my BA and MA here before embarking on my PhD studies, so I've obviously had a good experience! I'd best describe this time as "enriching", opening my eyes to the best scholarship from around the world. " Lois Barnett [-]

MA in Global Media and Postnational Communication

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme focuses on the dynamic developments in media and communications within Asia, Africa and the Middle East. It examines the growing significance of these regions as the locations of new media players and new cultural genres, of complex audience involvements with mediated communication and as the sites of critical and creative responses to globalization processes. It challenges Eurocentric approaches to the study of media and provides a unique opportunity to study the media and communications environments of the non-Western world. [+]

MA in Global Media and Postnational Communication Duration: 1 Year Full Time, 2 or 3 Years Part Time Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This programme focuses on the dynamic developments in media and communications within Asia, Africa and the Middle East. It examines the growing significance of these regions as the locations of new media players and new cultural genres, of complex audience involvements with mediated communication and as the sites of critical and creative responses to globalization processes. It challenges Eurocentric approaches to the study of media and provides a unique opportunity to study the media and communications environments of the non-Western world. Students consider the dynamics of globalization and its critiques, the roles and nature of communications technologies and mediated content within these processes, and consequent changes in the nature of political, economic, financial, social and cultural activity. They develop advanced knowledge and understanding of the theoretical, methodological and empirical issues involved in the analysis of non-western media and communications within historical and contemporary contexts, and explore media dynamics in global civil society. A particular focus is the role that media have played in both defining and challenging processes of nation-building and providing spaces for the articulation of other forms of identity-formation, including those among minority ethnic, diasporic, exilic and refugee populations. The programme suits anyone with an interest in non-Western media and communications; journalists who wish to take time out to analyse critically their profession; NGO and development practitioners who wish to better understand the role of media in political and social change; and students who wish to continue on to MPhil/PhD research in Media and Communications. Structure Each student takes 4 units in total: the Compulsory Course (1 unit), the Dissertation (1unit), at least two half units from list 3 below, and up to one unit of Options of their choice (list 4). In choosing their courses, MA students are advised to pay careful attention to the balance of coursework across the two terms. In particular it is important to ensure that each term you have three taught courses. However much you might wish to take a mixture of courses that requires more coursework in one term than the other, it is most unwise to attempt to take four courses in one term and two in the other. Experience has shown that students simply cannot manage the load during the heavy term with the result that they either do very badly, fail or are unable to complete the courses in question. As a result Directors of Studies for the degrees and the Faculty staff will not approve a selection of courses which results in an imbalanced workload. An imbalance of courses between terms is only possible with the written permission of the convenor of the degree . 1. Compulsory Course: Global Media and Postnational Communication: Theoretical and Contemporary Issues Course Assessment: A critical essay of 5,000 words based on reading relevant to issues in global media and postnational communication. A critical essay based on a short research project (which may include a multimedia component). 2. Dissertation in Global Media and Postnational Communication Dissertation in Media Studies (supervisor to be allocated according to the dissertation topic). 3. Courses in Media Studies Students are required to take at least TWO half unit courses from List 3. International Political Communication - 15PMSH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Media Spectacle and Urban Space in East Asia - 15PMSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Mediated Culture in the Middle East: Politics and Communications - 15PMSH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Studies in Media, Information Communication Technologies and Development - 15PMSH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Theoretical Issues in Media and Cultural Studies - 15PMSH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use - 15PMSH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Qualitative Research Methods - 15PMSC033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Transnational Communities and Diasporic Media:Networking, Connectivity, Identity - 15PMSH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 4. Optional Courses: Students may take a course or courses up to the value of one full unit from the following lists: Digital traditional broadcasting communication - 15PMSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Courses in Cinemas of Asia and Africa Japanese Post-War Film Genres and the Avant-Garde - 15PJKH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Japanese Television since 1953 - 15PJKC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Genders and Sexualities in South East Asian Film - 15PSEH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Media Spectacle and Urban Space in East Asia - 15PMSH026 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 (Post) Colonialism and Otherness in South East Asia on Screen - 15PSEH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian Cinema: Its History and Social Context - 15PSAH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Indian Cinema: Key Issues - 15PSAH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Iranian media and film - 15PMSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Curating Africa: African Film and Video in the Age of Festivals - 15PAFH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Modern Chinese Film and Theatre (MA) - 15PCHH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Modern Film from Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora - 15PCHH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Courses in Social Anthropology Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of South East Asia - 15PANC088 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Anthropology of Development - 15PANC090 (1 Unit) - Full Year Perspectives On Development - 15PANH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Courses in the Department of Development Studies Civil society, social movements and the development process - 15PDSH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Courses in the Department of Economics For the following courses a background is required - admission is on a case-by-case basis Economic problems and policies in modern China - 15PECC035 (1 Unit) - Full Year Economic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region - 15PECC334 (1 Unit) - Full Year Courses in the Department of Politics Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Government and politics of modern South East Asia - 15PPOC247 (1 Unit) - Full Year Courses in the Department of the Languages and Cultures of Africa Courses in the Department of the Study of Religions and Art and Archaeology Christianity and Social Change in Sub Saharan Africa - 15PSRC157 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Critical Theory and the Study of Religions - 15PSRC037 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Jewishness on Screen - 15PSRH044 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Photography and the Image in Africa - 15PARH082 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Theory and Method in the Study of Religion - 15PSRC010 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Destinations A postgraduate degree in Media from SOAS gives students expertise in media, communications and film production within a global framework. It is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Media and Film Studies students develop a portfolio of transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and creative capacities including communication skills, interpersonal skills, team work, flexibility and dedication. Department graduates have gone into a wide range of careers and to complete research degrees. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Associated Press Breakthrough Breast Cancer British Film Institute Comic Relief Cordoba African Film Festival Discovery Communications European Commission Hackney Film Festival Institute of Ismaili Studies International Channel Shanghai Merlin Pfizer Pharmaceuticals Royal College of Art The Princess Royal Trust for Carers United Nations Zanan TV Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Research & Communications Manager Senior Publicist Teacher Events Manager Advisor Designer Journalist International Program Coordinator Creative Assistant Consultant Communications Officer Policy Advisor e-Learning Co-ordinator Director of Academic Studies Staff Writer Online Editor Public Information Officer Video Journalist Product Manager A Student's Perspective "I have found studying at SOAS an unbelievable experience, especially as the library houses a unique collections of both print and electronic resources." Zahrah Mamode [-]

