University of Helsinki

Introduction

Over 30 Master’s Degree Programmes in English

The University of Helsinki offers a wide range of Master’s Degree Programmes, taught entirely in English. The scope of our programmes is 120 ECTS credits, completed with two years of full-time study. Some programmes are organised by the University of Helsinki along with other Finnish and foreign universities. All programmes comply with the national legislation governing university education and are, therefore, recognised globally.

One of the best multidisciplinary research universities in Europe

The University of Helsinki is one of Europe’s leading universities specialising the area of research. It is a founding member of the League of European Research Universities, which includes such universities as Oxford and Cambridge. The University is internationally renowned for its high quality teaching, research, and innovation. International rankings consistently place the University of Helsinki amongst the 20 best universities in Europe.

The main strength of the University of Helsinki is considered to be scientific research and the teachings which are derived from it, as we believe that teaching is closely linked to research. This is reflected in our philosophy: “all teachers are researchers and all researchers teach.”

Some facts about the University of Helsinki:

•The biggest university in Finland with over 35 000 students

•11 faculties and 4 campuses within the Helsinki area

•Ranked internationally number 72 out of the 15 000 universities according to Shanghai Jiao Tong University

•One of the oldest universities in Europe (founded 1640)

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programmes

This school also offers:

Master

Master in Economics

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

This programme prepares you for a career as an economist in business, financial markets and the public sector. Upon completing the programme you will be awarded the Master of Social Sciences degree, having demonstrated that you have developed many skills needed in your future career [+]

This programme prepares you for a career as an economist in business, financial markets and the public sector. Upon completing the programme you will be awarded the Master of Social Sciences degree, having demonstrated that you have developed many skills needed in your future career: Profound knowledge of economic theory and familiarity with scientific economic literature, The ability to apply economic theory to solving practical problems and interpreting economic phenomena, Familiarity with econometric methods and the ability to apply them to practical research problems, The ability to collect and interpret empirical data, The ability to communicate conclusions and assess the significance of the assumptions made for them, Fluency in communicating economic issues to different domestic and international audiences as well as the capability to work independently and in multidisciplinary cooperation, Readiness to assess your own professional performance and systematically develop it, and Knowledge of sources of economic information and the ability to adopt new tools of economic analysis. The programme comprises two tracks. The Research track is more demanding in that it gives more profound knowledge of economic theory and econometric methods than the General track. This track is particularly suitable if your goal is to pursue a doctoral degree in economics. Profound knowledge of economic theory and methods is also useful in many demanding careers as an economist. The degree requirements in both tracks correspond to international standards, which will help you when finding employment and pursuing further studies towards a doctoral degree in Finland and globally. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 18,000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The language of teaching is English. It is also possible to complete courses, write the Master's thesis and get supervision in Finnish or Swedish. At the beginning of the programme, you select the language of studies and demonstrate your competence in it. Pro­gramme con­tents The module of Economic Theory and Econometric Methods, which you will take in the autumn semester of your first year of study, is the foundation of the programme. It covers the central microeconomic and macroeconomic theory as well as basic econometric methods. After completing this module, you can choose from a wide selection of fields of economics to concentrate on. Optional studies consist of additional courses in economics, or other university-level courses. In addition, an internship or a labour market project is included in the degree requirements. The programme mostly comprises lecture courses. The courses on economic theory and econometric methods consist of lectures and exercise sessions; for the most part they are completed by taking a written examination. Depending on the track, you take 3 to 4 field courses, selected based on your interests so that they form a meaningful whole. Additional field courses in economics can be included in the optional studies. In the field courses, you will be exposed to different teaching methods, such as problem-based learning and other group activities and seminars. Your grades in many field courses will be based on assignments, presentations and term papers in addition to a final examination. Economics is a quantitative social science discipline, so you are expected to have good basic command of mathematics and statistics. Your skills in these areas will be systematically developed in this programme. Especially if you aim for a career as an economist or for doctoral studies, you are advised to include further methodological courses in your optional studies. In addition to mathematics and statistics, courses in computer science are recommended. The structure of the programme is comparable to those of the Master's programmes in economics offered by the best international universities. It differs from the Master's programmes of the Finnish business schools in that the demanding courses in economic theory and econometrics comprise a greater proportion, and the goal is above all to prepare you for a career as an economist. The research track corresponds to Master's programmes in quantitative economics offered by some foreign universities. In line with our programme, the research track will prepare you for a career as an economist and for doctoral studies in economics. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor The programme has two tracks: General track Research track You select the track when applying for the programme: your choice will determine the degree requirements. The difference between the tracks is that the Research track aims at providing more profound knowledge of economic theory and econometric methods, whereas the General track emphasises fields and applications of economics, and it is possible to include more optional studies in the degree. The Research track prepares you for doctoral studies in economics, and its degree requirements contain most of the doctoral-level core courses in economic theory and econometrics. Taking these courses as part of the Master's degree helps you to graduate faster from the doctoral programme later. Graduates from the Research track are given precedence for the doctoral programme in economics at the University of Helsinki. The Research track is also recommended if you are interested in taking the more demanding core courses to acquire more profound knowledge of economics even if your goal is not to pursue doctoral studies. Pro­gramme struc­ture The programme comprises 120 credits (ECTS, European Credit Transfer System), and it is designed to be completed in two years. The degree requirements consist of the following modules (in the General / Research track): Advanced studies (at least 90 ECTS / 100 ECTS) Economic theory and econometric methods (30 ECTS / 45 ECTS) Research skills (10 ECTS) Master's thesis (30 ECTS) Field courses in economics (at least 20 ECTS / 15 ECTS) Internship or Labour market project (5 to 15 ECTS) Optional studies (15 to 25 ECTS / 5 to 15 ECTS) After completing the unit in economic theory and econometric methods, you select the fields in economics that you want to concentrate on. It is advisable for you to include further advanced field courses in economics or methodological courses in your optional studies. The study unit in research skills prepares you for writing the Master's thesis, and familiarises you with scholarly work in economics, research ethics and reporting research results. In addition, you prepare a research proposal for your thesis. Integrated into the studies, the degree requirements include drawing up a personal study plan, and career planning. An internship period, a labour market project or other studies aimed at developing employment skills are also included (5 to 15 ECTS so that the extent of these studies and the optional studies amount to 30 ECTS in the General track and to 20 ECTS in the Research track). Thesis You will write your Master's thesis (30 ECTS) during the spring semester of your second year of study. This can be either a theoretical or an empirical thesis on a topic selected under the guidance of your supervisor, where you apply the knowledge and skills you have acquired in the programme. In a theoretical thesis, you will consider an economic problem in the light of existing literature and potentially extend existing economic models. In an empirical thesis, on the other hand, you will approach an economic problem by applying econometric methods to relevant economic data. It is also possible to concentrate on developing a new econometric method or comparing the properties of existing methods. You start preparing for writing your thesis in the autumn semester of your second year of study by completing the Research skills study module, which includes drawing up a research proposal for your thesis. Supervision primarily takes place in the Master's Thesis seminar, lasting the entire spring semester of your second year of study. You may write the thesis in English, Finnish, or Swedish. Ca­reer pro­spects The Master's Programme in Economics at the University of Helsinki prepares you for a career as an economist in business and the public sector. Economists are employed in administrative, planning and development duties requiring economic expertise in various national and international organisations. Examples include an analyst career involving risk management, asset pricing and investment strategy, jobs related to analysing the market, production and pricing in companies, assessment and planning of economic policy, and communication. Analytical skills and knowledge of quantitative methods will be of central importance in your work as an economist. In particular, economists find employment in government, financial institutions, central banks, national and international organisations, and business. The Research track prepares you for particularly demanding careers. It is also an excellent path to doctoral studies in economics. It is advisable to select the field courses and the topic for your Master's thesis in view of your interests and career goals. An internship is a good chance to acquire work experience in your area of interest. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion The atmosphere at the Helsinki Centre of Economic Research (HECER) is quite international, consisting of the Discipline of Economics and the departments of economics at Aalto University and the Hanken School of Economics. The staff regularly publish in international journals and collaborate with foreign researchers. There are also several regular research seminars on a number of fields, where mostly foreign visitors present their work. In addition, foreign researchers often pay longer visits to the HECER, and a large proportion of the graduate students come from abroad. All courses in the programme are taught in English, and a large proportion of Master's theses are written in English. The staff have ample experience at universities abroad, and there are several foreigners among them. Foreign graduate students act as teaching assistants, and exchange students from the universities involved in the HECER regularly take the courses of the programme. You can include study units in foreign languages arranged by the Language Centre in the optional studies. The degree requirements meet internationally unified standards in economics. The University of Helsinki has a number of agreements with foreign universities that enable you to visit them to gain international experience and take courses offered there. Courses taken at the master's level at universities abroad can replace field courses in economics in the degree requirements, and you can include other university-level courses in your optional studies. The most suitable time for a visit to a foreign university is in the spring semester of your first year of study after completing the core courses in economic theory and econometrics. You can also include an internship abroad as part of your studies. Net­work­ing Teaching in the programme is arranged in cooperation with the departments of economics of Aalto University and Hanken School of Economics. Together with the Discipline of Economics at the University of Helsinki, they form the Helsinki Centre of Economic Research (HECER), which also advances research in economics in Finland by arranging regular research seminars. The VATT Institute of Economic Research shares the same building with the three units of the HECER. Together they form the greatest concentration of economists in Finland. The Discipline of Economics has a joint professorship of public economics with the VATT Institute of Economic Research, and a joint professorship in Empirical Macroeconomics with Statistics Finland. In addition to the courses arranged by the units of HECER, in the optional studies you can include courses from the wide selection offered by the University of Helsinki as well as courses of other Finnish universities, under the flexible study rights agreement (JOO). A number of study units in development Economics are arranged in collaboration with the World Institute for Development Economics Research of the United Nations University (UNU-WIDER). The Discipline of Economics has close connections to the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Helsinki in research and education, and they both participate in the Bachelor Programme in Mathematical Sciences. Re­search fo­cus Central fields of research in economics at the University of Helsinki include time series econometrics, game theory and applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics and public economics. The goal of research in time series econometrics is to develop statistical methods applicable in modelling economic time series and to apply them in empirical economic research. At the University of Helsinki, the research has concentrated on models useful in examining the connections between the macroeconomy and financial markets, and they have been applied to aggregate macroeconomic time series, stock returns and interest rates, amongst other things. Microeconomics studies the interaction between single agents and communities, for example markets. Typical research topics include consumer behaviour, pricing, competition, exploitation of market power, and company behaviour. The central method of microeconomic research, decision and game theory, takes into account the agents' strategic behaviour. At the University of Helsinki, game theory has been applied to problems involving bargaining, search and contracts as well as immaterial rights. Macroeconomics comprises research on economic growth and business cycles. At the University of Helsinki, the former has focused on the effects of globalisation, environmental issues and labour market institutions on economic growth. Recent research on business cycles has focused on monetary and fiscal policy as well as on the role of the financial system in determining the cycles. Research on public economics has dealt with income distribution and socio-economic mobility. [-]

Master in Food Sciences

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Do you want to have an impact on what people will eat in the future? Would you like to know what makes food taste good, due to the raw materials and processing technologies? Do you want to know how we could improve the healthiness, safety, ecology and ethics of food and food processing? Are you interested in exploring innovations in food, such as "pulled oats" or using insects as food? If you answered yes, enrol in Food Sciences master’s programme. [+]

Do you want to have an impact on what people will eat in the future? Would you like to know what makes food taste good, due to the raw materials and processing technologies? Do you want to know how we could improve the healthiness, safety, ecology and ethics of food and food processing? Are you interested in exploring innovations in food, such as "pulled oats" or using insects as food? If you answered yes, enrol in Food Sciences master’s programme. The food industry is the 4th most important employer both in Finland and internationally. This industry is constantly looking for experts to solve new problems. With a Master’s degree in Food Sciences you could embark on a career in the food industry; in a food, agricultural or environmental control laboratory; as a teacher, researcher, or self-employed entrepreneur; or as an expert in government ministries or other expert organisations. As a master in Food Sciences you will be able to help the food industry develop and renew itself, since you will possess know-how on: Raw materials and processes, including their theoretical basics Different food constituents and their impact on food quality Factors that ensure good quality and food safety You can enrol in the Food Sciences masters' programme if you hold a bachelors' degree in Food Sciences or in Molecular Biosciences. You can also apply to the programme if you have a bachelors' degree in a related area of the natural sciences from a Finnish or foreign university, or if you have a degree from a Finnish university of applied sciences within food sciences or other related areas of the natural sciences. Your studies in the Food Sciences masters' programme will offer you a broad education covering courses in the composition and processing of food, in the structures and chemical reactions of food proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, and in food legislation and the safety of food additives. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion Teaching is in English, but you can also complete the programme in Finnish or Swedish. Pro­gramme con­tents Food Sciences on the Viikki campus is a nationally unique programme that covers the whole food production chain from primary production via food processing to consumers. Food Sciences is an internationally appreciated field of education: food research at the University of Helsinki has been highly ranked. Your masters' studies in food sciences will enable you to make an impact on the the creation of innovative solutions for the whole chain of food production. You will: Study the theory and applications of the broad area of food sciences in lecture courses and in group work Increase your knowledge of food composition, processing, structure, and legislation Deepen your knowledge of how the reactions of different food components, production processes and packaging affect the structure, sensory quality, healthiness and safety of animal and plant based foods Learn laboratory working skills Acquire employment skills for example by training in the food industry Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor You can affect the sort of expertise you would like to gain. You can tailor your Master’s degree by choosing special studies in food chemistry, food technology, and in the science and technology relating to meat, dairy and cereals. You can also complement your expertise in food sciences with, for example, studies in food development, food safety, food research and analysis, economics, marketing, sustainable food production, microbiology, biotechnology or nutrition. Pro­gramme struc­ture You will need 120 credits (ECTS) for the Master’s degree. Together with your faculty adviser, you will make a personal study plan consisting of: 60 credits of advanced studies in food sciences including a Master’s thesis Studies of your choice in special areas of food sciences Complementary studies of your choice Studies of your free choice You can also include career planning, an internship and studies abroad in your Master’s degree. Thesis A Master’s thesis (30 credits) is included in the Master’s degree programme. Your thesis should consist of a review of the existing literature and an experimental section. In the Food Sciences Masters' programme, you can often complete your thesis within a research group or in collaboration with the food industry. When you pose the question addressed in your thesis, your goal should be to acquire new understanding of an issue and to develop your own problem-solving skills. The topic of your thesis might also be the development of a new technology or product. In terms of methodology, your thesis can be based on chemistry, physics, technology, biochemistry, microbiology or sensory science. Doing your Master’s thesis will train you in scientific thinking, analysis of problems, development of explanatory models and hypotheses, planning experiments and working in the laboratory and/or making pilot-plant experiments, and presenting your research results and your critical discussion. Ca­reer pro­spects With a Master’s degree in Food Sciences, you can find work as a product quality manager in the food industry; as an inspector in a food, agricultural or environmental control laboratory; as a teacher or researcher at a university; as self-employed entrepreneur; or as an expert in a government ministry or other expert organisation. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion As a student in Food Sciences you have excellent opportunities for an international student exchange or internship. You can also perform part of your degree studies at a university abroad. Due to the instruction in English, the many international students on the Viikki campus, and the many international personnel in the research groups, you will be part of an international community in your daily student life. Net­work­ing The Viikki campus of biosciences offers you plenty of possibilities to broaden the scope of your Food Sciences Master’s degree. The education and research cover for all areas of the food production chain from the field to the table. You can also take advantage of the education offered by other fields of science within Helsinki University. The Food Sciences faculty work in close collaboration with research institutes and with the food industry. These include the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, the National Food Safety Authority Evira, the Customs laboratory, LUKE National Resources Institute Finland, and environment centres. Re­search fo­cus Research in food sciences at the University of Helsinki is multidisciplinary and has been acknowledged both nationally and internationally. The research focus is: Food production chains Food quality and healthy nutrition Department of Food and Environmental Sciences [-]

Master in Global Politics and Communication

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Global Politics and Communication is an interdisciplinary and innovative Master’s degree programme that addresses the key challenges of globalisation from the perspective of media and communication studies, organisation research and global political economy. The programme emphasises developing your critical thinking, a necessary skill in many careers. [+]

Global Politics and Communication is an interdisciplinary and innovative Master’s degree programme that addresses the key challenges of globalisation from the perspective of media and communication studies, organisation research and global political economy. The programme emphasises developing your critical thinking, a necessary skill in many careers. The specific objectives of the programme include: Providing you with advanced knowledge of global political economy, relationships between the media and the development of democracy, and linkages between governance, organisations and communication Empowering you to assess how politics and the media are linked to the forces of globalisation Equipping you with conceptual understanding and the theoretical and methodological skills needed to carry out original and relevant research on key societal issues Preparing you to engage in public discussions and develop critical reasoning and argumentation skills that are equally important in academia, public organisations and the private sector The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 13 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The working language of the Global Politics and Communication programme is English. The degree can include up to 30 credits (ECTS) of studies in other languages, such as Finnish or Swedish, or courses completed during an international exchange or an exchange at another university in Finland. The Diploma Supplement given upon graduation states that the degree has been completed in English. Pro­gramme con­tents How do global transformations affect democratic politics? What is the role of the media in the transformation of contemporary democracies? Why do economic activities result in global and national financial crises and inequality instead of in stability and democratisation? How does governance affect organisations and communication, and how do governance and organisations structure communication and political and economic activity? The Global Politics and Communication programme offers a cutting-edge combination of political science, communication studies and global political economy. You will apply ideas, concepts and methodologies to key societal and political issues such as the changing character of democracy, the role of organisations and governance in the globalising world, and the regulation of global finance and trade. During the first year, you will study general theoretical and methodological courses and take part in thematic courses offered by the programme’s study tracks. You will also begin to work on your Master’s thesis. In the second year, you will deepen your knowledge on your selected study track or study tracks by participating in thematic specialisation courses. You will also attend the Master’s seminar and write your Master’s thesis. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor The Master’s degree programme on Global Politics and Communication has three study tracks: Governance, Organisations and Communication Media and Democracy Global Political Economy The interplay between Governance, Organisations and Communication gives this study line its name. Governance and organisational and communication practices are increasingly global but are modified locally. The foci of this study line include the global governance of knowledge, organisational communication, the changing institutions of knowledge and communication, the digitalisation of politics and communication, and changes in media policies. Media and Democracy exposes you to the key debates about the relationship between the media and democratic processes at a time when the future of democracy remains uncertain because of authoritarian tendencies in politics and the commercialisation of the public sphere. It focuses on such questions as how the media represent and frame conflicts and war; how new forms of political participation are challenging the traditional conduct of politics; how human rights such as freedom of expression rely on media practices; and how new digital media reconfigure public communities and extend the possibilities for civic engagement. Global Political Economy covers multidisciplinary studies drawing on economics, sociology, and political science. It explains how social practices and institutions constitute relational, complex and open systems of production, exchange and distribution. Taking into account the widely-shared aim of sustainable global development, political economy is crucial for understanding the principal current problems such as global warming; potential financial crises; disparities in income, wealth and power; or war and peace. You will specialise in one of these three study tracks. However, you can also combine them by including courses from other study tracks in your elective studies. Pro­gramme struc­ture The Master's Degree Programme on Global Politics and Communication is a full-time, two-year programme. The programme fulfils the requirements of a 120 credits (ECTS, European Transfer Credit System) Master's degree in social sciences in the Faculty of Social Sciences. The programme consists of advanced studies in politics and communication, as well as other elective and compulsory studies. Master’s Degree Programme on Global Politics and Communication: 120 credits (ECTS) Advanced studies: 80 – 95 credits Theoretical studies 10-15 credits Methodology studies 10-15 credits Specialisation Studies 20-25 credits Master’s Seminar (10 credits) and Master’s Thesis (30 credits) 40 credits Elective studies and other studies, including voluntary internship: 25 – 40 credits Thesis To complete your master’s studies, you will conduct research and write a Master’s thesis (30 credits). The usual length of a Master’s thesis is about 50-70 pages. You will select your topic under the guidance of your supervisor. When writing your thesis, you will need to acquire advanced knowledge in your chosen field and develop analytical and critical thinking skills. You will learn to formulate research questions, plan and design your research, conduct it and report your results with an understanding of the key concepts, debates and perspectives concerning your chosen topic. Ca­reer pro­spects Graduates of the Discipline of Politics and Communication Studies at the University of Helsinki have gone on to work in a range of jobs as experts and consultants in Finland and internationally, in the public and the private sectors as well as in non-governmental organisations. They are mainly employed in the fields of politics, administration, the media and communication. Some graduates also continue on with academic research to pursue an academic career in universities in Finland and around the world. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion The Global Politics and Communication programme is an international programme with students from around the world. In addition to the degree students, we receive many visiting and exchange students and scholars from Europe and further afield. In addition to providing you with a unique international learning environment, we also encourage you to participate in Erasmus and Nordplus exchange programmes for a short-term study period in Scandinavian and European universities. You will have the opportunity of doing a voluntary internship abroad with support from Erasmus. Net­work­ing One of the advantages of studying at the Faculty of Social Sciences is the possibility to study elective courses in other Master’s programmes in disciplines such as sociology, social psychology, journalism, social policy, and other subjects. Academic freedom is a strong part of the studying experience at the University of Helsinki. This gives you the possibility to study different elective studies within the university and the other universities in the Helsinki metropolitan area through Flexible Study Right (JOO) agreements. You can also conduct your master’s research in a company where you are working. Re­search fo­cus Political science research on democracy Political science research on governance, organisations, and communication Media and communication studies Political economy [-]