MA in Historical Research Methods

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Historical Research Methods is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the research training guidelines favoured by UK Research Councils. It is intended for students with a good first degree in history, or who possess a taught Masters degree in history. Most students would be expected to progress to a research degree in history at the end of the degree, but it is also possible to take it as a stand-alone programme. [+]

MA in Historical Research Methods Duration: Full-time: 12 months; Part-time: 24 or 36 months Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent); relevant background in the region of specialism Start of programme: September intake only The MA in Historical Research Methods is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the research training guidelines favoured by UK Research Councils. It is intended for students with a good first degree in history, or who possess a taught Masters degree in history. Most students would be expected to progress to a research degree in history at the end of the degree, but it is also possible to take it as a stand-alone programme. Students must complete a programme in research training and submit a dissertation on an approved topic which is connected to the core course of this programme (Sources and Research Design in Historical Research). As part of this course candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words. Structure Core Course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1.0 unit) This course provides one-to-one training in research design and in the use of sources for a specific region under the guidance of the MA dissertation supervisor. It is assessed by 2 essays (10,000 words in total). The first is normally on source-based problems and the second on research design which is linked to the dissertation topic. Structure of the Programme This degree programme consists of four elements, including a 10,000-word dissertation: Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (Core course, 1.0 unit) Research Methods in History with reference to Asia and Africa (1.0 unit) Dissertation (1.0 unit) a minor course or courses (equivalent to 1.0 unit) chosen from the Minor Course Options list and/or a language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. Please note that not all the courses listed here will be available every year, and some new courses are likely to be added. For any queries, please contact the convener of the History MA Programme, who will also be pleased to provide more detailed information on individual courses. Minor Course Options Comparative/Global Environmental History of Asia - 15PHIH023 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 The Making of the Contemporary World - 15PHIH035 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Africa Colonial and Christian Missions in Africa: Readings from the Archives - 15PSRH043 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Colonial Conquest and Social Change in Southern Africa - 15PHIH002 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Culture and Society of East Africa - 15PANC084 (1.0 Unit) Culture and Society of West Africa - 15PANC083 (1.0 Unit) Government and politics in Africa - 15PPOC205 (1 Unit) - Full Year Historical Perspectives on Gender in Africa - 15PHIH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International politics of Africa - 15PPOC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Preaching, Prayer and Politics: Independent Christians in Southern Africa - 15PSRH042 (0.5 unit Unit) State & society in Asia & Africa - 15PPOC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year Slavery in West Africa in the 19th and 20th Centuries - 15PHIH028 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Social and Cultural Transformations in Southern Africa Since 1945 - 15PHIH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Near and Middle East Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Encountering the Other: the Middle East during the Crusading Period - 15PHIH037 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Israel, the Arab World and the Palestinians - 15PNMC038 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Trends in Islam - 15PNMC228 (1 Unit) - Full Year Outsiders in Medieval Middle Eastern Societies: Minorities, Social Outcasts and Foreigners - 15PHIH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Reading Classical Arabic Historians: Themes and Trends in Islamic Historiography - 15PNMC378 (1 Unit) - Full Year The End of Empire in the Middle East & the Balkans - 15PHIC004 (1 Unit) - Full Year South Asia Contemporary Islamism in South Asia: Readings in Sayyid Abu al-A'la Mawdudi - 15PSRC170 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Culture and Society of South Asia - 15PANC087 (1.0 Unit) Government and politics of modern South Asia - 15PPOC003 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 History and Doctrines of Indian Buddhism - 15PSRC059 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Literature & Colonialism in North India (Masters) - 15PSAH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Pakistan: History, Culture, Islam - 15PSAC288 (1 unit Unit) - Not Running 2016/17 The Body and the Making of Colonial