MSc

Master in Agricultural, Environmental and Resource Economics

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Are you looking forward to a future as an expert in Agricultural, Environmental and Resource Economics? As a graduate of our Master’s Programme in Agricultural, Environmental and Resource Economics, you can find employment in the national or international market, for example at universities, research institutes, the public sector or in business, or you can become a self-employed entrepreneur. [+]

Are you looking forward to a future as an expert in Agricultural, Environmental and Resource Economics? As a graduate of our Master’s Programme in Agricultural, Environmental and Resource Economics, you can find employment in the national or international market, for example at universities, research institutes, the public sector or in business, or you can become a self-employed entrepreneur. The Viikki Campus offers optimal resources for studying the unique range of subjects offered by our programme. Upon graduating you will be a professional in applied economics in agricultural, environmental and resource-focused fields. You will be well versed in topics such as climate policy, sustainable agriculture and food security. The Master's programme comprises two study tracks: Agricultural economics Languages of instruction: Finnish, Swedish, English Environmental and resource economics Language of instruction: English As a graduate of the study track in Agricultural Economics you will have the ability to Support decision-making in the public and private sectors in various roles as a consultant, researcher or public servant Analyse and communicate the impact of policies on fields relating to agriculture, the environment and natural resources Apply economic theories and quantitative methodologies, such as econometrics and numerical modelling, to issues in the field As a graduate of the study track in Environmental and Resource economics you will have the ability to Identify the socio-economic drivers of natural resource use and environmental degradation Analyse the effects of policies on the environment and on natural resource usage Formulate recommendations to support decision-making in both the public and private sectors Apply microeconomic theory and quantitative methods (econometrics, analytical and numerical dynamic modelling, game theory) The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The study track in environmental and resource economics is taught only in English. The study track in agricultural economics is taught in Finnish, Swedish and English. Pro­gramme con­tents Study track: Agricultural economics After completing the study track in agricultural economics you will be able: To apply the concepts and central theories of agricultural economics To apply perspectives of economic, ecological and social sustainability To analyse and develop the business operations of agricultural and rural enterprises as well as intensify production in a sustainable manner To analyse the operation of agricultural and food markets To analyse the international political steering of agriculture. The study track of agricultural economics combines expertise in business administration and economics with knowledge of the special features of agriculture, rural enterprises, the food market and related policies. Through studies in agricultural economics, you will learn to apply theories and models used to define the profitability and competiveness of agricultural and rural enterprises and the farm-level factors contributing to profitability and competiveness. You will examine the operation of the market and assess various policy options. The studies include practice-oriented assignments that build your decision-making and career skills, and your self-confidence to apply theoretical knowledge in practice. Study track: Environmental and Resource Economics In this study track you will receive a state-of-the-art economic education in environmental and natural resources policy. The courses are divided into three groups: Theoretically focused courses in which you will gain a deep understanding of static and dynamic models and applications of game theory Courses focusing on quantitative methods in which you will gain the ability to run numerical simulations and apply econometric methods Thematic courses focusing on relevant challenges in environmental and resource policy. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor Graduates of the Bachelor’s Programme in Environmental and Food Economics can continue directly to the Master’s Programme in Agricultural, Environmental and Resource Economics, provided that they specialised in agricultural, environmental and resource economics for their Bachelor’s degree. In addition, graduates of the Bachelor’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences can continue directly to the study track in agricultural economics, provided that they have completed the module in agricultural economics for their Bachelor’s degree. Applicants from other programmes and universities must have completed a sufficient amount of studies in economics, mathematics and statistics. Some of these studies may be incorporated into the Master’s degree as optional studies. If there are more applicants than student places, admission will be based on your previous academic performance and the applicability of your Bachelor’s degree. Pro­gramme struc­ture The scope of the Master’s level studies is 120 credits, including both field-specific advanced studies and optional studies in the field or from other degree programmes. The minimum scope of field-specific advanced studies is 60 credits, 30 of which are accounted for by the Master’s thesis. You are recommended to focus on your Master’s thesis during your second year of Master’s studies. Study track: Agricultural economics The modules are: agricultural markets and policy business economics rural entrepreneurship environmental and natural resources. In addition, your studies must include at least 15 credits of methodological studies. The studies encompass a practical training period and seminars, and they can include career orientation and career planning. You will also need to complete a personal study plan (PSP). The scope of optional field-specific studies and studies offered by other degree programmes is 30–40 credits. Study track: Environmental and Resource Economics The study track lasts four semesters, lasting approximately 22 months (1st year beginning of August- 2nd year beginning of June). Core modules (45 ECTS) Environmental economics Natural Resource Economics, dynamic optimisation and numerical models Environmental valuation, applied econometrics and cost-benefit analysis Thematic modules (30 ECTS) Choose two of the following: climate change, Baltic Sea protection, agricultural economics and agri-environmental policy, forest economics Internship and Master’s thesis seminar 15 credits (ECTS) Master’s thesis 30 credits (ECTS) Total 120 credits (ECTS) Thesis Study track: Agricultural economics The Master’s thesis project will enable you to apply and develop your theoretical and methodological skills. Your thesis supervisor will be the professor or a university lecturer in your study track, or another high-level expert in the field. You can write your thesis as part of a research project or in collaboration with a research institute or company. Besides examining the theoretical framework of the thesis, the project involves acquisition of the research material, analysis using appropriate research methods, and drawing conclusions. The length of the thesis will be about 50 pages. Drafting the research plan and the thesis itself, presenting the work in seminars and discussing it critically will develop your scientific thinking, argumentation and communication skills. The Master’s thesis will serve as a good reference for your future career, as you will have enhanced your field-specific expertise during the research and writing process. The thesis project will also develop your abilities in scientific thinking and project management. Study track: Environmental and Resource Economics You will complete your Master’s thesis during the third and fourth semesters. For your thesis you research and analyse a significant topic on environmental and resource policy. You can write your thesis in connection with a larger research project, in collaboration with companies and public institutions, or independently. Ca­reer pro­spects According to the labour market surveys conducted by the Finnish Association of Academic Agronomists, graduates from the study track in agricultural economics have been successful in finding employment – often before graduation. The programme alumni have found positions in various organisations in the public and private sectors in Finland, and many have pursued international careers in Europe or further afield. This study programme provides you with wide-ranging skills for starting a business and for serving in various expert or managerial positions, even if the focus of studies is on applied agriculture. Consequently, possible job titles are numerous: specialist, teacher, entrepreneur, researcher, senior officer, product manager, head of finance, etc. If you are interested in developing your expertise further, you can pursue postgraduate studies in the doctoral programmes offered by the University of Helsinki or another university in Finland or abroad. The study track Environmental and Resource Economics offers promising career paths in government, research, consultancy, industry, NGOs and international organisations. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion As a student in the programme, you will have opportunities for internships, visits and study exchanges with partner universities. Visiting foreign lecturers give intensive courses as part of the thematic modules. As a student you will also be able to join our international research networks. Net­work­ing Study track: Agricultural economics In addition to other universities and institutions of higher education, the programme engages in cooperation with the Natural Resources Institute Finland (LUKE), Pellervo Economic Research, the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, the Pellervo Cooperative Society, producers’ organisations (including the Central Union of Agricultural Producers and Forest Owners and the Central Union of Swedish-speaking Agricultural Producers in Finland), banks, insurance institutions and various companies within the food sector. During your Master’s studies, you can complete a practical training period in a company or government agency. The programme cooperates with agricultural universities in the Nordic countries, Estonia and other European countries, and has partners in North America, Africa and Asia. Study track: Environmental and Resource Economics Teaching and student exchange programmes with the following institutes: Department of Economics, University of Kiel Norwegian School of Economics, Bergen Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås University of Southern Denmark, Odense University of Algarve, Faro Re­search fo­cus Study track: Agricultural economics Agricultural economics and entrepreneurship Agricultural business economics Agricultural, rural and food policy Agricultural and food markets Agriculture and food security in the developing world Study track: Environmental and Resource Economics Climate and energy Economic-ecological optimisation Baltic Sea protection Forest economics International fisheries agreements Biodiversity offsets Agri-environmental policy [-]

Master in Agricultural Sciences

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Join the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences on the Viikki Campus to find solutions for the challenges of today and tomorrow. The University of Helsinki is the only university in Finland to offer academic education in this field. [+]

Would you like to be involved in finding solutions to future challenges of food and energy production, such as climate change, population growth and limited energy resources? Are you interested in animal welfare, clean soil, environmental issues or the newest methods in biological and genetic engineering? Would you like to learn about automation and robotics in agriculture? Join the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences on the Viikki Campus to find solutions for the challenges of today and tomorrow. The University of Helsinki is the only university in Finland to offer academic education in this field. In the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences, you can pursue studies in plant production sciences, animal science, agrotechnology, or environmental soil science, depending on your interests and previous studies. For further information about the study tracks, see Programme contents. Upon completing a Master’s degree, you will: Be an expert in plant production science, animal science, agrotechnology, or environmental soil science. Be able to assess the sustainability and environmental impact of food and energy production. Be able to apply biosciences, ecology, chemistry, physics or statistics, depending on your study track, to the future needs of agriculture. Have mastered the key issues and future development trends of your field. Have mastered state-of-the-art research and analysis methods and techniques. Be able to engage in international activities, project work and communication. Be able to acquire and interpret scientific research information in your field and present it orally and in writing. Have the qualifications to pursue postgraduate studies in a doctoral programme or a career as an expert or entrepreneur. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences is multilingual: the language of instruction is primarily English, but you can complete your studies in Finnish, Swedish or English. Pro­gramme con­tents The Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences comprises four study tracks: Plant production sciences – plants as sources of food, feed, energy, beauty and wellbeing During your studies, you will have the opportunity to apply biology to the breeding, cultivation, protection and production ecology of crop or horticultural plants. Producing sufficient food is one of the great challenges facing humanity. Plant production sciences have an important mission in finding solutions to this challenge. Plants are cultivated not only for food and feed, but also for bioenergy, green landscapes and ornamental purposes; plant production sciences seek new, improved solutions for all these purposes. Animal science – animal health and wellbeing During your studies, you will become familiar with issues pertaining to the wellbeing, nutrition and breeding of production and hobby animals as well as with the relevant biotechnology. In this study track you will apply biochemistry, animal physiology, genetics and molecular biology for the benefit of sustainable animal production. The Viikki Research Farm, in urban Helsinki, provides plenty of opportunities for hands-on learning! Agrotechnology – technology with consideration for the environment This study track provides you with the opportunity to study technologies that are key to agricultural production and the environment, from the basics to the latest innovations. Advances in technology and automation offer new horizons to fearless inventors interested in developing machinery and engineering for the reorganisation, implementation and adjustment of production in accordance with the needs of plants and animals. Environmental soil science – dig below the surface These studies allow you to literally dig beneath the surface. The soil is a central factor for the production of renewable natural resources, the diversity of nature, and the quality of water systems. As an expert in environmental soil science you will know how the soil serves as a substrate for plants and affects the quality of food, and how it can be improved. For further information about study contents, visit the programme home page. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor The Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences comprises four study tracks, allowing you to focus on a specialisation according to your interests and previous studies: plant production sciences (quota of 40 students), animal science (quota of 25 students), agrotechnology (quota of 15 students), and environmental soil science (quota of 5 students). You can be admitted to the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences either directly from the relevant Bachelor’s programme or through a separate admissions process. A total of 80 students will be admitted through these two admissions channels. Direct admission Bachelor’s graduates from the following applicable University of Helsinki Bachelor’s programmes can continue their studies in the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences in accordance with previously determined criteria and principles without having to apply separately: Bachelor’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences, Bachelor’s Programme in Environmental Sciences, Bachelor’s Programme in Molecular Biosciences and Bachelor’s Programme in Biology. If there are more applicants to any of the study tracks than there are student places, admission will be based on previous academic performance and the applicability of the previous degree. Separate admission Applications are also accepted from graduates of other University of Helsinki Bachelor’s programmes than those listed above as well as from graduates of other Finnish or international universities. In these cases, admission will be based on your previous academic performance and the applicability of your previous degree. Pro­gramme struc­ture With a scope of 120 credits (ECTS), the Master’s programme can be completed in two academic years. The degree comprises: 60 credits of advanced studies in the selected study track, including your Master’s thesis (30 credits) 60 credits of other studies from the curriculum of your own or other degree programmes The study tracks of the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to construct thematic modules around importance topical issues: the bioeconomy, the recycling of nutrients, food systems, and the production and exploitation of genomic information. You must also complete a personal study plan (PSP). Your studies can also include career orientation and career planning. Various teaching methods are used in the programme, including lectures, practical exercises, practical laboratory and field courses, practical training, seminars, project work and independent study. Thesis The Master’s degree culminates in a Master’s thesis of approximately 50 pages on a topic related to your study track. Completing the Master’s thesis demonstrates your ability to prepare a written scientific presentation in your native language or English, to use source materials critically, and to present your thesis orally and answer questions about it. The Master’s thesis contains an experimental section, which can either be an analysis of existing research material or an independent research project completed in a laboratory, greenhouse or experimental field, after which you report the results in a scientific thesis. To support the writing and oral presentation of your thesis, you will be offered academic writing courses each year. The Master’s thesis is typically completed within research projects of the department or campus, or as an assignment commissioned by a research institute or company in the field. Upon completion of your thesis, these partners could be potential employers. Ca­reer pro­spects As a graduate of the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences, you will have the competence to pursue a career or to continue your studies at the doctoral level. According to the statistics of the Finnish Association of Academic Agronomists, the current employment situation for new graduates is positive. Graduates have found employment in Finland and abroad as experts in the following fields: Research and product development (universities, research institutes, companies, industry) Administration and expert positions (ministries, supervisory agencies, EU, FAO) Business and management (companies) Teaching, training and consultation (universities, universities of applied sciences, organisations, development cooperation projects) Communication (universities, media, companies, ministries, organisations) Entrepreneurship (self-employment) As a graduate you can apply for doctoral education in Finland or abroad. A doctoral degree can be completed in four years. With a doctoral degree you can pursue a career in the academic world or enter the job market. The qualifications required for some positions may be a doctoral rather than a Master’s degree. The Finnish-language student site (Mitä meistä tulee isona): www.agronomiliitto.fi/opiskelijat/tietoa-opinnoista/Further information about doctoral education at the University of Helsinki: www.helsinki.fi/en/research/doctoral-education In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion International activities take many forms. You can choose from several options: You can go on a student exchange to one of the Faculty’s or University’s partner institutions abroad. Numerous exchange options and programmes are offered both in Europe and farther afield. You can complete a traineeship abroad or in Finland in an international research group. You can select English-language courses offered at the University of Helsinki (Master’s level studies and instruction are in any case primarily available in English). You could serve as a tutor for international students. You can become involved in the international activities of subject organisations or the University’s Student Union. You can also improve your language skills and cultural knowledge by participating in the language courses of the University of Helsinki Language Centre. Exchanges and traineeships abroad are popular because they provide you with new perspectives, skills and contacts, which may prove useful in your studies and in your future career or postgraduate education. Agricultural sciences have a long tradition of hosting international students from many countries. Interacting with these students is a good way to broaden the international dimension of your studies. In addition, student organisations in the discipline organise excursions to destinations outside Finland. The programme uses a number of international textbooks and other teaching materials which provide a connection to the global research community. More information in Finnish about international activities can be found on the Faculty website: www.helsinki.fi/mmtdk/opiskelu/kansainvalisyys/. Net­work­ing The teachers and researchers of the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences engage in active cooperation with companies and organisations in the field. These partners participate in the planning of courses, comment on course contents regarding their topicality and labour market relevance, offer traineeships to students, and commission thesis research from them. They are also potential employers for graduates. The programme’s teachers and researchers also have good contacts with research institutes outside the University, such as the Natural Resources Institute Finland, the Finnish Food Safety Authority, the Finnish Environment Institute, and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Consequently, you will have good opportunities to find traineeships, summer jobs and thesis commissions outside the Viikki Campus. After you graduate, these partners will be your potential employers. The Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences cooperates closely with the other Master’s programmes in the Faculty as well as with other faculties on the Viikki Campus. Cooperation in teaching and research crosses faculty boundaries, so you can choose from a wide variety of courses outside your own programme. Examples of courses available on the campus include environmental sciences, molecular biosciences, food sciences and business economics. Re­search fo­cus University-level teaching is always based on the latest research results. The teaching and research topics of the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences are related to important current themes. As a student of agricultural sciences, you will have the opportunity to seek solutions to these current challenges through actual research projects. Plant production sciences focuses on the sustainability of agriculture and food systems, adaptation to climate change, the identification of new crop plants, the efficiency of nutrient intake, protein self-sufficiency and new sources of plant protein, defence mechanisms against plant diseases, the environmental impacts of production, the preservation of diversity, and the exploitation of genomic information in plant breeding. Animal science examines alternative sources of protein, such as microphytes, insects and new plant proteins, as well as the effect of nutrition on the welfare of animals. Research in animal breeding and biotechnology develops measures to make use of automatically collected large bodies of data and genomic information in the selection of animals with the aim of intensifying animal production in a sustainable manner. Agrotechnology studies the sustainable intensification of production methods, the use of automation, measuring techniques and modelling in production and decision-making, the production and use of renewable energy, as well as the means provided by soil and environmental technology to enhance the recycling of nutrients and manage environmental loading as the climate changes. Environmental soil science focuses on physical, chemical and microbiological processes in the production of clean food and ground water as well as other soil ecosystem services, the utilisation of waste and industrial by-products, the management of environmental loading and the remediation of polluted sites. Clean soil is a precondition for vital biota and material cycling in the ecosystem. [-]

Master in Atmospheric Sciences

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

As a Master of Science graduating from the Programme you will have a strong background of working with environmental issues. You will have the ability to find innovative solutions to complex problems in the field of environmental sciences, climate change and weather forecasting. [+]

Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Not only must further research be done, but industry and business also need environmental specialists with a strong background in natural sciences. As new regulations and European Union directives are adopted in practice, people with knowledge of recent scientific research are required. Upon graduating from the Programme you will have competence in Applying experimental, computational and statistical methods to obtain and analyse atmospheric and environmental data Knowledge applicable to solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication Making systematic and innovative use of investigation or experimentation to discover new knowledge Reporting results in a clear and logical manner The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion All courses are taught in English, although you will also be able to use Finnish or Swedish when appropriate. Pro­gramme con­tents The six study lines are as follows: Aer­o­sol phys­ics Aerosol particles are tiny liquid or solid particles floating in the air. Aerosol physics is essential for our understanding of air quality, climate change and production of nanomaterials. Aerosol scientists investigate a large variety of phenomena associated with atmospheric aerosol particles and related gas-to-particle conversion using constantly improving experimental, theoretical, model-based and data analysis methods. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the most recent theoretical concepts, measurement techniques and computational methods applied in aerosol research. Geo­phys­ics of the hy­dro­sphere Hydrospheric geophysics studies water in all of its forms using physical methods. It includes hydrology, cryology, and physical oceanography. Hydrology includes the study of surface waters such as lakes and rivers, global and local hydrological cycles as well as water resources and geohydrology, the study of groundwater. Cryology focuses on snow and ice phenomena including glacier mass balance and dynamics, sea ice physics, snow cover effects and ground frost. Physical oceanography covers saline water bodies, focusing on describing their dynamics, both large scale circulation and water masses, and local phenomena such as surface waves, upwelling, tides, and ocean acoustics. Scientists study the hydrosphere through field measurements, large and small scale modelling, and formulating mathematical descriptions of the processes. Met­eor­o­logy Meteorology is the physics of the atmosphere. Its best-known application is weather forecasting, but meteorological knowledge is also essential for understanding, predicting and mitigating climate change. Meteorologists study atmospheric phenomena across a wide range of space and time scales using theory, model simulations and observations. The field of meteorology is a forerunner in computing: the development of chaos theory, for example, was triggered by the unexpected behaviour of a meteorological computer model. Meteorology in ATM-MP is further divided into dynamic meteorology and biometeorology. Dynamic meteorology is about large-scale atmospheric dynamics, modelling and observation techniques, whereas biometeorology focuses on interactions between the atmosphere and the underlying surface by combining observations and modelling to study the flows of greenhouse gases and energy with links to biogeochemical cycles, for example. As a graduate of the meteorology line, you will be an expert in atmospheric phenomena who can produce valuable new information and share your knowledge. Biogeo­chem­ical cycles Biogeochemistry studies the processes involved in cycling of elements in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by integrating physics, meteorology, geophysics, chemistry, geology and biology. Besides natural ecosystems, it also studies systems altered by human activity such as forests under different management regimes, drained peatlands, lakes loaded by excess nutrients and urban environments. The most important elements and substances studied are carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, water and phosphorus, which are vital for ecosystem functioning and processes such as photosynthesis. Biogeochemistry often focuses on the interphases of scientific disciplines and by doing so, it also combines different research methods. It treats ecosystems as open entities which are closely connected to the atmosphere and lithosphere. You will thus get versatile training in environmental issues and research techniques. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the functioning of ecosystems and the interactions between ecosystems and the atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere in the context of global change. You will have knowledge applicable for solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication. Re­mote sens­ing Remote sensing allows the collection of information about the atmosphere, oceans and land surfaces. Various techniques are applied for monitoring the state and dynamics of the Earth system from the ground, aircraft or satellites. While Lidar and radar scan from the surface or mounted on aircraft, instruments on polar orbiting or geostationary satellites permit measurements worldwide. In atmospheric sciences remote sensing has found numerous applications such as observations of greenhouse and other trace gases, aerosols, water vapour, clouds and precipitation, as well as surface observations, for example of vegetation, fire activity, snow cover, sea ice and oceanic parameters such as phytoplankton. Synergistic satellite data analysis enables the study of important processes and feedback in the climate system. Remote sensing advances climate research, weather forecasting, air quality studies, aviation safety and the renewable energy industry. As a graduate of the remote sensing line you will have broad expertise in the operational principles of remote sensing instruments as well as methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation. At­mo­spheric chem­istry and ana­lysis Atmospheric chemistry studies the composition and reactions of the molecules that make up the atmosphere, including atmospheric trace constituents and their role in chemical, geological and biological processes, including human influence. The low concentrations and high reactivity of these trace molecules place stringent requirements on the measurement and modelling methods used to study them. Analytical chemistry is the science of obtaining, processing, and communicating information about the composition and structure of matter and plays an essential role in the development of science. Environmental analysis consists of the most recent procedures for sampling, sample preparation and sample analysis and learning how to choose the best analytical methods for different environmental samples. Physical atmospheric chemistry studies focus on the reaction types and reaction mechanisms occurring in the atmosphere, with emphasis on reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and modelling methods. As a graduate of this line you will have understanding of the chemical processes of the atmosphere and the latest environmental analytical methods, so you will have vital skills for environmental research. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor Major subject and study are selected during the first semester of studies. Pro­gramme struc­ture The basic degree in the Programme is the Master of Science (MSc). The scope of the degree is 120 credits (ECTS). As a prerequisite you will need to have a relevant Bachelor’s degree. The possible major subjects are Physics, Meteorology, Geophysics, Chemistry, and Forest Ecology. The programme is designed to be completed in two years. Studies in ATM-MP consist of various courses and project work: lecture courses, seminars, laboratory work and intensive courses. Your first year of studies will consist mainly of lecture courses. During the second year, you must also participate in the seminar course and give a presentation yourself. There is also a project course, which may contain laboratory work, data analysis, or theoretical or model studies. You will have to prepare a short, written report of the project. There are also several summer and winter schools as well as field courses for students in the Programme. Many of the courses take place at the Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in Southern Finland. The intensive courses typically last 5–12 days and include a concise daily programme with lectures, exercises and group work. Thesis Your Master's thesis is the culminating project for the MSc degree, which you will plan and complete independently. The aim of the thesis is to demonstrate your familiarity with scientific methodology, your ability to carry out a demanding project, and your mastery of the conventions of written scientific presentation. The extent of the thesis is 30 credits (ECTS). You will need to agree upon the topic of your thesis in consultation with a professor of the Programme. The topic is usually related to research problems of one of the research groups within the Programme; commonly the group is part of the Division of Atmospheric Sciences. Ca­reer pro­spects There is a global need for experts with multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and environmental issues. Governmental environmental agencies need people who are able to interpret new scientific results as a basis for future legislation. Industry, transportation and businesses need to be able to adapt to new regulations. As a Master of Science graduating from the Programme you will have a strong background of working with environmental issues. You will have the ability to find innovative solutions to complex problems in the field of environmental sciences, climate change and weather forecasting. Graduates of the Programme have found employment in Meteorological Institutes and Environmental Administration in Finland and other countries, companies manufacturing instrumentation for atmospheric and environmental measurements and analysis, and consultancy companies. The Master's degree in ATM-MP also gives you a good background if you intend to proceed to doctoral level studies. Com­pet­ence As a graduate of the meteorology line you will be qualified to use the title of Meteorologist (in Finnish: Meteorologi), as defined by Finnish government decree 1039/2013. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion The Programme offers an international study environment with more than 30% of the students and teaching staff coming from abroad. The ATM-MP is part of a Nordic Nordplus network in Atmosphere-Biosphere Studies, which gives you good opportunities to take courses currently in fourteen Nordic and Baltic universities. There are also several Erasmus agreements with European universities. The PanEurasian Experiment (PEEX) project provides you with opportunities to carry out part of your studies especially in China and Russia. Net­work­ing The programme works in cooperation with research institutes (such as the Finnish Meteorological Institute and Finnish Environment Institute) and industry (such as Vaisala, Airmodus, and Dekati). International and national cooperation with different universities is described above. Re­search fo­cus All the units teaching in the Programme belong to the National Centre of Excellence (FCoE) in Atmospheric Science – From Molecular and Biological processes to the Global Climate (ATM), which is a multidisciplinary team of the Departments of Physics, Forest Sciences and Chemistry at the University of Helsinki, the Department of Applied Physics at the University of Eastern Finland (Kuopio) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The main objective of FCoE ATM is to quantify the feedbacks between the atmosphere and biosphere in a changing climate. The main focus of the research is on investigating the following topics: Understanding the climatic feedbacks and forcing mechanisms related to aerosols, clouds, precipitation and biogeochemical cycles. Developing, refining and utilising the newest measurement and modelling techniques, from quantum chemistry to observations and models of global earth systems. Creating a comprehensive understanding of the role of atmospheric clusters and aerosol particles in regional and global biogeochemical cycles of water, carbon, sulphur, nitrogen and their linkages to atmospheric chemistry. Integrating the results in the context of understanding regional and global Earth systems. In addition to the research focus of FCoE, current research in hydrospheric geophysics at Helsinki University has an emphasis on cryology, with a focus on the effect of aerosols on Indian glaciers, the impact of climate change on the Arctic environment, the dynamics of the Austfonna ice cap in Svalbard, and the winter season in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea [-]

Master in Chemistry and Molecular Sciences

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

A Master’s degree in chemistry qualifies you for expert positions in a wide range of fields, such as industry, research or education. The chemicals industry is a major employer and one of the largest export industries in Finland. Your work could also involve applications of environmental or biological sciences, the manufacture of pharmaceutical products, or the development of technological materials or new energy solutions. In the private sector, your duties might include research and development, quality management, training or commerce. [+]

A Master’s degree in chemistry qualifies you for expert positions in a wide range of fields, such as industry, research or education. The chemicals industry is a major employer and one of the largest export industries in Finland. Your work could also involve applications of environmental or biological sciences, the manufacture of pharmaceutical products, or the development of technological materials or new energy solutions. In the private sector, your duties might include research and development, quality management, training or commerce. Customs and forensic chemists, and chemists working in environmental control, analyse samples as part of their duties. Chemical research often requires interdisciplinary and international cooperation. As a chemist, you can be a part of developing new inventions and serve as an expert in your field and as a connoisseur of natural phenomena! After completing the Master’s Programme in Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, you will: Be profoundly familiar with experimental research methods in one or more fields of chemistry, such as analytical and synthetic chemistry, radiochemistry, molecular research, and spectroscopy. Have an in-depth knowledge of the theoretical basis of your field and be able to apply this knowledge to broader topics. Know how to search for and manage chemical research data and use them to plan and perform demanding duties in chemical laboratories. Be able to act as a chemical expert in project planning and management, both independently and as a member of a team. Be able to present your results accurately in accordance with the practices of the field, both orally and in writing, and prepare extensive papers and reports. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The language of instruction is English. You can also complete courses in Finnish or Swedish, and you can write your Master’s thesis in either English, Finnish or Swedish. Pro­gramme con­tents In the Master’s programme, you will deepen the knowledge and skills acquired during your Bachelor’s degree studies. Depending on your choices, you will familiarise yourself with one or more branches of chemistry and learn modern research methodology. The studies include lecture courses, examinations and contact teaching, laboratory courses, presentation series and seminars. Compared to the Bachelor’s degree, these studies require more independent work. The Master’s degree culminates in an extensive Master’s thesis that includes practical research. You can find further details about the studies in the course catalogue (in Finnish) and on WebOodi. Students are automatically granted admission to the Master’s programme through the Bachelor’s Programme in Chemistry at the University of Helsinki. You can also apply for the programme after completing an applicable Bachelor’s degree in a different programme or university. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor In the Master’s programme, you may select study modules from different special fields of chemistry according to your interests and career goals. You can either complete a broad-ranging degree by selecting studies from several modules or specialise in a specific branch of chemistry. In connection with the Master’s programme operates also the international programme Advanced Spectroscopy in Chemistry, where you have the possibility to apply. You will receive assistance in preparing your personal study plan from your student advisor. Pro­gramme struc­ture The scope of the Master’s Programme in Chemistry and Molecular Sciences is 120 credits and consists of the following: At least 80 credits of advanced studies in chemistry, including a Master’s thesis of 30 credits Other studies so that the scope of the degree is at least 120 credits You can find more details about the studies in the course catalogue (in Finnish) and on WebOodi. Thesis Your final project is the Master’s thesis, the scope of which is 30 credits. It includes a literature review and an experimental or theoretical/computational research component. The scope of the research component can be extended by completing a separate research project. You can complete the research as a member of a research group at the University, outside the University in a research institute or company, or during a student exchange. You must demonstrably complete part of the research yourself and write the entire thesis independently. Ca­reer pro­spects Chemistry is needed in many sectors. Similarly, Master’s studies in chemistry allow you to specialise in many kinds of tasks. In your Master’s degree studies, you will familiarise yourself thoroughly with at least one branch of chemistry, after which you will be qualified to work in demanding expert positions. As a Master’s graduate, you can apply for postgraduate study in a doctoral programme. Approximately one quarter of chemistry graduates continue to complete a doctorate. As a chemical expert you can embark on a career in industry, research or education, or in the business sector. Your work might also involve applications of environmental or biological sciences, the manufacture of pharmaceutical products, or the development of technological materials or new energy solutions. Potential employers include private companies, research and educational institutes, public agencies and supervisory authorities. A traineeship completed during your studies could help you to choose your career. Chemistry is an international field, so there are also plenty of career opportunities abroad and in international organisations. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion An international learning environment: The Master’s Programme in Chemistry and Molecular Sciences accepts students through an international admissions procedure. Lectures are in English. Students of the international Master’s Programme in Advanced Spectroscopy in Chemistry, as well as several exchange students further increase the international scope. In addition, the Department includes several international teachers and researchers. Chemical research is an international effort, and research groups at the University of Helsinki have several international partners. Student exchange: The University of Helsinki has student exchange agreements with several foreign universities, so you can complete part of your degree abroad. Once you have completed your Master’s degree, you can pursue doctoral studies at a foreign university. The Master’s degree in chemistry completed at the University of Helsinki has been certified with the Euromaster® quality label, which guarantees the recognition of the degree at European universities. Language studies: The University of Helsinki offers a wide range of opportunities for improving your language skills. Net­work­ing As a student at the University of Helsinki, you have extensive opportunities to study in different faculties. You can also complete studies at other Finnish universities under the Flexible Study Rights Agreement (JOO). Research in the natural sciences is broad and multidisciplinary in nature. Researchers at the Department of Chemistry have joint projects with several University of Helsinki units as well as research institutes and companies outside the University. These connections allow you to network with various parties in the field of chemistry and related disciplines. In addition, the Department of Chemistry has close connections with several organisations in the field of chemistry, through which you can acquaint yourself with professional chemists and the job market. Key partners include, for example, the Finnish Chemical Society, the Chemical Industry Federation of Finland, various trade organisations and the Finnish Association for Teachers of Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Informatics. Re­search fo­cus Chemical research is multifaceted and extensively covers the methodology of different branches of chemistry. Operations have been divided into three research programmes: Molecular Sciences, Materials Chemistry, and Synthesis and Analysis. In addition, the Finnish Institute for Verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (VERIFIN) operates at the Department. The Unit of Chemistry Teacher Education actively researches the teaching of chemistry and the development of teaching methods. Chemical research methods range from laboratory work to demanding equipment technologies, computational research and modelling. Research projects are often multidisciplinary. Researchers at the Department of Chemistry have joint projects with University units in the fields of, for example, physics, biological sciences, pharmacy and medicine. Other key partners include Aalto University, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and many universities, research institutes and companies in Finland and abroad. [-]

Master in Computer Science

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

In the Master’s programme in computer science you can become an expert in a wide range of fields. You will have access to the focus areas of research in computer science at the University of Helsinki: algorithms, distributed or networked systems, and software engineering. You will gain lasting professional skills for specialist, design, or managerial posts in the corporate world, or for research and doctoral education, since the Master’s programme in computer science gives you the aptitude for both independent working and multidisciplinary teamwork. [+]

Computer science has a brilliant future! You could help to create new network solutions, build the future digital society, develop secure digital services, or be involved in a ground-breaking international software project. Perhaps you will develop algorithms for utilising genome data in medicine or optimise bus routes using positioning data. Do you wonder about all the things that can be automated? Or would you like to dig deeper and become a researcher? In the Master’s programme in computer science you can become an expert in a wide range of fields. You will have access to the focus areas of research in computer science at the University of Helsinki: algorithms, distributed or networked systems, and software engineering. You will gain lasting professional skills for specialist, design, or managerial posts in the corporate world, or for research and doctoral education, since the Master’s programme in computer science gives you the aptitude for both independent working and multidisciplinary teamwork. This education will give you: The ability to advance your knowledge in the different areas of computer science The skill to seek, assess, and analyse scientific information in your own area of expertise, and apply the methods of the field in an ethical and sustainable way The ability to act as expert in the field, and to develop the practices and methods of your field in cooperation with specialists from other fields Oral and written communication skills in an international work environment The quality teaching within the computer science programme at the University of Helsinki has been highlighted repeatedly in national and international teaching assessments. The student-centred, in-depth learning gives you a solid basis for life-long learning. Studying at the leading research unit for computer science in Finland offers you constant interaction with current research and insight into the development patterns in the field. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion Instruction can be given in English or Finnish. Within these sub-programmes, instruction is nearly always in English: Algorithms Networking and Services Within the following sub-programme, some of the instruction is given in Finnish, but it is also possible to graduate with teaching in English: Software systems You can take exams in English, Finnish or Swedish (unless the nature of the course demands otherwise), and you can write your Master’s thesis in Finnish, Swedish or English. Pro­gramme con­tents In future, we will increasingly be using intelligent tools, consisting of networked hardware, software, services, and data. They will work based on intelligent, learning algorithms, data streams carried by communication protocols, and global infrastructures. Within the Algorithms sub-programme, you will study effective algorithms and their application within other disciplines and in corporate life. Future IT systems will contain more and more intelligent components, the function of which will be based on complex mathematical models created automatically with the aid of machine-learning methods. The problems to be solved are computationally challenging, and the ever increasing amounts of data will create their own challenges when it comes to the efficiency of the algorithms needed. The Networking and services sub-programme educates you to become an expert and strategic leader in the design and management of new global infrastructures. The infrastructures include Internet technologies in fixed networks and mobile environments, as well as the information and service networks built on top of them. Focus areas include the theory, data security, and trust within distributed systems, interactive systems, and the adaptability of services in a changing environment. The Software systems sub-programme introduces you to the design and implementation of advanced software. The development of a shared software framework or platform for several software products is very demanding both technically and from the development project viewpoint. Developing such software requires technical skills, but also team- and project work, quality assurance, and communication. Within this sub-programme, you can specialise in software engineering, software technology, or information management, and study the current research questions in these areas in depth. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor The sub-programmes in the Master’s programme for computer science are: Algorithms Networking and services Software systems You can select any of these programmes according to your preferences at the beginning of your studies. The sub-programme determines which courses you should take. Pro­gramme struc­ture The Master’s programme comprises 120 credits, which can be completed in two years, in accordance with an approved personal study plan. The degree includes: 80 credits of advanced courses, including Shared courses within the programme Courses within the programme which support the thesis topic The Master’s thesis (Pro gradu), 30 credits 40 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes The other courses can include a work-orientation period Thesis The advanced module in the Master of Science degree includes a thesis (30 credits). In this project you demonstrate your ability for scientific thinking, your grasp of research methods, your in-depth knowledge of the thesis topic, and your aptitude for scientific written communication. Some common types of theses are the literature-based comparison or analysis, and the experimental or constructive application. All theses demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the research literature within the writer’s own field, and command of the communication style prevalent in computer science publications. Some of the theses are written in collaboration with research groups at the department, so you may be able to participate in top research even before completing your degree. Due to the breadth of the field and its impact on society, the thesis topics range over many themes. Recent thesis topics have included cloud computing, big data, management of large genome data, machine learning, service- and model-based solutions, software development methods, and software quality assurance. Ca­reer pro­spects The employment outlook within the field is excellent. Masters of computer science find varied positions within the ICT field, both as employees and entrepreneurs. The nature of the education is also geared towards giving you an aptitude for managerial posts. All the sub-programmes provide the qualifications to find employment in a wide variety of jobs. Software-system graduates often start their careers as software developers and designers, while network graduates often start with software at the infrastructure level (such as data communications, computation, or data entry). The skills learned in the algorithms sub-programme enable you to work on challenging tasks in various fields. As a graduate you can find employment within small or large corporations as well as organisations in the private, public, or third sector. Due to the global nature of the field, you can find employment anywhere in the world. Taking modules from other education programmes will help you apply your computer science skills in other areas. Many jobs are based on these combinations. Thanks to its strong scientific basis, the degree is also an excellent springboard to a doctoral programme. Com­pet­ence A Master's degree gives eligibility to apply to positions that require a second cycle academic degree. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion There is a very international atmosphere within the programme, as nearly a third of the students come from abroad, and the advanced courses are instructed by international researchers. In addition, the University of Helsinki and the Faculty of Science offer you many opportunities for international activities: Instruction in English within other education programmes International tasks within the students’ organisations or union Language courses at the Language Centre of the University of Helsinki You can also get information and counselling about independent international experience, such as: Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university Traineeships abroad Computer science at the University of Helsinki is a popular exchange location, especially from Germany. Some 5-10 students come annually; exchange students have come from 14 countries in recent years. The students in the department have taken exchange periods in 16 countries in the past few years. Net­work­ing In the Faculty of Science, your course opportunities are not limited to the modules offered by your own education programme. You can choose courses from other programmes, both within your own faculty and from the university’s other faculties. The teaching within the data science and the Life Science Informatics Master’s programmes is designed in close cooperation with the computer science Master’s programme. Thanks to the flexible study rights agreement (the JOO), you can also take courses at other Finnish universities, so it is easy to tailor your degree according to your interests and career plans. Contacts with working life are important at every stage of the programme. Many computer science students work alongside their studies, and can incorporate this experience in their degrees through the trainee section of the degree. You can develop your own business idea during the university’s entrepreneur courses and at Think Company, which is a new kind of meeting place for students and researchers interested in starting companies, as well as corporate partners in various fields. In addition, you can participate in research projects through thesis and seminar work, i.e. concrete research work. Writing your MSc thesis in cooperation with a corporation or research organisation is also a good way to improve your working-life abilities. Computer science at the University of Helsinki participates in the Luma network, spreading programming and digital-society skills to school pupils and the public. The work within Luma includes educating science teachers in computer science to meet schools’ teaching needs. Clubs and camps offer teaching experience in the field to computer science students and teaching students, as well as teachers gaining complementary training. Computer science at the University of Helsinki has considerable collaboration with corporations in the fields of networks, data security, data science, etc. Within the field of data security there is the Intel Collaborative Research Institute (ICRI-SC); the Nokia Centre for Advanced Research (NCAR) was established in spring 2016 to promote research on data science and networks. The Helsinki Institute for Information Technology (HIIT) is a joint research institute of the University of Helsinki and Aalto University, which supports and coordinates research collaboration within the field of computer science. The research in computer science in the Helsinki region gains considerable added value and international impact through this collaboration. Re­search fo­cus There are several multidisciplinary research projects under way at the Faculty of Science, which are being carried out in cooperation with the research institutes on the science campus and with other faculties, universities, and corporations. The role of computer science within these projects is to develop the basic methods of the discipline in strategic areas and to collaborate in depth with other disciplines. The sub-programmes within the Master’s programme cover a considerable part of the strategic focus areas of computer science research at the University of Helsinki: algorithms, data analysis and machine learning, networking and services, software systems, bioinformatics, and data science. Computer science is part of three Finnish Academy centres of excellence: for computational inference, inversion problems, and cancer genetics. These units represent the collaboration between computer science and other disciplines. Computer science has coordinated the long-lived Algodan centre of excellence, which has been the basis for many current research groups. [-]

Master in Data Science

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

In the Data Science master’s programme, you will gain a solid understanding of the methods used in data science. You will learn not only to apply data science: you will acquire insight into how and why methods work so you will be able to construct solutions to new challenges in data science. In the Data Science master’s programme, you will also be able to work on problems specific to a scientific discipline and to combine domain knowledge with the latest data analysis methods and tools. The teachers of the programme are themselves active data science researchers, and the programme is heavily based on first-hand research experience. [+]

Data science combines computer science and statistics to solve exciting data-intensive problems in industry and in many fields of science. Data scientists help organisations make sense of their data. As data is collected and analysed in all areas of society, demand for professional data scientists is high and will grow higher. The emerging Internet of Things, for instance, will produce a whole new range of problems and opportunities in data analysis. In the Data Science master’s programme, you will gain a solid understanding of the methods used in data science. You will learn not only to apply data science: you will acquire insight into how and why methods work so you will be able to construct solutions to new challenges in data science. In the Data Science master’s programme, you will also be able to work on problems specific to a scientific discipline and to combine domain knowledge with the latest data analysis methods and tools. The teachers of the programme are themselves active data science researchers, and the programme is heavily based on first-hand research experience. Upon graduating from the Data Science MSc programme, you will have solid knowledge of the central concepts, theories, and research methods of data science as well as applied skills. In particular, you will be able to Understand the general computational and probabilistic principles underlying modern machine learning and data mining algorithms Apply various computational and statistical methods to analyse scientific and business data Assess the suitability of each method for the purpose of data collection and use Implement state-of-the-art machine learning solutions efficiently using high-performance computing platforms Undertake creative work, making systematic use of investigation or experimentation, to discover new knowledge Report results in a clear and understandable manner Analyse scientific and industrial data to devise new applications and support decision making. The MSc programme is offered jointly by the Department of Computer Science, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and the Department of Physics, with support from the Helsinki Institute for Information Technology (HIIT) and the Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP), all located on the Kumpula Science campus. In your applied data science studies you can also include multidisciplinary studies from other master's programmes, such as digital humanities, and natural and medical sciences. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion All teaching is in English. You can also take exams and complete work, such as your Master's thesis, in Finnish or Swedish. Pro­gramme con­tents The Data Science MSc programme combines elements from computer science and mathematical sciences to provide you with skills in topics such as machine learning, distributed systems and statistical methods. You might also find that knowledge in a particular scientific field is useful for your future career. You can obtain this through elective studies in the MSc programme, or it might already be part of your bachelor-level degree. Studies in the Data Science MSc programme include both theoretical and practical components, including a variety of study methods (lectures, exercises, projects, seminars; done both individually and in groups). Especially in applied data science, we also use problem-based learning methods, so that you can address real-world issues. You will also practise academic skills such as scientific writing and oral presentation throughout your studies. You are encouraged to include an internship in your degree in order to obtain practical experience in the field. Elective studies give you a wider perspective of Data Science. Your elective studies can be an application area of Data Science (such as physics or the humanities), a discipline that supports application of Data Science (such as language technology), or a methodological subject needed for the development of new Data Science methods and models (such as computer science, statistics, or mathematics). Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor You can specialise either in the core areas of data science -- algorithms, infrastructure and statistics -- or in its applications. This means that you can focus on the development of new models and methods in data science, supported by the data science research carried out at the University of Helsinki; or you can become a data science specialist in an application field by incorporating studies in another subject. In addition to mainstream data science topics, the programme offers two largely unique opportunities for specialisation: the data science computing environment and infrastructure, and data science in natural sciences, especially physics. Pro­gramme struc­ture You should be able to complete the MSc Programme in Data Science of 120 credits (ECTS) in two years of full-time study. The programme consists of Common core studies of basic data science courses Several modules on specific topics within data science algorithms, data science infrastructures and statistical data science, and on data science tools Seminars and colloquia Courses on academic skills and tools Possibly an internship in a research group or company Studies in an application domain Master’s thesis (30 credits) Thesis The programme includes a mandatory Master’s thesis. Your Master’s thesis will focus on a data science problem and on applying the knowledge you have learned during your MSc courses to solve that problem. The problem you address can be theoretical or practical in nature, but your thesis work must always have a research component and a scientific basis. In your thesis you will demonstrate your ability to think scientifically, your command of research methods, your familiarity with the subject of study, and your aptitude for written scientific communication. Your thesis should contain a definition of the research questions, a review of the relevant literature, and theoretical, constructive or empirical parts developing answers to your research questions. You will have a supervisor appointed to oversee your thesis. You and your supervisor will have regular meetings to ensure that your work is progressing smoothly and on schedule. The thesis is worth 30 credits, roughly corresponding to one semester of full-time studies. Although your thesis is independent work, you can often write it as part of a research group. You might also be able to write your thesis for a company as long as you fulfil the academic criteria described above. You can discuss these issues with your supervisor. Ca­reer pro­spects Industry and science are flooded with data and are struggling to make sense of it. There is urgent demand for individuals trained to analyse data, including massive and heterogeneous data. For this reason, the opportunities are expected to grow dramatically. The interdisciplinary Data Science MSc programme will train you to work in data-intensive areas of industry and science, with the skills and knowledge needed to construct solutions to complex data analysis problems. If you are focusing on the core areas of data science, you will typically find employment as a researcher or consultant, sometimes after taking a PhD in Computer Science or Statistics to deepen your knowledge of the field and research methods. If your focus is on the use of data science for specific applications, you will typically find work in industry or in other fields of science such as physics, digital humanities, biology or medicine. Com­pet­ence A Master's degree gives eligibility to apply to positions that require a second cycle academic degree i.e. a Master’s level degree. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion The Data Science MSc is an international programme, with students from around the world and an international research environment. All of the departments taking part in the programme are internationally recognised for their research and a significant fraction of the teaching and research staff come from abroad. The departments participate in international student exchange programmes and offer you the chance to include international experience as part of your degree. Data Science itself is an international field, so once you graduate you can apply for jobs in any country. In the programme, all courses are in English. Although the Helsinki area is quite cosmopolitan and English is widely spoken, you can also take courses to learn Finnish at the University of Helsinki Language Centre. The Language Centre also offers an extensive programme of foreign language courses for those interested in learning other languages. Net­work­ing Education in the programme is multidisciplinary, combining the expertise of the Department of Computer Science, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, the Department of Physics, the Helsinki Institute for Information Technology (HIIT) and the Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP). The University of Helsinki offers a huge variety of possibilities for elective studies with which you can complement your data science expertise. For example, you can take advantage of courses offered by the MSc Programme in Life Science Informatics. Collaboration with Aalto University, through the joint institutes HIIT and HIP, gives you further opportunities. Teaching in the programme is based on research carried out in the above-mentioned departments and institutes, often in collaboration with other fields of science, as well as with industry. Particle physics data analysis, for instance, is carried out in collaboration with CERN. An example of industrial cooperation is the Nokia Center for Advanced Research, a joint research centre between the University of Helsinki, Aalto University, and Nokia. Re­search fo­cus The MSc programme in Data Science is offered jointly by three departments and two research institutes. Their research covers a wide spectrum of the many aspects of data science. At a very general level, the focal areas are Machine learning and data mining Distributed computation and computational infrastructures Statistical modelling and analysis Studies in the programme are tightly connected to research carried out in the participating departments and institutes. [-]

Master in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

In the master's degree program, you can become familiar with a wide variety of topics in three areas: ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation biology. You can choose studies from any of these areas, as well as from other master's degree programmes. The programme is diverse and multidisciplinary: teaching is done with lectures, laboratory and computer training courses, interactive seminars, study tours and field courses. The field courses range from the northern subarctic region to tropical rainforests. [+]

Ecology and evolutionary biology offer a perspective on biology from the level of genes to communities of species. In the master's degree program, you can become familiar with a wide variety of topics in three areas: ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation biology. You can choose studies from any of these areas, as well as from other master's degree programmes. The programme is diverse and multidisciplinary: teaching is done with lectures, laboratory and computer training courses, interactive seminars, study tours and field courses. The field courses range from the northern subarctic region to tropical rainforests. Our wide expertise extends from molecular ecology to population and community biology. The Centres of Excellence of Metapopulation Biology and Biological Interactions are located in our department. Our programme offers you a wide range of options: evolutionary biology or genetics for those interested in ecological genetics and genomics, as well as the ability to take advantage of the high-quality molecular ecology and systematics laboratory; conservation biology for those interested in regional or global environmental problems; and ecological modelling skills for those interested in computational biology. Our training also offers Behavioural Ecology. Ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation biology are not only fascinating topics for basic research, they also have a key role in addressing global environmental challenges. Upon graduating from the Master's degree in ecology and evolutionary biology programme, you will: Have mastered the main theories and methods in ecology and evolutionary biology and be able to apply them to practical problems Be able to plan and carry out a scientific research project Have read the relevant scientific literature and be able to utilise your expertise in different types of work Be able to work as an expert in your field Be able to to write good scientific English Be able to work in research projects and groups Be able to continue on to doctoral studies The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The Master’s Programme in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology is a genuinely international programme that brings together students from many countries. The language of instruction for compulsory courses and most optional courses is English. You can write all exams, reports and your Master’s thesis in English. If you are fluent in Finnish or Swedish, you can also use these languages. Pro­gramme con­tents The Master's degree program includes studies of ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation biology. The studies are organised in modules. You can affect the content of the studies by planning your personal curriculum. You can study the following themes: Ecology studies the abundance and distribution of species (animals, plants, microbes) and the interactions among them and with the environment. The perspective ranges from the molecular to the ecosystem level. In ecology, a central question is: Why are some species able to invade new habitats and displace native species? Which species are able to adapt to environmental change or migrate with the changing climate, and which species will become extinct? Evolutionary biology examines the processes which support biodiversity on its various levels (genes – individuals – populations – species – ecosystems). You will learn about the theory of evolution and how to use population genetics and genomics methods in researching evolutionary issues. Conservation Biology studies the depletion of biodiversity, its causes and consequences. You will learn to apply ecological theory to the problems of environmental conservation, to assess the effectiveness of methods of conservation, as well as to resolve the problems relating to conservation e.g. by modelling and computational methods. The training emphasizes the importance of interdisciplinary education in the area of conservation. Pro­gramme struc­ture You undertake modules producing a total of 120 credits (ECTS) according to your personal study plan. The degree consists of: 60 credits of advanced studies, including a research project (Master’s thesis, 30 credits) 60 credits of other studies chosen from the Programme or from other Programmes Career planning or extracurricular activities can be included in your personal study plan. If you are studying to qualify as a biology teacher, you will need 60 credits of pedagogical studies in your degree. This applies only to Finnish or Swedish speaking students. Thesis All students undertake a master's thesis, the extent of which is 30 credits. In your thesis, you will demonstrate your mastery of scientific thinking, your familiarity with the scientific background of your thesis and the relevant research methods, and your ability to report the results. Your thesis can be done individually or as a member of a research project in which you have a clear and independent role. You must, however, write your thesis independently. In general, you will collect the data in the field or in the laboratory, analyse them, evaluate the results critically in the light of the scientific literature, and present your conclusions in writing. Your Master's thesis can be done in one of the the research groups of the department. A Master's degree in ecology and evolutionary biology gives you the capability to embark on a wide range of careers, such as University teaching and research tasks; expert and administrative tasks at research centres and companies; in the field of public administration (e.g., the United Nations, the European Union, national and provincial administration, cities, municipalities); international and national organisations; and the media. The degree also makes you eligible to continue on to a doctoral education in different areas of biology. The Master’s degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology is a popular option for Finnish and Swedish speaking students wanting to qualify as biology teachers. Ca­reer pro­spects Master's degree in ecology and evolutionary biology gives an access to the capability of University teaching and research tasks, for a wide range of expert and administrative tasks of the various research centres, companies, in the field of public administration (e.g., The UNITED NATIONS, the European Union, the State and the provincial administration, cities, municipalities), international and national organizations and the media. The degree also provides the scientific validity for doctoral education in different areas of biology. The Master’s degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology is a well-liked option among students studying towards biology teacher qualification (Finnish and Swedish speaking students). Com­pet­ence Upon graduating with a Master’s degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, you can qualify to become a teacher in biology. This requires that you have been accepted to the faculty for teacher’s education. You must have taken the following courses during your studies for your Bachelor’s degree: biology and another discipline from the following: geography, chemistry, physics, mathematics or health education. If you want to qualify as a biology teacher in the Master’s degree programme, you must take pedagogical studies as your optional studies (60 credits; separate selection procedure during studies). In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion You will have the opportunity to study at foreign universities and research institutions within the framework of an international student exchange. You can also gain valuable experience by working as a tutor of international students or participating in the international activities of the Student Union or other student organisations. The teachers and researchers in the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology are internationally known and respected. Their research groups host numerous international researchers as visitors and workers. They also employ many foreign graduate students, which creates an international atmosphere in the programme. Net­work­ing The researchers and teachers carry out diverse collaboration with the Helsinki University Museum of natural history (LUOMUS), the Institute of Biotechnology, various Finnish universities, Metsähallitus (Forestry Administration), Natural Resource Institute Finland (LUKE), as well as the Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE). These agencies, as well as our own research groups, employ a significant number of students. Part of the research and instruction takes place at the University of Helsinki’s research stations in Tvärminne, Lammi and Kilpisjärvi, located on the southern coast, in central Finland, and in Lapland, respectively. Re­search fo­cus The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology has a number of internationally renowned research groups in the following areas: Metapopulation research Population ecology Conservation biology Evolutionary biology Ecological genetics and genomics You can see more information here: www.helsinki.fi/biotieteet/ekologiajaevoluutiobiologia/tutkimus. [-]

Master in Environmental Change and Global Sustainability

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Global socio-ecological problems call for multidisciplinary solutions that transcend the usual boundaries of science and decision-making. The Environmental Change and Global Sustainability (ECGS) Master’s programme trains you in wide-ranging interdisciplinary thinking skills and provides you with the ability to study environmental and sustainability issues in your respective fields of expertise and solve problems of socio-ecological sustainability in cooperation with various social actors. [+]

Global socio-ecological problems call for multidisciplinary solutions that transcend the usual boundaries of science and decision-making. The Environmental Change and Global Sustainability (ECGS) Master’s programme trains you in wide-ranging interdisciplinary thinking skills and provides you with the ability to: Study environmental and sustainability issues in your respective fields of expertise and Solve problems of socio-ecological sustainability in cooperation with various social actors. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The ECGS Master’s programme is taught in English. All assignments, exams and dissertations can be done in English, as well as in Finnish and Swedish. Pro­gramme con­tents ECGS is a truly multidisciplinary Master’s programme. It covers an introductory Core Module common to all students, followed by two distinct study tracks. The introductory Core Module focuses on the methodologies of environmental and sustainability science as well as the interactions between science and society. The Core Module also offers a pool of optional methodological studies, providing you with the necessary research tools to tackle socio-ecological challenges. If your orientation is in natural sciences, the Environmental Change study line can provide you with an understanding of the functioning of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and can give guidance toward their sustainable use. If your interests are more in the social sciences and humanities, on the other hand, the Global Sustainability study line provides an understanding of the socio-cultural underpinnings of global sustainability challenges so that you can help to develop solutions that take social and environmental justice into consideration. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor You can apply for one of the two study tracks in the ECGS Master’s programme: the Environmental Change study line or the Global Sustainability study line. You can refine your expertise in your chosen study line by choosing from study modules related to your specialised field of science or from interdisciplinary phenomenon-based modules. Environmental Change modules are offered in, for example, the following research fields: aquatic sciences, soil and earth sciences, environmental ecology, environmental biotechnology and agroecology. Global Sustainability modules include themes such as environmental and natural resource economics, environmental policy, development studies, public and social policy, consumer research, forest policy and economics, and development geography. ECGS also offers a variety of modules integrating both natural and social scientific perspectives including phenomenon-based modules on the Baltic Sea and the Arctic as well as a variety of interdisciplinary fields such as climate change, food and consumption systems, urban studies and socio-ecological systems studies. As an international applicant, you will be assessed and accepted for the Master’s program based on the scientific relevance of your bachelor’s degree and your success in previous studies. Pro­gramme struc­ture You will graduate with a Master’s degree in Science (M.Sc.) or Social Sciences (M.Soc.Sc.). Your Master’s degree (120 credits, ECTS) will consist of the following studies: Advanced studies, 60 credits, including your Master’s thesis (30 credits) Other studies, 60 credits, including 30 credits of Core Module studies and 30 credits of elective science specific studies from either ECGS modules or other relevant Master’s programs. Thesis During your second year you will write an individual Master’s thesis of about 50–80 pages (30 credits). The Master’s thesis is a proving ground there you demonstrate your capabilities in scientific thinking, methodological research and scientific communication and writing. During the writing process you will also attend a Master’s thesis seminar headed and instructed by a faculty member with expertise in your particular field. Ca­reer pro­spects The interdisciplinary ECGS Master’s program provides you with a unique education which is widely applicable for a future career path. Upon graduating from ECGS you will have sufficient expertise in environmental sciences, sustainability sciences and environmental policy to act as a specialist in the public, private and third sectors, and you will have gained essential skills to undertake a career in sustainable business and communication. The Master’s program prepares you to advance to doctoral level studies and thereafter positions in environment-related research. ECGS has a multidisciplinary learning community with faculty from a wide range of sciences, accommodating students in a multicultural network with excellent career prospects. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion The ECGS Master’s program, taught in English, trains you to tackle environmental challenges which transcend national borders. The faculty encourage international interaction and the programme promotes a vibrant multicultural atmosphere. You can also include a student exchange in your Master’s level studies. Net­work­ing ECGS is built on a strong connection between the Helsinki university campuses. Since sustainable development is a strategic objective of the University of Helsinki, the university continues to strengthen its cooperation with other universities (such as Aalto University), the Finnish Environment Institute, the National Resource Institute Finland and a variety of collaborating organisations. Re­search fo­cus Socio-cognitive aspects of sustainability Behavioural analysis of energy transitions Participatory methods in natural resource policy Regulation of nanomaterials and endocrine disrupters Knowledge integration in environmental and technology policy Ecological and economical modelling of renewable natural resources The Baltic sea, agriculture and the environment Climate and energy policy and adaptations to climate change Sustainable food production and consumption Lake and marine ecosystems and research on related environmental problems (eutrophication, overfishing, oil accidents) and solutions (sustainable use, rehabilitation and management) Urban ecosystem research, urban environmental policy and urban change Paleoecology and environmental change, responses of plants to air pollution and climatic factors in terrestrial ecosystems Nitrogen aware agriculture: soil health, biological nitrogen fixation, terrestrial nitrogen cycles and pulses in food chains Environmental biotechnology and ecosystems ecology For further information, please acquaint yourself with our researchers' topical work at: blogs.helsinki.fi/jahukkin/research-group blogs.helsinki.fi/yle-ere/en blogs.helsinki.fi/soilman-uh urbanecology.fi [-]