Difference in British India - 15PHIH033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 The Indian Temple - 15PARC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year East Asia Modern Bengal: the Evolution of Bengali Culture and Society from 1690 to the Present Day (MA) - 15PSAC289 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Japanese Modernity I - 15PHIH013 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Japanese Modernity II - 15PHIH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Knowledge and Power in Early Modern China - 15PHIH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Nationhood and Competing Identities in Modern China - 15PHIH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Culture and Society of China - 15PANC089 (1.0 Unit) State and society in the Chinese political process - 15PPOC012 (1 Unit) - Full Year Culture and Society of Japan - 15PANC086 (1.0 Unit) Topics in Modern Korean History - 15PEAC059 (1 Unit) - Full Year Topics in the History of Traditional Korea - 15PEAC053 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 South East Asia Asian Wars : World War II and the End of Empire, 1942-1960 - 15 PHI H038 (0.5 unit Unit) World War II, Cold War, and the "War On Terror": the United States and South East Asia - 15PHIC059 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Jawi and the Malay Manuscript Tradition (Masters) - 15PSEH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Histories of Ethnicity and Conflict in South East Asia 1 - Making States and Building Nations - 15PHIH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Histories of Ethnicity and Conflict in South East Asia 2 - Non-National Perspectives - 15PHIH012 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Teaching & Learning Lectures and Seminars Teaching is generally by informal lectures and seminar discussions. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take. In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS are able to participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London. Dissertation The 10,000 word Dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses. Learning Resources SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Historical Research Methods from SOAS provides its students with an understanding of the world, giving them specialised historical knowledge and understanding of cultural sensibilities of a region. Postgraduate students are equipped with the expertise to continue in research as well as the skills needed to enable them to find professional careers in the private and public sectors. Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including familiarity with methods of research; the competence to manage large quantities of information; the ability to select and organise information and analytical skills. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. A Student's Perspective "For postgraduate students, the greatest attraction of SOAS is its research culture. There simply isn’t another institution with such a concentration of academic expertise on African and Asian history." Jack Lord [-]

MA in Human Rights Law

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Human Rights Law allows students to study human rights law, its application and relevance to a broad range of areas and legal issues, including Islamic law, Chinese law, gender, international law, conflict and labour law. [+]

MA in Human Rights Law Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second class honours preferably in a related discipline Start of programme: September intake only The MA in Human Rights Law allows students to study human rights law, its application and relevance to a broad range of areas and legal issues, including Islamic law, Chinese law, gender, international law, conflict and labour law. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners. Structure To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Human Rights specialisation: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit) Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit) Human Rights in the Developing World – 15PLAC111 (1 Unit) Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit) International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit) International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit) International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit) Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit) Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit) Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit) International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit) International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit) Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit) Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit) Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit) Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit) The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a unique British university, as it adopts a global view, but specialises in Asia, Africa and the Middle East: something it is very good at. This is evident in the passion and expertise of the teachers, the interests of the students and the many colourful exhibitions and cultural events regularly hosted here." Nunons Tagoe-Borllons [-]