Master in European and Nordic Studies

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Understanding Europe today requires much more than understanding the process of European integration. The tensions, challenges and possibilities that are manifesting themselves today have their roots in a longer political, social and cultural history. This programme takes you to these roots. A multidisciplinary study path introduces you to various aspects of European society, culture and politics. Along the way, it draws from the strengths of Nordic research on Europe, with its strong focus on regional cooperation, diversity, identities, institutions, culture and the politics of history and memory. You will get to know the Nordic countries from a European perspective and Europe from a Nordic perspective. [+]

Understanding Europe today requires much more than understanding the process of European integration. The tensions, challenges and possibilities that are manifesting themselves today have their roots in a longer political, social and cultural history. This programme takes you to these roots. A multidisciplinary study path introduces you to various aspects of European society, culture and politics. Along the way, it draws from the strengths of Nordic research on Europe, with its strong focus on regional cooperation, diversity, identities, institutions, culture and the politics of history and memory. You will get to know the Nordic countries from a European perspective and Europe from a Nordic perspective. Studying the ways in which Europeans cooperate, how European states and societies are interconnected, and how they are governed, forms an important part of the programme. Besides looking at the processes of integration and the evolution and functioning of the European Union, the programme highlights the significance of regional cooperation in the Nordic context, the EU’s relations with its neighbours and its place in the global system. At the end of your studies, you will have gained a broad understanding of European issues and acquired advanced research skills. You will be ready to work in a wide range of expert positions that require independent and creative thinking, in both the public and private sectors. The programme consists of joint courses and specialisation studies. One of the available options is to specialise in Nordic Studies. ENS is the only Nordic Studies programme taught in English in the Nordic countries. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 13,000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The language of instruction is English. At least 75% of the degree must be completed fully in English (including seminars, seminar papers and similar written work, exams and the Master’s thesis). However, you can also study in other languages. You can include, for example, a semester abroad or courses taught in Finnish or Swedish. Pro­gramme con­tents The programme consists of a multidisciplinary selection of courses that introduce you to various aspects of Europe, the Nordic countries, and the Baltic Sea Region. The topics addressed in the joint courses include, for example, contemporary European politics, cooperation and conflict in European history, Nordic societies and cultures, and institutions, ideologies and identities in Europe. You will also learn about nations and nationalism, political and social protest, (Nordic) welfare models, the European Union and Nordic cooperation, European legal traditions, and the politics of memory. The programme involves substantial interaction between you and your teachers. You will complete several writing assignments and research papers along the way, culminating in a Master’s thesis in your second year. Some courses use active learning or flipped classroom pedagogy. The content of your studies also depends on your own choices. In addition to core courses that provide you with a deep multidisciplinary understanding of Europe, the degree includes specialisation studies of your own choosing. If you specialise in Nordic studies, you will have access to some courses taught at the programme for Nordic Literature and the Kultur och Kommunikation Master’s programme. You also have plenty of other options. The University of Helsinki is a large research university. As a student in ENS you will have access to a rich variety of specialised courses in many faculties and schools. Check the section on research focus to see what we are particularly good at in Helsinki. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor The programme has two study tracks (see the structure of studies below for more information): Humanities study track – This study track emphases regional and cultural studies, and history. Upon completion of the programme, you will receive the Master of Arts degree. Political science study track – This study track is oriented towards political science, political history and the European legal tradition. At the end of the programme, you have earned the Master of Social Sciences degree. Pro­gramme struc­ture The extent of the Master´s programme is 120 credits (ECTS) to be completed in two academic years. The studies are divided into four main parts: Joint courses (core courses that are common to all students in this programme) Study track-specific studies (core courses that are separate for the humanities and political sciences study tracks) Specialisation studies (that you choose yourself) Master’s thesis and supporting seminars Thesis During your second year of study, you will work on an extensive independent research work, your Master’s thesis, on a topic that relates to European and/or Nordic studies. The length of the study will usually be about 60-80 pages. You can choose the topic for yourself, but you should work out a research plan together with your supervisor, who will advise you during your Master’s thesis project. You will also regularly present your progress in a Master’s thesis seminar with your fellow students. Upon completing the thesis, you will have gained experience on how to conduct an independent research project and report your research findings. You will be expected to demonstrate that you can formulate relevant and interesting research questions, create a coherent research plan, produce and analyse data, and write a scientific research report. Ca­reer pro­spects The programme will train you as an independent and critical thinker who is well informed about European issues, trained to do independent and creative analytical projects, and experienced in working in a multicultural English-speaking environment. There is currently a great need for professionals like this within the public and private sectors. The programme will provide you with the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue a career in higher education, local and national administrations, the media, the European Union, Nordic Regional and international institutions, non-governmental organisations, and the business sector. European studies graduates from the University of Helsinki have begun careers for example in the European Commission, European Parliament, Committee of Regions, Pro-European NGOs, College of Europe, communication offices, and associations promoting Nordic cooperation. You will meet some potential future employees, as well as alumni from our university, in the career course we organise for you. You will also have the opportunity to complete an internship during your studies. If you are interested in pursuing a career in academic research, the programme provides you with high quality research training. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion You will be living and learning in an international and multicultural environment with students and staff from all over the world. It is also possible to spend a semester abroad as an exchange student at one of Faculty’s numerous partner universities or include a traineeship abroad as part of your degree programme. Net­work­ing The programme is coordinated by the Network of European Studies at the University of Helsinki (NES), in close cooperation with the Centre for Nordic Studies (CENS) and a wide range of disciplines in the field of the humanities and social sciences. The University of Helsinki is part of Europeaum, an association of leading European research universities that provide teaching in the field of European studies, and is also its only Nordic member. As a Master’s degree student here, you will have access to seminars and courses organised by Europaeum, including a substantial subsidy covering most of your travel costs. The University of Helsinki is also part in a Nordic capital universities network and is building a strategic partnership with Stockholm University. In addition, our strong Nordic networks also enable you to benefit from teacher exchanges, bilateral courses (blended on-line and classroom teaching) and excursions. We offer a wide selection of excellent opportunities for you to include semester abroad as part of your studies. Re­search fo­cus The European studies programme covers a wide spectrum of research projects in various faculties and research institutes. In recent years, the focus has been especially on studying boundaries, regions and identities in Europe, different narratives of Europe, European legal traditions, the construction of post-Cold War Europe, the politics of memory, and political violence in post-war Europe. The university also offers a wide selection of teaching in English in Central and Eastern European studies. Many of these themes are also strongly present in the field of Nordic studies. This field has traditionally had a distinctly European flavour. Research projects in recent years have, for example, focused on imagology of the European North and South, Nordic welfare state/ism, the politics of neutrality, and Nordic cooperation in a global comparative perspective. 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Master in Forest Sciences

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

The Master’s Programme in Forest Sciences offers a broad and versatile perspective on forests and their use. The studies focus on and apply knowledge in biology, business economics, environmental sciences, logistics, geoinformatics and information technology. As a graduate in forest sciences you will be a professional in forest ecology, the management and use of forest resources, forest bioeconomy business and policy, with ample career opportunities in Finland and abroad. [+]

Do you want to affect the future of forests, a key natural resource and the wellspring of biodiversity? Have you ever wondered why forests are called the lungs of the Earth and how climate change relates to forests? Or how trees are grown and processed into products in a sustainable and efficient manner? And how are the economy and forests interrelated? You can find answers to these questions when you study forest sciences. You will come to view forests not only as a setting for jogging trails or as a source of wood, but rather as a source of versatile renewable resources and as complex ecological systems that are closely connected to their environment. The relationship between humans and nature and between society and natural resources is a strong feature of these studies. The Master’s Programme in Forest Sciences offers a broad and versatile perspective on forests and their use. The studies focus on and apply knowledge in biology, business economics, environmental sciences, logistics, geoinformatics and information technology. As a graduate in forest sciences you will be a professional in forest ecology, the management and use of forest resources, forest bioeconomy business and policy, with ample career opportunities in Finland and abroad. Come and study forest sciences at the University of Helsinki, in one of the world’s foremost degree programmes in the field. For more information in Finnish about studies in forest sciences, the field of forestry and its opportunities, see www.metsatieteet.fi. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The language of instruction is either Finnish or English. In all courses, you can choose to complete your examinations and presentations, as well as your Master’s thesis, in Finnish or Swedish. Pro­gramme con­tents General studies in the Master’s programme provide you with skills needed for the academic world and the labour market. In advanced studies, you focus on field-specific issues and develop your professional knowledge when writing your Master’s thesis and completing courses in your field of specialisation. In addition, the studies include elective courses that allow you to diversify and deepen your knowledge. The Master's Programme in Forest Sciences comprises three study tracks: forest ecology, the management and use of forest resources and forest bioeconomy business and policy. These study tracks include a total of 12 fields of specialisation. The specialisations in forest ecology focus on various types of forest and peatland ecosystems and their exploitation. Topical issues include climate change, the prevention of damage to forests caused by insects and fungi, the control of game populations, and problems related to the exploitation of tropical forests. The specialisations in the management and use of forest resources examine the planning of forest use and the relevant collection of information, forest inventory models, wood harvesting and logistics as well as the processing of wood into bioeconomy products. Topical issues include the application of new remote sensing methods in the planning of forest resource management, the combination of different values and targets in forestry and bioeconomy, various models of silviculture, increased efficiency in logging and transportation, and generating added value in all areas of biorefining. Studies in the business economics of forest bioeconomy are based on the sustainable use of a renewable natural resource and on the development of responsible business activities in a global environment. The focus of studies is on the globalisation of forest-based industry and business and its structural redevelopment into the bioeconomy. You will become familiar with forest-based issues of the bioeconomy in production, marketing and policy as part of the global operating environment. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor Graduates from the Bachelor’s Programme in Forest Sciences at the University of Helsinki can continue their studies in the Master's Programme in Forest Sciences. There is an application process for graduates from other Bachelor’s programmes, from universities of applied sciences, and for international applicants. In the application process, you are selected for the Master’s Programme in Forest Sciences. Upon admission you must select one of the three study tracks, and you must select your specialisation by the second year of your Master’s studies. Study tracks, specialisations and examples of topics covered by them: Forest eco­logy The management and restoration of forest ecosystems: the sustainable and multitargeted use of forest, the use of peat Forest soil science: the biogeochemistry and hydrology of forest soil, soil and root ecology Forest pathology and mycology: the microbiology and epidemiology of forests Forest zoology: the biology and ecology of forest insects, the ecology of forest pests Wildlife management: game populations and society, the planning of game husbandry, mammal ecology The ecology, management and use of tropical forests: methods of tropical forestry, agroforestry Man­age­ment and use of forest re­sources Forest resource management: the collection and use of forest-related information in decision-making, laser scanning, remote sensing, forest inventory Forest technology and logistics: the management of forest products, terramechanics, forest bioenergy Wood technology: wood science and wood as raw material, laboratories in the forest industry, the structure and properties of wood raw material Forest bioeconomy business and policy Marketing and management in the forest industry: strategic management and marketing, responsibility in forestry, customer orientation, innovations Forest economics: business economics of units within forest bioeconomy, economics of silviculture, forest investment and the economic impact of environmental targets International forest policy: global processes and trends impacting the forest sector from the perspective of individuals, communities and nations Pro­gramme struc­ture The Bachelor’s Programme in Forest Sciences includes two study tracks: forest ecology and the use of forest resources, and forest economics and marketing. The Master's Programme in Forest Sciences comprises three study tracks: forest ecology, the management and use of forest resources, and business economics and policies of forest bioeconomy. These study tracks include a total of 12 specialisations (see specialisations above). Upon completing the Master's Programme in Forest Sciences you will be eligible to apply for the Doctoral Programme in Sustainable Use of Renewable Natural Resources. Thesis Completing your Master's thesis will demonstrate your ability to solve a well-defined research problem of interest to your field of specialisation in accordance with the principles of scientific research. When writing the thesis, you will examine the research problem and background literature, apply different research methods, analyse the results and draw conclusions from them. The objective of the thesis project is for you to demonstrate that you have mastered the key terminology and theories of the field as well as academic writing (in Finnish, Swedish or English). The Master’s thesis is typically completed within a research project of the degree programme in forest sciences or as an assignment commissioned by a research institute or company. Hence, the Master’s thesis project also offers excellent opportunities to establish networks and contacts with potential employers. Ca­reer pro­spects A degree in forestry offers extensive and fairly unique professional competence on a global scale on forest and peatland ecosystems, forest management and use, forest conservation, the business economics and policies of forest bioeconomy as well as the collection, management and use of forest-related information. For more information in Finnish on the available career opportunities, see www.metsatieteet.fi. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion Studies in forestry offer ample opportunities for international activities. For example, you can complete your practical training or collect material for your Master’s thesis abroad. Most courses in the Master’s programme are in English, and several international students participate. You can also serve as a tutor for international exchange students and establish contacts and networks in this way. Another example of international activities is the Helsinki Summer School, which offers intensive courses on topical issues and brings together students from as many as 60 countries. Net­work­ing The forest sector as a whole increasingly networks with other sectors, such as land use and the textile, packaging, information technology, energy, materials, chemistry and services industries. The forest sciences degree programmes engage in teaching and research across faculty boundaries, so you can choose from a wide variety of courses and modules also from outside your own programme. Examples range from environmental sciences and land use to molecular biosciences and business economics. Teachers and researchers in the Master’s Programme in Forest Sciences also have good contacts with businesses, government agencies and research institutes outside the University. These include companies in the forest industry and bioeconomy sector (Stora Enso, Metsä Group, UPM), operators in the forest sector (Metsähallitus, the Finnish Forest Centre), research and development organisations (the Natural Resources Institute Finland (LUKE), the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI) of the National Land Survey of Finland, the Finnish Food Safety Authority, the Finnish Environment Institute, Pellervo Economic Research, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Metsäteho, TTS Work Efficiency Institute and the Tapio Group), consulting companies focused on forests, the bioeconomy and natural resources (e.g., Pöyry Management Consulting, Indufor, Arbonaut), the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment as well as various associations (including the Central Union of Agricultural Producers and Forest Owners and WWF Finland). Internationally, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) offer traineeship placements for our students. Re­search fo­cus University-level teaching is based on the latest research results. The teaching and research topics in forest sciences cover important current themes, such as the sustainable use of forests and other natural resources, climate change, urbanisation, new bioenergy production methods as well as digital services based on forest resource information. As a student of forest sciences, you will have the opportunity to seek solutions to these current challenges through actual research projects. Key research areas in forest sciences include: Interactions between forest and peatland ecosystems and climate change Socio-economic changes and the global forest sector The management of forest information Economic-ecological models of forest use and conservation The Department of Forest Sciences is engaged in two centres of excellence in research funded by the Academy of Finland: Centre of Excellence in Atmospheric Science – From Molecular and Biological processes to the Global Climate (ATM) Centre of Excellence in Laser Scanning Research The Department operates a forestry field station in Hyytiälä, which also accommodates a research station where most of the measurements performed by the Atmospheric Research Center take place (SMEAR II station). The Carbon Tree animation illustrates how the trees at the Hyytiälä SMEAR station assimilate carbon in real time. The Master’s Programme in Forest Sciences is about to launch a new specialisation focusing on international forest policy. For further information about research related to the degree programmes in forest sciences, see: www.helsinki.fi/forestsciences/research/index.html [-]

Master in Geography

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Our students can work as experts in their field, both independently and as members of multi-professional teams. [+]

Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Our students can work as experts in their field, both independently and as members of multi-professional teams. The teaching within the programme is connected with the work of the geography research groups. It is often possible to write the final thesis as part of work in a research group or a research institute in a related field. The Master’s programme in geography is divided into three study tracks (described in section 4). Our students have been very successful in the job market after completing our programme. The strengths of students who have completed our Master’s programme when it comes to research and expertise are: their ability to apply theoretical knowledge a broad understanding of multi-layered regional issues strong interaction skills within multi-disciplinary groups of specialists their ability to communicate in writing, orally, and graphically about geographical phenomena and research findings their ability to utilise and interpret various kinds of research data their versatile knowledge of methodology in geography their ability to apply the newest methods in geoinformatics and cartography their embracing of responsible and ethical scientifc practices The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 13 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The main teaching language within the Master’s programme is English. Assignments, including the Master’s thesis, may also be written in Finnish or Swedish. Pro­gramme con­tents The first year of the advanced module of the Master’s programme contains the method courses of your chosen study track, elective courses, and advanced literature. During this year you will start planning your Master’s thesis. In the autumn of the second year, you will join a Master’s seminar and take exams on literature related to the MSc thesis. In the spring, you should be ready to present your finished MSc thesis (Pro gradu). In addition, you can take optional courses in both years that support your study track. If you are studying to be a teacher, you will take courses in pedagogy during your second year. Studying takes many forms. A large part of the instruction is contact teaching. Method and specialisation courses are usually implemented in groups of 10-20 students, where it is easy to discuss professional issues and gain deeper insights. Independent study is supported through workshops supervised by older students, and reading circles. The Master’s programme also includes extensive exams on literature in the field. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor The Master’s programme in geography is divided into study tracks. The study tracks offer students the opportunity to specialise in different areas of geography. The Master’s programme contains both general and study track-specific courses. The teaching within the Master’s programme in geography is seamlessly connected with the Master’s programme in urban studies and planning, which is jointly implemented with Aalto University. The study tracks in the Master’s programme for geography are: physical geography human geography and spatial planning geoinformatics Physical geography is an area of geography that studies natural systems and the regional interaction between nature and humans. The main parts of physical geography are geomorphology, climatology, hydrogeography, biogeography, and research into global change. The Master’s courses in physical geography work towards deeper regional syntheses, explain the physical surroundings and their changes as a part of the function of regional systems, and analyse and model the relationships between different sectors. Focus areas in the Master’s programme in physical geography are the effect of global change on natural systems, watershed research, and the regional modelling of geomorphological processes and local climates. A considerable part of the Master’s programme in physical geography consists of work in small groups or in the field, where you will learn to implement theories in practice. Having completed the Master’s programme in physical geography, you will be able to analyse and model regional systems of nature, as well as the interaction between nature and humans. In addition, the programme teaches you to analyse sustainable use of natural resources, and evaluate environmental impact. You will learn to implement theoretical knowledge and regional methods in planning a scientific thesis, implementing it in practice, and presenting your results orally and in writing. Further, the courses will train you to take specimens independently, analyse them, and interpret them. The teaching at the Master’s stage is closely connected with research on physical geography: theses are done in collaboration with a research group or research institute. Human geography and spatial planning is a study track, where regional structures and related planning is studied. Urban structures, regional social structures, statewide regional structures, the regional development in the European Union, and globalisation are studied. At the core of the study track is the spatial transformation of society. The Master’s programme studies such phenomena as the divergence of regional and urban structures, urban culture, as well as the political-geographical dynamics of regions. In addition, sustainability, multiculturalism, segregation, housing, and migration are at the core of the study track. Relevant themes for the study track are also regional and urban planning, the political ecology of use of natural resources and land, and gobal development issues. These geographical phenomena and themes are studied through both theoretical and empirical questions, which can be analysed with different qualitative and quantitative methods. The programme goes into how theories on cities and regional systems can be transformed into empirical research questions. After completing their Master’s theses, students can independently gather empirical data on the main dimensions of regional and urban structures and regional development, they can analyse these data with both qualitative and quantitative methods, and they can evaluate the planning practices connected with regional and social structures. After graduating from the Master’s programme, students will be able to communicate about phenomena and research findings in regional and urban structures, both orally and in writing. Geoinformatics is an effective approach to the study and understanding of complex regional issues. Geoinformatics studies and develops computational methods for gaining, processing, analysing, and presenting positioning data. As a part of geography, geoinformatics is a research method on the one hand, to be used in the study of complex regional issues from urban environments to natural ones, from studying local environments to issues of sustainability in developing countries. On the other hand, the methods are the object of research. In urban environments, the methods of geoinformatics can be used to study accessibility and mobility, for example, or to plan a good park network. In the context of developing countries, the research into climate change, land use, or interaction between humans and environment with the help of quantitative, qualitative, and involving methods rises into the front. Students in geography reach a basic understanding of geoinformatics methods in the study of geographical issues, the sources and use of different sets of data (remote sensing, global and national databases, geographical Big Data), analysis methods, and effective visualisation of results. At the Master’s level, as a student specialising in geoinformatics you will advance your skills both theoretically and technically, developing your methodological expertise from data acquisition to data refinement and visualisation with the help of geoinformatics methods. The instruction is directly connected with the work of research groups and theses are often written as a part of research work. After graduating, you will be able to utilise versatile approaches in geoinformatics in research into geographical questions. You will be able to follow the rapid development of the subject independently, and participate on your own. Pro­gramme struc­ture The Master’s programme in geography comprises 120 credits (ECTS) and you should graduate as a Master of Science in two academic years. The following courses are included in the degree: 60 credits of shared advanced courses or according to study track (including MSc thesis 30 credits) 60 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes 60 credits of courses in pedagogy for teaching students The other studies may include working-life or periods of international work or study Working-life orientation and career planning Personal study plan Thesis The MSc thesis (Pro gradu) is a supervised final research project in which you deepen your knowledge in geography and develop your skills as a researcher. The thesis yields 30 credits. The purpose of the thesis work is to develop your abilities in independent information seeking, analysis of existing information, and critical interpretation of it. In your MSc thesis, you demonstrate your in-depth knowledge of a central issue or phenomenon within your subject and your ability to employ scientific research methods. A meritorious MSc thesis will produce new knowledge about geographical phenomena and report the findings clearly and according to good scientific practices. Ca­reer pro­spects The Master’s programme in geography provides you with excellent abilities to work in research or as specialists. Our graduates have found good employment in the public and private sectors, in Finland and abroad. Their postings include: Evaluation of environmental effects and environment consultation Positioning and remote-sensing work Regional and urban planning Governmental community and regional administration Governmental posts in ministries Organisational posts Development cooperation projects Communication and publishing work Teaching Com­pet­ence The qualification for subject teachers is attained through the upper university degree (Master’s programme). However, the subjects that you will want to teach must, for the most part, be included in your lower degree. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion The Master’s programme in geography offers many opportunities for international work: Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university Traineeship abroad Participation in international projects and expeditions (e.g. to the Taita research station in Kenya) Participation in international research groups (writing your thesis) Participation in language courses at the University of Helsinki (a wide range of languages, including rare ones) Re­search fo­cus In physical geography: Research into global change, especially the environmental effects of climate change Watershed research, the physical-chemical quality and ecological status of water systems Natural systems, their function and change Regional analytics and modelling in research into natural systems Positioning and remote-sensing methods and their application when studying the status and changes in natural environments ‘Big data,’ analysis of regional and temporal data The Arctic areas: status, change and vulnerability In human geography and spatial planning: Transformation and segregation in the social and physical urban environment The changing rationalities and concepts of regional and urban planning Regional policy and geopolitics Urbanisation and changing relationships between state and cities Internationalisation of cities and states The spatial planning system of the European Union Regional policy of data-intensive economics the political ecology and management of natural resources and land use globalisation In geoinformatics: Spatial data analysis, new information sources Development of remote-sensing methods for environmental study, especially hyper-spectral remote-sensing data and drone applications Application of geoinformatics methods to environmental and urban research [-]

Master in Geology and Geophysics

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

The Master's Programme in Geology and Geophysics trains you to address pressing questions concerning our home planet's evolution, its role as the source of raw materials needed by modern civilisation, and environmental issues. [+]

Sustaining a growing population on our dynamic planet requires deep understanding of geological and geophysical processes within the Earth, and of how they interact with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biota. The Master's Programme in Geology and Geophysics trains you to address pressing questions concerning our home planet's evolution, its role as the source of raw materials needed by modern civilisation, and environmental issues. Key questions include: How can we decode Earth’s rock record to reveal the evolution of Earth’s crust and mantle over billions of years? How do we make natural resource exploration and extraction more sustainable and environmentally friendly? What can the Earth’s history tell us to help us forecast the impacts of climate change? Where can we safely construct power plants or store nuclear waste? The programme includes four specialist options: Petrology and Economic Geology; Hydrogeology and Environmental Geology; Palaeontology and Global Change; and Solid Earth Geophysics. Upon completion of the programme, you will have gained expertise in a number of scientific and professional skills, including, depending on your specialist option: Assessment of geological materials (minerals, rock types, bedrock, groundwater) Understanding the genesis and sustainable use of mineral commodities Sustainable use of the environment from the Earth Science perspective Palaeontology and modelling global change using the geological record The physical evolution of the Earth (plate tectonics, interplay of the mantle and crust) Independent and team-driven project research High-level scientific writing (M.Sc. thesis and related work) Presentation of scientific results to scientists, students, and the general public The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15,000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion All teaching is given in English, expect on the specialist option Hydrogeology and Environmental geology, where some of the courses are only in Finnish. You can also take exams in Finnish or Swedish, and you can write your Master’s thesis in Finnish or Swedish. Pro­gramme con­tents At the beginning of the advanced studies, you will familiarise yourself with the central research methods in the field. The studies consist of intensive learning in small groups on practical work courses, guided laboratory work on specialised courses, and tailored short-term courses led by international and Finnish experts. In addition, you will be able to take part are a variety of field courses and excursions (in Finland and beyond) to familiarise yourself with research topics in their natural surroundings. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor As a student in the Master’s Programme in Geology and Geophysics, you are free to choose among the four specialist options offered: In Petrology and Economic Geology you will study solid rock, mineral material and associated fluid systems, with targets ranging from the microscopic (and submicroscopic) scale to continents. The focus is on study of magmatic systems (volcanic and plutonic); the composition, lithology and structure of bedrock; evolution of continental crust and mantle; and the origin and assessment of economically important commodities in rock systems. Hydrogeology and Environmental Geology combines understanding of earth surface systems such as 3D sedimentary environments, groundwater and low temperature geochemistry. The specialist option is based on practical training using top-notch analytical facilities and survey methods in cooperation with industry and authorities. In addition to basic research, the line aims to build your expertise for future careers. Palaeontology and Global Change deals with the changing conditions and evolution of life on Earth. Research topics include fossil mammals and their environments during the last 25 million years, the environmental and evolutionary context of early humans in Africa, and the history of climate change and ecosystems during the last 100,000 years. The effect of humankind on the biosphere is a multidisciplinary topic. Solid Earth Geophysics combines geology with geophysics to study the structure of the Earth’s interior and the physical processes related to its evolution. These ideas are not only crucial for understanding phenomena such as earthquake and volcanic activity related to Plate Tectonics, but also important for exploration of natural resources, environmental studies and engineering, for example. Pro­gramme struc­ture A Master’s degree in Geology and Geophysics requires 120 credits (ECTS) and is designed to be completed in two years of full-time study. The study requirements are: Advanced studies in your specialist option (60-70 credits) Joint studies in topics related to your specialist option (25-30 credits) Master’s thesis (30 credits) Thesis As a student in the Master’s programme you will be expected to write a thesis. The goal of the Master’s thesis is to enable you to study an area of interest to you within your specialist option, and to help you develop research skills such as scientific writing, literature review, and advanced knowledge in your area of study. The thesis typically includes a review of current literature and experiments or analysis of geological or geophysical data. You will write your thesis independently, under the supervision of one or more faculty members in your specialist option. Ca­reer pro­spects Expert geoscientists are in demand and employed in a range of fields nationally and internationally. Recent graduates have gone on to pursue: Employment in the mining and mineral resource exploration industry Work as environmental and groundwater scientists in private companies and in the public sector Doctoral studies in geoscience or geophysics both in Finland and abroad Research work on the geology of Finland at the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) Work as experts in the field of engineering geology and applied mineralogy In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion About 20% of the professors in the programme are from outside of Finland, and the number of international students and other researchers in the department has been increasing steadily over the past decade. Net­work­ing The Department of Geosciences and Geography collaborates with private, governmental and university researchers in Finland and abroad. Major players include the GTK and SYKE. In addition, the specialist option in Solid Earth Geophysics is organised in collaboration with the Department of Physics at the University of Helsinki. Re­search fo­cus There are many ongoing interdisciplinary research projects in the Faculty of Science. These projects are conducted in active cooperation with research institutes on the Kumpula Science Campus, as well as with other faculties, universities, and private industry. The field of Geosciences is broad, and our research focus covers multiple branches of it. Some of the main interests at the moment include environmental topics related to groundwater and contaminated soils, the genesis of plutonic and volcanic igneous rocks, evolutionary palaeontology of mammals based on fossil teeth, and the structure and evolution of the continental crust. We are focusing on scientific research that makes it possible to understand geological processes and the structure of the Earth using our modern and diverse laboratory infrastructure. [-]

Master in Life Science Informatics

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Life Sciences is one of the strategic research fields at the University of Helsinki. The multidisciplinary Master’s Programme in Life Science Informatics (LSI) integrates research excellence and research infrastructures in the Helsinki Institute of Life Sciences (HiLIFE). The unique combination of study opportunities tailored from the offering of the three campuses provides an attractive educational profile. [+]

Life Sciences is one of the strategic research fields at the University of Helsinki. The multidisciplinary Master’s Programme in Life Science Informatics (LSI) integrates research excellence and research infrastructures in the Helsinki Institute of Life Sciences (HiLIFE). As a student, you will gain access to active research communities on three campuses: Kumpula, Viikki, and Meilahti. The unique combination of study opportunities tailored from the offering of the three campuses provides an attractive educational profile. The LSI programme is designed for students with a background in mathematics, computer science and statistics, as well as for students with these disciplines as a minor in their bachelor’s degree, with their major being, for example, ecology, evolutionary biology or genetics. As a graduate of the LSI programme you will: Have first class knowledge and capabilities for a career in life science research and in expert duties in the public and private sectors Competence to work as a member of a group of experts Have understanding of the regulatory and ethical aspects of scientific research Have excellent communication and interpersonal skills for employment in an international and interdisciplinary professional setting Understand the general principles of mathematical modelling, computational, probabilistic and statistical analysis of biological data, and be an expert in one specific specialisation area of the LSI programme Understand the logical reasoning behind experimental sciences and be able to critically assess research-based information Have mastered scientific research, making systematic use of investigation or experimentation to discover new knowledge Have the ability to report results in a clear and understandable manner for different target groups Have good opportunities to continue your studies for a doctoral degree The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion All teaching is in English. Pro­gramme con­tents The Life Science Informatics Master’s Programme has six specialisation areas, each anchored in its own research group or groups. Algorithmic bioinformatics with the Genome-scale algorithmics, Combinatorial Pattern Matching, and Practical Algorithms and Data Structures on Strings research groups. This specialisation area educates you to be an algorithm expert who can turn biological questions into appropriate challenges for computational data analysis. In addition to the tailored algorithm studies for analysing molecular biology measurement data, the curriculum includes general algorithm and machine learning studies offered by the Master's Programmes in Computer Science and Data Science. Applied bioinformatics, jointly with The Institute of Biotechnology and genetics.Bioinformatics has become an integral part of biological research, where innovative computational approaches are often required to achieve high-impact findings in an increasingly data-dense environment. Studies in applied bioinformatics prepare you for a post as a bioinformatics expert in a genomics research lab, working with processing, analysing and interpreting Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) data, and working with integrated analysis of genomic and other biological data, and population genetics. Biomathematics with the Biomathematics research group, focusing on mathematical modelling and analysis of biological phenomena and processes. The research covers a wide spectrum of topics ranging from problems at the molecular level to the structure of populations. To tackle these problems, the research group uses a variety of modelling approaches, most importantly ordinary and partial differential equations, integral equations and stochastic processes. A successful analysis of the models requires the study of pure research in, for instance, the theory of infinite dimensional dynamical systems; such research is also carried out by the group. Biostatistics and bioinformatics is offered jointly by the statistics curriculum, the Master´s Programme in Mathematics and Statistics and the research groups Statistical and Translational Genetics, Computational Genomics and Computational Systems Medicine in FIMM. Topics and themes include statistical, especially Bayesian methodologies for the life sciences, with research focusing on modelling and analysis of biological phenomena and processes. The research covers a wide spectrum of collaborative topics in various biomedical disciplines. In particular, research and teaching address questions of population genetics, phylogenetic inference, genome-wide association studies and epidemiology of complex diseases. Eco-evolutionary Informatics with ecology and evolutionary biology, in which several researchers and teachers have a background in mathematics, statistics and computer science. Ecology studies the distribution and abundance of species, and their interactions with other species and the environment. Evolutionary biology studies processes supporting biodiversity on different levels from genes to populations and ecosystems. These sciences have a key role in responding to global environmental challenges. Mathematical and statistical modelling, computer science and bioinformatics have an important role in research and teaching. Systems biology and medicine with the Genome-scale Biology Research Program in Biomedicum. The focus is to understand and find effective means to overcome drug resistance in cancers. The approach is to use systems biology, i.e., integration of large and complex molecular and clinical data (big data) from cancer patients with computational methods and wet lab experiments, to identify efficient patient-specific therapeutic targets. Particular interest is focused on developing and applying machine learning based methods that enable integration of various types of molecular data (DNA, RNA, proteomics, etc.) to clinical information. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor During the first Autumn semester, each specialisation area gives you an introductory course. At the beginning of the Spring semester you are assumed to have decided your study direction. Pro­gramme struc­ture Studies amount to 120 credits (ECTS), which can be completed in two years according to a personal study plan. 60 credits of advanced studies from the specialisation area, including a Master’s thesis, 30 credits 60 credits of other studies chosen from the programme or from other programmes (e.g. computer science, mathematics and statistics, genetics, ecology and evolutionary biology) For more information about the degree requirements and teaching curricula, please see (linkki LSI:n omalle sivulle jonka osoitte lisätään). Thesis The programme includes a mandatory Master´s thesis, a scientific research project. The project can be theoretical or practical in nature, including biological or medical data-analysis from an ongoing research project. The resulting thesis is a written work that demonstrates your ability for scientific reasoning and your familiarity with the relevant scientific literature. You will be appointed a supervisor who will hold regular meetings with you to ensure that your thesis work is proceeding smoothly and on schedule. The thesis is worth 30 credits (ECTS), corresponding to full-time studies during one semester. Although the thesis is an independent work, it is often done as part of a research group. Ca­reer pro­spects The Master of Life Science Informatics degree provides excellent opportunities to apply and perform postgraduate studies either at the University of Helsinki, at other universities in Finland, or abroad. As a graduate, you might also find employment, for example, in health sector enterprises, such as bioindustry. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion The Life Science Informatics MSc is an international programme, with international students and an international research environment. The researchers and professors in the programme are internationally recognized for their research. A significant fraction of the teaching and research staff is international. As a student you can participate in an international student exchange programme, which offers the possibility to include international experience as part of your degree. Life Science Informatics itself is an international field and graduates can find employment in any country. In the programme, all courses are given in English. Although the Helsinki region is very international and English is widely spoken, you can also take courses to learn Finnish via the University of Helsinki’s Language Centre’s Finnish courses. The Language Centre also offers an extensive programme of foreign language courses for those interested in learning new languages. Net­work­ing The Life Science Informatics MSc programme collaborates with HiLIFE, Institute of Biotechnology, FIMM, Biomedicum, HIIT, and other Master’s programmes: Data Science Mathematics and Statistics Computer Science Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Translational Medicine Genetics and Molecular Biosciences The flexible study rights programme (JOO) allows you to study at other Finnish universities as part of your degree. Re­search fo­cus The research groups offering the Life Science Informatics MSc programme specialisation areas are included in three Centres of Excellence of the Academy of Finland: The Centre of Excellence in Analysis and Dynamics Research Metapopulation Research Centre The Finnish Centre of Excellence in Cancer Genetics Research The Academy of Finland's Centres of Excellence are the flagships of Finnish research. They are at the cutting edge of science in their fields, carving out new avenues for research, developing creative research environments and training talented new researchers for Finnish research and Finnish business and industry. A CoE is a research and training network that has clearly defined research objectives and is run under a joint management. Funding is provided for a six-year term, which means that a CoE can work toward long-term objectives and even take risks. CoEs are jointly funded by the Academy of Finland, universities, research institutes, the private business sector and many other sources. [-]

Master in Materials Research

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

This programme combines expertise from the areas of chemistry, physics and materials research at the University of Helsinki, which are ranked high in international evaluations. In the programme, you will focus on the fundamental physical and chemical problems in synthesising and characterising materials, developing new materials and improving existing ones. Your studies will concentrate on materials science rather than materials engineering. [+]