MA in International and Comparative Commercial Law

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in International and Comparative Commercial Law allows students to learn about commercial law and its application in the globalised world. The modules available cover a broad range of geographical and legal areas, including comparative law, economic approaches to law, law and globalisation, banking and finance, Islamic, Chinese and Middle Eastern law, labour law, copyright, trade law, fraud, multinational enterprises and the WTO. [+]

MA in International and Comparative Commercial Law Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second class honours preferably in a related discipline Start of programme: September intake only The MA in International and Comparative Commercial Law allows students to learn about commercial law and its application in the globalised world. The modules available cover a broad range of geographical and legal areas, including comparative law, economic approaches to law, law and globalisation, banking and finance, Islamic, Chinese and Middle Eastern law, labour law, copyright, trade law, fraud, multinational enterprises and the WTO. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners. Structure To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the International and Comparative Commercial Law specialisation: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit) Chinese Commercial Law- 15PLAC106 (1 Unit) Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit) International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit) International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit) International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit) International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit) Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit) Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit) Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Foundations of Comparative law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit) Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "SOAS has an excellent reputation and its specialisation in the study of the Middle East was one of the main reasons I decided to come here." Nikola Georgiev [-]

MA in International Law

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in International Law allows students to study international law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including commerce, criminal law, humanitarian law, environmental law, and human rights. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. [+]

MA in International Law Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second class honours preferably in a related discipline Start of programme: September intake only The MA in International Law allows students to study international law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including commerce, criminal law, humanitarian law, environmental law, and human rights. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners. Structure To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the International Law specialisation: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit) International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit) International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit) Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit) Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit) Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit) Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit) International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit) Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit) Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit) Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit) Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit) International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit) International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit) Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit) Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit) Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit) Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit) The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a unique British university, as it adopts a global view, but specialises in Asia, Africa and the Middle East: something it is very good at. This is evident in the passion and expertise of the teachers, the interests of the students and the many colourful exhibitions and cultural events regularly hosted here." Nunons Tagoe-Borllons [-]

MA in Iranian Studies

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 United Kingdom London

The MA in Iranian Studies enables students to critically assess the historical development of Iranian society, economics and culture within the context of the wider west Asian area and to appreciate the complexity of the history and cultural make up of Iran. [+]

MA in Iranian Studies Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Among all universities in Europe and North America SOAS host the biggest concentration of research and teaching staff working on Iranian history, politics, economics, religions, art and archeology, linguistics, Persian language and literature, media, film, anthropology and music. SOAS has the resources to offer a comprehensive, critical perspective on a variety of aspects of Iranian society and culture and go beyond the contemporary public debates around this country. The MA in Iranian Studies enables students to critically assess the historical development of Iranian society, economics and culture within the context of the wider west Asian area and to appreciate the complexity of the history and cultural make up of Iran. The flexible study programme and interdisciplinary curriculum will enrich students knowledge about the religious and politico-cultural influences affecting contemporary Iran and the region it is embedded in. Students will develop a critical understanding of the literature and/or of Iran and the diaspora and gain an understanding of Iran in the context of the Middle East with respect to gender, politics, Islam, music, and migration (minor course options). Persian language and literature will also be studied. Structure Students take 4 units in total: the Core Course (1 unit), the Dissertation (1 unit) and two further courses from the Optional Courses lists (2 units). Core Course Iran: History, Culture, Politics - 15PNMC405 (1 Unit) - Full Year Optional Courses List A: Iran-specific courses Students must take at least one course from the following list Persian Language 1 - 15PNMC415 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Persian Language 2 (PG) - 15PNMC033 (1 Unit) - Full Year Persian Language 3 (PG) - 15PNMC408 (1 Unit) - Full Year Elementary Written Persian - 15PNMC387 (1 Unit) - Full Year Elementary Persian Texts (PG) - 15PNMC384 (1 Unit) - Full Year Persian for Readers of Arabic Script (PG) - 15PNMC422 (1 Unit) - Full Year Zoroastrianism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives - 15PSRC052 (1 Unit) - Full Year Text and Context in Zoroastrianism - 15PSRC036 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Iranian media and film - 15PMSH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Directed Readings in Perisan Studies - 15PNMC425 (1 Unit) - Full Year Classical Persian Poetry (Masters) - 15PNMC401 (1 Unit) - Full Year Avestan I - 15PSRC033 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Pahlavi Language - 15PSRC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Practical Translation from and into Persian - 15PNMC051 (1 Unit) - Full Year List B - Courses relating to the Middle East Students may select a course from List B OR another from List A Economic development of the Middle East - 15PECC341 (1 Unit) - Full Year Modern Trends in Islam - 15PNMC228 (1 Unit) - Full Year Gender in the Middle East - 15PGNH001 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 International Politics Of The Middle East - (Full unit Unit) Islam and Political Ideologies - 15PPOH007 (0.5 units Unit) Culture and Society of the Near and Middle East - 15PANC097 (1.0 Unit) Central Asian Music - 15PMUH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Problems of development in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PDSH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 10,000 word Dissertation Dissertation in Iranian Studies. This dissertation is new and currently going through the approval process. Destinations As a postgraduate student specialising in Iranian Studies, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of the Middle East. Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A Student's Perspective "Academically studying at SOAS has been incredible. At first I thought that getting to meet the big-name professors from my field would be the most enjoyable part of my experience but now I actually think it has been the other students." Quinn Connors, Tufts University [-]