Materials are substances or things from which something is or can be made. Technological development is often based on the development of new materials. Materials research plays an important part in solving challenging problems relating to energy, food, water, health and well-being, the environment, sustainable use of resources, and urbanisation. An expert in materials research studies the chemical and physical bases of existing and new materials; their synthesis and processing, composition and structure, properties and performance. As an expert in materials research, your skills will be needed in research institutions, the technology industry (electronics and electrotechnical industry, information technology, mechanical engineering, metal industry, consulting), chemical industry, forest industry, energy industry, medical technology and pharmaceuticals. This programme combines expertise from the areas of chemistry, physics and materials research at the University of Helsinki, which are ranked high in international evaluations. In the programme, you will focus on the fundamental physical and chemical problems in synthesising and characterising materials, developing new materials and improving existing ones. Your studies will concentrate on materials science rather than materials engineering. Upon graduating from the programme you will have a solid understanding of the essential concepts, theories, and experimental methods of materials research. You will learn the different types of materials and will be able to apply and adapt theories and experimental methods to new problems in the field and assess critically other scientists’ work. You will also be able to communicate information in your field to both colleagues and laymen. Depending on the study line you choose you will gain in-depth understanding of The synthesis, processing, structure and properties of inorganic materials Modelling methods in materials research The structure and dynamics of biomolecular systems The synthesis, structure and properties of polymers Applications of materials research in industrial applications The use of methods of physics in medicine The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion All teaching is in English. You can also take exams in Finnish or Swedish, and you can write your Master’s thesis in Finnish or Swedish, as well as in English. The only exceptions are certain courses related to medical physics education and part of the education for radiation protection experts (RPE) and radiation protection officers (RPO). In these cases, the teaching is in Finnish. Pro­gramme con­tents In the programme, all teaching is based on the teachers’ solid expertise in the fundamental chemistry and physics of materials. All teachers also use their own current research in the field in their teaching. Your studies will include a variety of teaching methods such as lectures, exercises, laboratory work, projects and summer schools. In addition to your specialisation, you can include studies in minor subjects from other programmes in chemistry, physics and computer science. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor At the beginning of your studies you will make a personal study plan, with the help of teaching staff, where you choose your study line. This programme has the following six study lines representing different branches of materials research. Ex­per­i­mental ma­ter­i­als phys­ics Here you will study the properties and processing of a wide variety of materials using experimental methods of physics to characterise and process them. In this programme the materials range from the thin films used in electronics components, future fusion reactor materials, and energy materials to biological and medical materials. The methods are based on different radiation species, mostly X-rays and ion beams. Com­pu­ta­tional ma­ter­i­als phys­ics In this study line you will use computer simulations to model the structures, properties and processes of materials, both inorganic materials such as metals and semiconductors, and biological materials such as cell membranes and proteins. You will also study various nanostructures. The methods are mostly atomistic ones where information is obtained with atomic level precision. Supercomputers are often needed for the calculations. Modelling research is closely connected with the experimental work related to the other study lines. Med­ical phys­ics Medical physics is a branch of applied physics encompassing the concepts, principles and methodology of the physical sciences to medicine in clinics. Primarily, medical physics seeks to develop safe and efficient diagnosis and treatment methods for human diseases with the highest quality assurance protocols. In Finland most medical physicists are licensed hospital physicists (PhD or Phil.Lic). Poly­mer ma­ter­i­als chem­istry In this line you will study polymer synthesis and characterisation methods. One of the central questions in polymer chemistry is how the properties of large molecules depend on the chemical structure and on the size and shape of the polymer. The number of applications of synthetic polymers is constantly increasing, due to the development of polymerisation processes as well as to better comprehension of the physical properties of polymers. In­or­ganic ma­ter­i­als chem­istry Thin films form the most important research topic in inorganic materials chemistry. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is the most widely studied deposition method. The ALD research covers virtually all areas related to ALD: precursor synthesis and characterisation, film growth and characterisation, reaction mechanism studies, and the first steps of taking the processes toward applications. The emphasis has been on thin film materials needed in future generation integrated circuits, but applications of ALD in energy technologies, optics, surface engineering and biomaterials are also being studied. Other thin film deposition techniques studied include electrodeposition, SILAR (successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction) and sol-gel. Nanostructured materials are prepared either directly (fibres by electrospinning and porous materials by anodisation) or by combining these or other templates with thin film deposition techniques. Elec­tron­ics and in­dus­trial ap­plic­a­tions Sound and light are used both to sense and to actuate across a broad spectrum of disciplines employing samples ranging from red hot steel to smooth muscle fibres. Particular interest is in exploiting the link between the structure and mechanics of the samples. The main emphasis is on developing quantitative methods suitable for the needs of industry. To support these goals, research concentrates on several applied physics disciplines, the main areas being ultrasonics, photoacoustics, fibre optics and confocal microscopy. Pro­gramme struc­ture The programme consists of 120 credits (ECTS) and can be completed in two academic years. The studies cover: Personal study plan Common courses for all students in the programme (10-20 credits) Advanced studies in your chosen study line and studies from other lines or programmes (70-80 credits) Master’s thesis (30 credits) Thesis Studies in the programme include a Master’s thesis worth 30 credits. In your thesis you will focus on a particular problem in materials research, applying the knowledge and skills you have acquired during your studies to solve the problem. Your thesis is a written work that demonstrates your ability to think scientifically, your command of research methods, your familiarity with your area of research, and your aptitude for written scientific communication. Your thesis should contain a definition of the research questions, a review of the relevant literature, and a theoretical, computational and/or experimental section pursuing your solution to the research questions. You will have a supervisor who will have regular meetings with you to ensure that your thesis work is progressing smoothly and on schedule. You will be expected to complete your thesis in one semester. Although the thesis is an independent project, you will often work as a part of a research group in the field. You can also write the thesis while working in a company on a topic defined by the company, assuming the topic matches the requirements. This is an issue you will need to discuss with your supervisor. Ca­reer pro­spects With an MSc or PhD in materials research, you will be in a good position to find rewarding jobs in research institutions and industry. As a graduate in materials research you will have many potential career paths inside and outside universities. Many MSc graduates have continued their studies in doctoral programmes in Finland and abroad. Employers of our graduates include the technology industry (electronics and electrotechnical industry, information technology, mechanical engineering, metal industry, consulting), chemical industry, forest industry, energy industry, medical technology and pharmaceuticals. Com­pet­ence Within the programme it is possible to obtain qualification as a radiation protection expert (RPE) and radiation protection officer (RPO). RPE and RPO are the official EU-wide names for personnel responsible for radiation protection in working environments. The education and examination are regulated by radiation authorities such as STUK. Note that teaching for RPE and RPO is given in Finnish. The requirements for RPE and RPO will be defined before the end of 2017. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion The programme is international: students from outside Finland are free to apply. Within the programme you have the possibility to spend time as an international exchange student within the university’s exchange programmes, such as Erasmus within the EU. Materials research at the University of Helsinki is very international and many research programmes involve use of international research laboratories such as CERN (particle accelerator in Switzerland/France), ITER (fusion reactor in France), ESRF (European synchrotron light source in France), MAX-IV Laboratory (synchrotron light source in Sweden), and EuXFEL (European x-ray free electron laser in Germany). If you become involved in research programmes that use those facilities, you will have opportunities to participate in internship programmes at them. Net­work­ing The programme combines the expertise of the departments of Chemistry and Physics. Some of the teachers of the programme are doing materials research at the Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP). During your MSc studies you will have the opportunity to take courses at other universities in Finland if they fit into your study plan, within the JOO (Joustava opinto-oikeus or Flexible Study Right) agreement. In the medical physics study line you can perform some laboratory exercises in a hospital environment. Re­search fo­cus Studies in the programme are integrated with research performed by the teachers. A broad spectrum of characterisation, modification and growth methods is used for a large variety of materials. Examples of lines of materials research within the programme are: Biological materials Computer simulation of materials Fusion reactor materials Materials from synthetic polymers and natural polymers Radiation effects on materials, including radiation protection aspects Thin film materials [-]

Master in Mathematics and Statistics

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

When you study mathematics and statistics at the University of Helsinki, some of the best mathematicians and statisticians in the world will be your instructors. Studies in this Master’s programme will give you a solid basis for maths and statistics applications. Graduates of this Master’s programme find employment as researchers, teachers, and in demanding expert posts in the public and private sectors in Finland and abroad. [+]

When you study mathematics and statistics at the University of Helsinki, some of the best mathematicians and statisticians in the world will be your instructors. Studies in this Master’s programme will give you a solid basis for maths and statistics applications. Graduates of this Master’s programme find employment as researchers, teachers, and in demanding expert posts in the public and private sectors in Finland and abroad. The Master’s programme in mathematics and statistics is based on top research. The teaching within the stydy track at the University of Helsinki follows a high standard and is highly valued, not just within Finnish academia but in global university rankings. Upon graduating from this Master’s programme, you will: Be an expert in the methods of mathematics or statistics Have mastered the basics of another scientific discipline Be able to apply scientific knowledge and methods Be able to follow developments in mathematics and statistics Know how to think critically, argue a point, and solve problems Have excellent interaction skills and be assertive and creative Understand the principles of ethical and sustainable development Be well prepared to work as an expert and developer in your field Be prepared for scientific postgraduate studies The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion All teaching is given in English. Exams can also be taken in Finnish or Swedish, and the Master’s thesis can be written in Finnish or Swedish. Pro­gramme con­tents The Master’s programme consists of courses in mathematics, applied mathematics, and statistics. The courses include group and lecture instruction, exercises, literature, and workshops. Most courses also include exams or project assignments. In addition, you can complete some courses independently, by taking literature-based exams. The instructors in this programme have received prizes for their high standard of teaching. The teaching methods used in the subjects in this Master's programme have been widely recognised in the media. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor The specialisation subjects within the programme are: Analysis Mathematical physics and stocastics Applied analysis Computational science Mathematical logic Mathematical modelling Insurance and financial mathematics Algebra and topology Statistics European Master in Official Statistics, EMOS (based on the statistics education in the Faculty of Social Sciences). You will select your specialisation subject during your first year. Pro­gramme struc­ture The Master’s programme comprises 120 credits, which you can complete in two years. The degree in mathematics includes: 85 credits of advanced courses, including the Master’s thesis (Pro gradu, 30 credits) 35 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes Working-life orientation and career planning Personal study plan The degree in statistics includes: 25 credits of advanced mathematics courses 60 credits of advanced statistics courses, including the Master’s thesis (Pro gradu, 30 credits) 35 credits of other courses e.g. more advanced courses in statistics, or e.g. intermediate courses in some other subject, in which you included basic courses in your BSc degree, or module/s from other university programmes Working-life orientation and career planning Personal study plan The European Master in Official Statistics study track includes: 85 credits of advanced courses in statistics or mathematics, including the Master’s thesis (Pro gradu, 30 credits) and a traineeship 35 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes Working-life orientation and career planning Personal study plan Thesis The Master’s thesis (30 credits) is based on a topic selected from your own subject. The purpose of the thesis is to advance your knowledge of your chosen topic. Further, it develops your aptitude for working independently and requires you to understand the scientific literature in your field. The topics will often be related to on-going research projects. If you are interested in research, your thesis work can often be the first stage towards your doctoral dissertation. In mathematics, the MSc thesis is usually written under the supervision of a professor or instructor of the department, but sometimes it can be written outside the department. In statistics, the MSc thesis is usually written outside the department, for example in a government research institute or within research groups on the university campuses. You can acquaint yourself with the range of thesis topics through the thesis database. The supervision of a thesis written outside the department is usually done in cooperation between experts in the research group and a professor or teacher from the department. Ca­reer pro­spects Graduates of the Master’s programme can find employment outside the university or continue with one of the doctoral programmes in mathematics and statistics. The Master’s programme will give you excellent capabilities for work in the public or private sector as an expert in mathematics and statistics, skills that are very sought after in the job market both in Finland and abroad. The banking, investment, and insurance fields, for instance, value mathematicians and statisticians very highly internationally. Many of our graduates work in research and development or as teachers in various educational institutions. Graduates from this programme have excellent chances to find employment corresponding to their education. Com­pet­ence The programme does not give formal qualifications. In actuarial mathematics you can take additional courses elsewhere to gain an SHV degree (an actuary degree approved by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health). By combining the Master’s programme with courses in pedagogy, you can gain competence to work as a teacher. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion The international nature of the programme is implemented in many ways: Research within the disciplines of the degree programme is of high international standard and is highly regarded Teaching staff and research collaboration within the programme are international The atmosphere of the programme is international, several international students are admitted each year Theses and projects may be completed within international projects There are opportunities for a student exchange period in many foreign universities Net­work­ing The programme works in close collaboration with other programmes at the University of Helsinki relating to mathematics and statistics, such as: The Bachelors programme in mathematical sciences The Life Science Informatics Master’s programme The Master’s programme in theoretical and computational methods The Master’s programme in economics The Bachelor’s and Master’s programmes for teachers in mathematics, physics and chemistry Tor the EMOS programme, collaboration with the Faculty of Social Sciences and Statistics Finland Within the JOO programme, it is possible to take courses at e.g. Aalto University and Hanken School of Economics, as well as other Finnish universities. There is also collaboration with many corporate partners for various projects. Re­search fo­cus The research focus within the disciplines in the degree programme are e.g. Geometric analysis and measurement theory Analysis in metric spaces Partial differential equations Functional analysis Harmonic analysis Mathematical physics Stochastics Inversion problems Mathematical logic and set theory Biomathematics Time series analysis Biometry Econometry Psychometrics Social statistics The programme is part of the Analyysin ja dynamiikan (Analysis and dynamics) and the Inversio-ongelmien (Inversion problems) centres of excellence. [-]

Master in Microbiology and Microbial Biotechnology

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Why are microbes the most important group of organisms on our planet? How is knowledge of microbiology applied in medicine and industry, or in food production? What research techniques are used to study viruses, bacteria and other microbes? These are important questions, and you can find answers to these and many others in the study of Microbiology and microbial biotechnology. [+]

Why are microbes the most important group of organisms on our planet? How is knowledge of microbiology applied in medicine and industry, or in food production? What research techniques are used to study viruses, bacteria and other microbes? These are important questions, and you can find answers to these and many others in the study of Microbiology and microbial biotechnology. Upon completing your degree, you will: Understand the global significance of microbes as remodelers and processors of life and the environment Understand the potential for the use of microbes in the development of new applications, such as foodstuffs, drugs, and industrial processes Understand the molecular mechanisms that underpin microbial function Be able to evaluate the effects of changes in the environment on microbial communities and thus on the function of the biosphere Be able to estimate the risks of microbes, and assess the use of microbes in a variety of environments and situations Be able to evaluate ethical questions and the prerequisites of commercialisation related to the use of microbes and biotechnology You will understand the most important functional mechanisms of the major groups of microbes Be aware of the most important pathogens and virulence mechanisms Have mastered the most important microbiological and biotechnological research methods, and become proficient in the interpretation and evaluation of research results Be able to develop and evaluate new microbiological and biotechnological applications Have the capability to plan and lead activities that involve microbiology and biotechnology, and will be able to propose appropriate actions in various situations Know how to search for, produce and critically evaluate scientifically relevant information Have developed the capacity for disseminating relevant information about your topic to various target groups in an appropriate manner within an international environment. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 18 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The language of instruction is mainly English. You can write exams and your thesis in Finnish, Swedish or English. Pro­gramme con­tents The key contents of the study programme in Microbiology and microbial biotechnology are: Research methods in microbiology, biotechnology and bioinformatics Application of microbiological knowledge Solving microbiological problems Critical, research-based scientific thinking Planning, implementation and reporting of microbiological and biotechnological research Functional principles of microbial cells and communities Development from research to product Leadership, entrepreneurship and patenting Other studies, through which you can adapt the degree towards your own interests Discovery of novel findings in the field of biology. Choice of mas­ter’s pro­gramme Students graduating from the University of Helsinki bachelor’s programmes in Molecular biosciences, Food sciences, Environmental sciences and Biology can enter the master’s program in Microbiology or microbial biotechnology. Although each of the bachelor’s programmes provides a different base of knowledge, they all provide a sufficient preparation for the master’s programme in Microbiology and microbial biotechnology. Selection of students, if necessary, will be carried out according to study performance. If you have obtained a bachelor’s degree at another university, or a suitable polytechnic degree at a university of applied sciences, you can apply to enter the master’s programme via a separate application process. When you apply for the programme under these conditions, you will be evaluated on the basis of your previously completed studies, language skills and motivation. You can modify the master’s degree programme for your own interests with elective subjects. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor Students graduating from the University of Helsinki bachelor’s programmes in Molecular biosciences, Food sciences, Environmental sciences and Biology can enter the master’s program in Microbiology and microbial biotechnology. Although each of the bachelor’s programmes provides a different base of knowledge, they all provide a sufficient preparation for the master’s programme in Microbiology and microbial biotechnology. Selection of students, if necessary, will be carried out according to study performance. If you have obtained a bachelor’s degree at another university, or a suitable polytechnic degree at a university of applied sciences, you can apply to enter the master’s programme via a separate application process. When you apply for the programme under these conditions, you will be evaluated on the basis of your previously completed studies, language skills and motivation. You can modify the master’s degree programme for your own interests with elective subjects. Pro­gramme struc­ture There is intensive interaction between teachers and students in the master’s programme in Microbiology and microbial biotechnology. A variety of learning methods are used in the courses, including: Laboratory work, seminars, lectures Oral presentations Written reports (individual, paired, group) Independent reading Work practice, instruction in research groups, project courses Oral group exams, written exams, home essays. At least half of the study credits (60 of 120 credits) will be from courses in Microbiology and microbial biotechnology. By selecting elective and other study opportunities, you will be able to shape the study programme towards many subject areas, such as the environment, food, viruses, fungi, health and microbial diseases, or microbial biotechnology. Thesis Your Master’s thesis accounts for 30 credits. The thesis is generally based on an experimental research project, which you can perform under the supervision of an experienced researcher. During the thesis process, you train yourself in scientific thinking, identifying problems, constructing hypotheses, collecting material, working in the laboratory, analysing results and presenting the results logically, as well as putting your results into the context of current scientific views. You will write your thesis in the format of a scientific publication in which you critically discuss your results from the perspective of the relevant scientific field. Ca­reer pro­spects As a master of science graduating from the master’s programme in Microbiology and microbial biotechnology you will be well prepared to (a) continue your studies toward a doctoral degree, (b) specialise as a hospital microbiologist, or (c) proceed directly to a career in working life. Statistically, the situation for microbiologists proceeding to employment has been very favourable. As a microbiology graduate, you can work in the following sectors: Research and development (universities, research institutes, companies) Surveillance/monitoring in healthcare, food and environment (food industry, drug and diagnostics industry, regulatory authority) Administration, professional roles and consultancy (companies, ministries, supervision offices, EU) Business and management (companies, ministries, supervisory offices, EU) Teaching and education (universities, universities of applied sciences, vocational schools, high schools, comprehensive schools, organisations). In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion As a microbiology student you will have good opportunities to participate in international student exchanges. You can complete some parts of the degree at universities abroad. In addition, there are many international students and researchers on the Viikki campus, bringing a global multicultural atmosphere to your everyday life. Net­work­ing The Viikki bioscience campus offers many opportunities to enrich your studies. The teaching and research cover all areas of microbiology, from the molecular level to environmental ecology and global processes. You can also widen and deepen your knowledge at the University of Helsinki in many other subjects, for example in bioinformatics, chemistry, law, and economics. The master’s programme in Microbiology and microbial biotechnology operates in close collaboration with research institutes and industry: you can apply for an opportunity to perform the laboratory work included in your studies or undertake research for your thesis at another institution. The student organisations Helix, Symbioosi and Lipidi—as well as the Mikrobiologikilta society for students and graduate microbiologists—organise many activities, including excursions, seminars, and meetings. Re­search fo­cus The multidisciplinary research in microbiology and biotechnology taking place within the Viikki campus is recognised both nationally and internationally. For more information regarding research in microbiological sciences and biotechnology at Viikki, please see the following: Bacterial virulence mechanisms and interaction in the host organism Food production chains Food quality and healthy nutrition Macromolecular structure and assembly Microbial ecology and evolution Microbes in polluted environments and peatland ecosystems Molecular virology Plant viruses Utilization of microbial resources Vital soil and clean environment [-]

Master in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

What are the laws of nature governing the universe from elementary particles to the formation and evolution of the solar system, stars, and galaxies? In the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, you will focus on gaining a quantitative understanding of these phenomena. [+]