MA in Islamic Law

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Islamic Law allows students to study Islamic law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including Islamic jurisprudence, Islamic family law, Law of Islamic finance and human rights, as well as its relationship to society in the Middle East, Asia and Africa. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. [+]

MA in Islamic Law Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second class honours preferably in a related discipline Start of programme: September intake only The MA in Islamic Law allows students to study Islamic law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including Islamic jurisprudence, Islamic family law, Law of Islamic finance and human rights, as well as its relationship to society in the Middle East, Asia and Africa. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners in their specialised fields. To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Islamic Law specialisation: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit) Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit) Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit) Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit) Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit) Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit) Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "I would not have studied anywhere else in London. I’m considering coming back for a Masters!" Caitlin Ryan, Georgetown University [-]

MA in Law, Culture and Society

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Law, Culture and Society allows students to study the relationships between law, society and cultural belief, broadly conceived. It gives students the opportunity to study direct impact of the law on commercial and governmental cultures, as well as the interactions between feminism and legal theory, and ethnic minorities and the law, amongst many others. [+]

MA in Law, Culture and Society Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second class honours preferably in a related discipline Start of programme: September intake only The MA in Law, Culture and Society allows students to study the relationships between law, society and cultural belief, broadly conceived. It gives students the opportunity to study direct impact of the law on commercial and governmental cultures, as well as the interactions between feminism and legal theory, and ethnic minorities and the law, amongst many others. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners. Structure To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following modules associated with the Law, Culture and Society specialisation: Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information. Full Module Units (1.0) Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit) Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit) Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit) International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit) International Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit) Law and Development in Africa - 15PLAC160 (1 Unit) Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit) Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit) Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit) Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit) Half Module Units (0.5) Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit) Comparative Constitutional Law - 15PLAH046 (0.5 Unit) Foundations of Chinese Law - 15PLAH045 (0.5 Unit) Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit) Law & Critique - 15PLAH053 (0.5 Unit) Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit) Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit) Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit) Dissertation (1.0) Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit) A Student's Perspective "Never, have I heard or seen the world so at peace, I mean only at SOAS will you see at one and the same time debates and events in support of both Israel and Palestine happening side by side harmoniously." Rehana Ahmed [-]

MA in Law, Development and Globalisation

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3  September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Law, Development and Globalisation allows students to study the relationships between law and development in the context of a globalising world. It gives students the opportunity to study the complex relationship between these processes and legal systems in an international and comparative context, with the opportunity to focus on a broad range of areas including: imperialism, inequality, finance and commerce. [+]

MA in Law, Development and Globalisation Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second class honours preferably in a related discipline Start of programme: September intake only The MA in Law, Development and Globalisation allows students to study the relationships between law and development in the context of a globalising world. It gives students the opportunity to study the complex relationship between these processes and legal systems in an international and comparative context, with the opportunity to focus on a broad range of areas including: imperialism, inequality, finance and commerce. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law,