What are the laws of nature governing the universe from elementary particles to the formation and evolution of the solar system, stars, and galaxies? In the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, you will focus on gaining a quantitative understanding of these phenomena. With the expertise in basic research that you will gain in the programme, you can pursue a career in research. You will also acquire proficiency in the use of mathematical methods, IT tools and/or experimental equipment, as well as strong problem-solving and logical deduction skills. These will qualify you for a wide range of positions in the private sector. After completing the programme, you will: Have wide-ranging knowledge of particle physics and/or astrophysical phenomena. Have good analytical, deductive and computational skills. Be able to apply theoretical, computational and/or experimental methods to the analysis and understanding of various phenomena. Be able to generalize your knowledge of particle physics and astrophysical phenomena as well as identify their interconnections. Be able to formulate hypotheses and test them based your knowledge. The teaching in particle physics and astrophysical sciences is largely based on the basic research. Basic research conducted at the University of Helsinki has received top ratings in international university rankings. The in-depth learning offered by international research groups will form a solid foundation for your lifelong learning. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The Master’s programme is multilingual. The primary language of instruction is English. You can also complete courses and your thesis in Finnish or Swedish, unless the nature of the teaching requires otherwise. In this programme, you will be part of an international student and research community. Pro­gramme con­tents The understanding of the microscopic structure of matter, astronomical phenomena and the dynamics of the universe is at the forefront of basic research today. The advancement of such research in the future will require increasingly sophisticated theoretical, computational and experimental methods. The study track in elementary particle physics and cosmology focuses on experimental or theoretical particle physics or cosmology. The theories that form our current understanding of these issues must be continuously re-evaluated in the light of new experimental results. In addition to analytical computation skills, this requires thorough mastery of numerical analysis methods. In experimental particle physics, the main challenges pertain to the management and processing of continuously increasing amount of data. The study track in astrophysical sciences focuses on observational or theoretical astronomy or space physics. Our understanding of space, ranging from near Earth space all the way to structure of the universe, is being continuously redefined because of improved experimental equipment located both in space and on the Earth’s surface. Several probes are also carrying out direct measurements of planets, moons and interplanetary plasma in our solar system. Another key discipline is theoretical astrophysics which, with the help of increasingly efficient supercomputers, enables us to create in-depth models of various phenomena in the universe in general and the field of space physics in particular. Finally, plasma physics is an important tool in both space physics and astronomy research. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor The Master’s programme includes two study tracks: Particle physics and cosmology Astrophysical sciences Courses in the programme have been compiled into modules. Both study tracks contain a mandatory core module that includes a research seminar. The study tracks are divided into specialisations that focus on astronomy, space physics, particle physics or cosmology. Courses typically include lectures, exercises, group work and research literature and end in examinations and/or final assignments. In addition, some studies can be completed as book examinations. Pro­gramme struc­ture The scope of the Master’s programme is 120 credits (ECTS), which can be completed in two years. The degree consists of 90 credits of Master’s studies, including a Master’s thesis (30 credits) 30 credits of other studies from the Master’s programme or other degree programmes In addition, your studies include a personal study plan as well as career orientation and planning. You might also take part in a traineeship, elective studies offered by the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, or studies offered by other degree programmes. Thesis The Master’s degree programme culminates in a Master’s thesis, which demonstrates your familiarity with scientific thought as well as your command of the necessary research methods, knowledge of your thesis topic and ability to communicate scientifically in writing in accordance with the practices of the scientific community. The scope of the Master’s thesis is 30 credits. In your thesis you will define and formulate relevant scientific questions, place the research problem in the appropriate context by reviewing the relevant research literature, and answer the research questions using theoretical, numerical, observational and/or experimental methods. You can also complete your thesis as part of a larger research project, provided that your independent input can be clearly verified and assessed. However, you must complete the written component of your thesis independently. Your thesis project will be supervised by your appointed supervisor, who will meet with you regularly to ensure that your work is progressing on schedule. The target duration of the Master’s thesis project is one term. Many students complete their theses as part of a research group, which enables you to participate in top-level research during your Master’s studies. Ca­reer pro­spects A Master’s degree in elementary particle physics or astrophysical sciences provides you with excellent qualifications for postgraduate education in research or for a career in diverse positions both in Finland and abroad. As a Master’s graduate you could begin a career in research and development in industry as well as in universities and other research institutes that enable you to conduct independent research on a topic that interests you. Potential employers and career opportunities include Research institutes in Finland and abroad (basic scientific research) Universities and universities of applied sciences (teaching) Industry, particularly high technology companies (applied research and development, managerial duties) Software production, e.g., the game sector Diverse planning and consulting positions Master’s graduates from equivalent study tracks under the previous degree system have embarked on careers in Research and teaching positions in Finnish universities and research institutes Research and teaching positions abroad, for example at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research), ESA (the European Space Agency), ESO (the European Southern Observatory), and NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Administrative positions, for example at the Academy of Finland or the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation (Tekes) The business sector The strong theoretical and analytical skills you will acquire in the programme are in great demand in fields such as: Data analysis (industry, media companies, game companies, financing) Industrial research, development and consulting (at, e.g., Nokia, Ericsson, Apple, Sanoma, Spinverse, Supercell, Nielsen, Valo Research and Trading, Planmeca, Reaktor, Comptel, and Goldman Sachs) Com­pet­ence The Master of Science degree qualifies you for demanding expert positions and postgraduate education in Finnish and international doctoral programmes. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion Our multilingual Master’s programme is highly international. The Department hosts a large number of international students and staff members. In addition, the University of Helsinki and the Faculty of Science provide many opportunities for international engagement: Student exchange at one of the destinations available through the Faculty or the University International traineeships English-language teaching offered by the Faculty Master’s thesis project as a member of one of the international research groups operating under the programme Cooperation with international students enrolled in the programme International duties in subject-specific student organisations or the Student Union of the University of Helsinki Language courses organised by the Language Centre of the University of Helsinki The Faculty of Science is a top research institute in its fields among European universities. Its partners include many leading international research institutes, such as the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO). As a student at the Faculty of Science, you will have the opportunity to complete a research traineeship period at, for example, CERN in Geneva. By completing a traineeship at one of the internationally active research groups on campus you will be able to acquaint yourself and network with the international scientific community during your Master’s studies. The international student exchange programmes available at the University provide numerous opportunities to complete part of your degree at a university abroad. Net­work­ing As a student in the Master’s programme, you can complete elective studies in disciplines offered by the Faculty of Science or other faculties at the University of Helsinki. If necessary, you can also complete studies at other Finnish universities under the Flexible Study Right Agreement (JOO), which makes it easy for you to study for your degree based on your personal interests and career goals. Some of the courses included in the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, for example, are provided in cooperation with the University of Turku. In addition, many students of the Faculty participate in hands-on research in a research project in their field during their studies. You can also write your Master’s thesis in collaboration with companies or research organisations; this is a popular and valuable way to enhance your career skills. The Master’s programme cooperates closely with the Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP), the Finnish Meteorological Institute and the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI). Re­search fo­cus The Master’s programme has a strong research focus, demonstrated by the fact that a significant number of our graduates continue on to postgraduate studies. Researchers on the Kumpula Campus conduct top-level research in many fields connected to the programme, such as theoretical and experimental particle physics, cosmology, space physics, and astronomy. The research is carried out in close cooperation with the Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP), the Finnish Meteorological Institute and the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI). [-]

Master in Philosophy

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

The goal of the Master’s Programme in Philosophy is to provide you with systematic knowledge of philosophy as an independent field of science and of its specialisation fields, as well as to enhance your skills of philosophical analysis and argumentation. In addition, the Master’s programme provides you with the skills necessary to conduct independent philosophical analyses through both spoken and written media. [+]

The goal of the Master’s Programme in Philosophy is to provide you with systematic knowledge of philosophy as an independent field of science and of its specialisation fields, as well as to enhance your skills of philosophical analysis and argumentation. In addition, the Master’s programme provides you with the skills necessary to conduct independent philosophical analyses through both spoken and written media. Philosophy graduates have been employed in a wide range of positions. Most of them work as researchers and teachers at institutions of higher education, general upper secondary schools and other educational institutions. Others serve in very different positions, often in jobs focusing less on a narrow field of specialisation and more on understanding broader issues, such as in communications as well as administration and planning duties. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The languages of instruction are English, Finnish and Swedish. You have the right to use Finnish or Swedish to complete your studies regardless of the language of instruction. Pro­gramme con­tents Philosophy deals with the most fundamental and universal questions about the world and people’s place in it. Central topics include knowledge, reality, the mind, meaning, truth, science, society, action, value, and right and wrong. In Finland, philosophy has traditionally been divided into theoretical philosophy, and practical philosophy. The contents of the degree follow this division. The study track of philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction represents a tradition in which this division does not exist. The degree programme in philosophy covers all central areas of philosophy. In addition to the general studies shared by all, you can specialise in a specific field of philosophy. If you are particularly interested in social phenomena and wish to complete a Master of Social Sciences degree, choose practical philosophy or the equivalent content in philosophy in Swedish. If you are interested in other areas of philosophy, it is recommended that you complete a Master of Arts degree. During the course of studies in practical philosophy, you will explore basic issues of human activity and society, as well as common philosophical dilemmas in the field of social sciences. Theoretical philosophy focuses on the traditional core questions of philosophy, which pertain to the structure of reality, the nature and possibility of knowledge, the relationship of language and the mind to reality, and the rules of competent deduction. It encompasses logic, metaphysics, epistemology, the history of philosophy, philosophy of science, philosophy of language, and philosophy of the mind. Metaphysics studies the fundamental nature of existence. Epistemology examines the general criteria for the justification or rationality of knowledge or belief. The history of philosophy follows the development of the main fields of theoretical and practical philosophy from antiquity to the present day. The particular focus of the philosophy of science is scientific knowledge, deduction and explanation. Logic examines the rules of formally competent deduction, formal languages and the philosophical applications of logical conceptual analysis. Research in the philosophy of language focuses on the relationship between language and reality as well as the nature of linguistic meaning and language use, while the philosophy of mind investigates the nature of mental states and events as well as their relationship with the brain and reality. Practical philosophy studies the conceptual foundations of morality and society. The studies concentrate on conceptual issues related to norms, values and ideologies as well as on how various normative claims can be justified. Applied ethics examines concrete moral problems in the light of theories of normative ethics. The philosophy of social science studies the principles of concept and theory formation as well as their epistemological and logical foundations. It also explores the nature and development of the social sciences, the special methods of mathematics and logic they apply, social ontology, and the relationship of the social sciences to society at large. In addition to examining the fields described above, the study track of philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction analyses the problem of the Enlightenment, contemporary philosophical criticism and the tradition of Socratic philosophy in which fundamental issues of knowledge, existence and morality are viewed as conceptually inseparable. The history of philosophy follows the development of the main fields of philosophy, from antiquity to the present day. The studies consist of lectures, seminars, book examinations, end-of-course examinations, essays, theses and brief presentations. The discipline also has several active research seminars, which allow you to follow the latest trends in international research. You should contact potential supervisors when you are selecting your thesis topic. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor Students admitted to the Master’s Programme in Philosophy graduate with a Master of Arts or Master of Social Sciences degree. The study tracks in theoretical philosophy (and philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction) as well as practical philosophy correspond to the above degrees. In other words, the following three study tracks are offered: Theoretical philosophy Practical philosophy Philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction When applying for the programme, you must inform us which degree you wish to pursue and which study track you wish to select. You can freely change your study track within the Master’s programme, but to graduate you must complete all the studies required for a single study track. Pro­gramme struc­ture The scope of the Master’s degree is 120 credits, comprising: Advanced studies (60–110 credits), including a Master’s thesis (30 credits) and other studies in the discipline Professional skills studies (5–15 credits), which can consist of a traineeship, a professional skills project or other studies that develop your professional skills Elective studies (max. 55 credits) Thesis The aim of the Master’s thesis is to train you in independent research work, the use of sources and research methods in the relevant discipline, academic presentation, and written communication. No original research or scientific results are required in the Master’s thesis. The recommended length of a Master’s thesis is 60–80 pages, but shorter or longer theses may also be accepted, depending on the nature of the research. Ca­reer pro­spects The Master’s programme trains researchers and subject teachers of philosophy for general upper secondary education. Studies in philosophy prepare you for all professions that require critical and exact thinking and the ability to write clearly and convincingly. The fundamental nature of the discipline and its capacity to provide both an all-round foundation and diverse opportunities for specialisation form an excellent basis for employment in a wide range of positions. Previous philosophy graduates have found employment in education, administration, communication and the commercial sector. According to a recent survey, 93% of American employers felt that the ability to think critically, communicate clearly, and solve complex problems is more important than a candidate’s major subject. A suitable combination of expertise in philosophy and other areas enables you to work in a wide range of intellectually challenging jobs. Com­pet­ence Students admitted to the Master’s Programme in Philosophy can obtain the qualifications required of subject teachers of philosophy and/or ethics by completing the Master’s degree, pedagogical studies for teachers, and studies in the teaching subject (see below). Studies required for subject competence in philosophy: If you wish to qualify as a subject teacher of philosophy as your first teaching subject, you must complete basic, intermediate and advanced studies (including a Master’s thesis) in philosophy. If you wish to qualify as a subject teacher of philosophy as your second teaching subject, you must complete basic and intermediate studies (60 credits) in philosophy. Studies required for subject competence in ethics: If you wish to qualify as a subject teacher of ethics as your second teaching subject, you must complete basic and intermediate studies (60 credits) in ethics. As a graduate with teaching qualifications in ethics and philosophy, you can work in comprehensive and general upper secondary schools or in other educational institutions (e.g., universities of applied sciences and adult education centres). In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion Studying philosophy at the University of Helsinki provides excellent opportunities for gaining international experience: The most common option is to become an exchange student at one of the Faculty’s or University’s partner institutions abroad. You can complete part of your degree studies at a university outside of Finland. The philosophy disciplines have several Erasmus and Nordplus exchange agreements with European universities. Another option is to complete a traineeship abroad. You can help international students as a peer tutor. You can be involved in the international activities of the subject organisations or the University’s Student Union. You can also improve your language skills and cultural knowledge by participating in the language courses of the University of Helsinki Language Centre. A bilingual degree (in Finnish and Swedish) provides you with access to the Nordic job market. Re­search fo­cus The University of Helsinki’s discipline of philosophy has a long and renowned tradition of research in logic and the philosophy of science. High-quality research is also carried out in other key areas of philosophy. Theoretical philosophy focuses on logic, the history of philosophy, epistemology and metaphysics. Practical philosophy focuses on ethics, political philosophy and philosophy of social science. The history of philosophy is also studied in practical philosophy. In addition, expert guidance and supervision are available in philosophy of language and philosophy of mind. The Centre of Excellence in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences operates in conjunction with the programme in philosophy, as do several Academy of Finland research projects. The discipline also has several active research seminars, which allow you to follow the latest trends in international research. Research Seminar in Philosophy Philosophy of Science Seminar Moral and Political Philosophy Research Seminar History of Philosophy Research Seminar [-]

Master in Plant Biology

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

The Master’s Programme in Plant Biology is a joint programme of the Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences and the Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, which ensures an exceptionally comprehensive curriculum. You will be able to study the diversity of wild and cultivated plants from the Arctic to the Tropics, as well as plant functions from the molecular to the ecosystem level. [+]

Life on Earth depends on solar energy captured by plants - they are the base of most food webs and underpin the functioning of all major ecosystems. Plants release the oxygen we breath. They convert solar energy into chemical energy, providing us with food, fibres, renewable energy sources, and raw materials for many industries. Plants do not carry out these processes in isolation. They interact with other organisms and the physical and chemical environment, communicate and actively adjust to their circumstances. How do they do these things and how can we profit from understanding them? When you have graduated from the Master’s Program in Plant Biology you will have the answers to these big questions, and more, such as: How one plant cell develops into a complicated organism and how plant cells, tissues and organs communicate with each other How plants avoid, tolerate or defend themselves from external stress factors such as diseases, drought and excessive solar radiation How plants sense their environment and communicate with each other and with other organisms How plants, interacting with microbes, fungi and animals, maintain ecosystems and thus life How the genotypic, functional and morphological differences between plants allow them to thrive in vastly different habitats You will also be able to: Understand how research in plant biology and biotechnology can contribute to plant breeding and production Plan, coordinate and execute high-quality basic and applied scientific research Have a good command of the scientific method and critically evaluate research across scientific disciplines Use the basic skills needed to expand your knowledge into other related fields and communicate with experts in those fields Act in working life as an expert and innovator in your field, supported by your language, communication and other transferable skills Be eligible for scientific post-graduate (doctoral) studies After earning your degree, you can continue towards a PhD or move directly into a career. If you have a Bachelor’s degree in a field of biology from another Finnish university or from a foreign university anywhere in the world, you are welcome to apply for the Master’s programme in Plant Biology. Based on your previous studies we will evaluate the possible need for supplementary studies, which will be included in your degree. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion English is the main teaching language. Because the programme is multilingual, you can take your examinations, write your thesis and fulfil other programme requirements in English, Finnish or Swedish. Pro­gramme con­tents The Master’s Programme in Plant Biology is a joint programme of the Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences and the Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, which ensures an exceptionally comprehensive curriculum. You will be able to study the diversity of wild and cultivated plants from the Arctic to the Tropics, as well as plant functions from the molecular to the ecosystem level. The teaching is diverse, consisting of modern laboratory and computer courses, field courses, seminars and excursions. The curriculum is intertwined with research. You will be introduced to the research groups from the beginning of your studies, so you will become familiar with research methods as your studies progress. Much of the study material is in various learning platforms (such as Moodle), which allow distance learning. You will have a personal tutor who will help you tailor an individual study plan according to your requirements. Within the programme you can choose among several optional study modules and focus on, for example: Plant biotechnology and breeding Molecular biology and genetics Regulation of growth, reproduction and differentiation of tissues Biological basis of crop yield Plant ecology and evolutionary biology Evolutionary history and systematics of plants and fungi Species identification All modules are worth at least 15 credits. They are interlinked to ensure a coherent and balanced degree that allows you to obtain a broad perspective. Alternatively, you can focus on your primary research interest while acquiring the skills needed to follow your career goals on completion of your degree. A translational perspective is emphasised in courses in which it is relevant. That will allow you to apply the acquired basic knowledge in problem-based research, bridging the gap between basic and applied research. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor By choosing study modules you find interesting you will be able to deepen your expertise in particular areas of plant biology. Your degree can thus be tailored depending on your aspirations, whether you want to be a university researcher, entrepreneur, or environmental/agricultural consultant. You will also be free to pick individual courses from any module, without having to take all courses in it. However, each module is a coherent entity so we recommend that you take all of the courses in it. Pro­gramme struc­ture The extent of the programme is 120 credits (ECTS), to be completed in two years of full-time studies. The degree consists of 60 credits of advanced studies (in plant biology), including Master’s thesis (30 credits) 60 credits of other studies from this programme or other programmes The curriculum contains a personal study plan and it can contain career planning or transferable skill studies. Thesis By completing your Master’s thesis (30 credits) you will show that You are capable of scientific thinking You are able to design and carry out experiments under supervision You are profoundly familiar with the topic of your thesis You are capable of effective written scientific communication A Master’s thesis project usually consists of four distinct phases Design and planning of the study Gathering the data (field work and/or laboratory work and/or mathematical modelling) Analysing the data (validation/quality control, statistical analysis, plotting) Interpreting and discussing the results in the light of existing literature on the topic Typically, the work is carried out in a research project in which you have a clearly defined and independent role. You must write the thesis yourself. Your work will be supervised by a person, such as a professor or lecturer, who has a PhD in the same field of research and who knows the topic and the relevant courses well. Upon completing your Master’s project, you will understand how a research project proceeds, from planning the work to carrying it out and reporting the results. Ca­reer pro­spects With a Master’s degree in Plant Biology, you will have many potential career opportunities. You can work especially As a researcher and/or part-time teacher at universities or other institutions of higher education As a researcher in national and international institutions in the public and private sectors As an expert, civil servant, authority or PR officer in public administration In various positions in international organisations or enterprises engaged in bioeconomy As an entrepreneur in the biological or environmental sectors of business Com­pet­ence In addition to the job prospects listed above, you will be eligible for doctoral studies in relevant doctoral programmes in Finland, Europe or anywhere in the world. For doctoral programmes at the University of Helsinki, please see item 12 below. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion International scope is a key benefit of the Plant Biology programme. You will be encouraged and helped to seek exchange possibilities in international student exchange programmes with cooperating universities. In this way you will get new ideas, perspectives and personal contacts that may prove useful later in your working life or doctoral studies. All of our research groups include numerous members from Europe and farther afield. Thus you will be doing research in an international community and will be able to improve your skills in foreign languages, especially English, which is of primary importance in working life today. You can also tutor international students or act in the student’s subject association or Student’s Union and get valuable experience of international and multicultural communities. Net­work­ing Such a multifaceted programme is only possible through the joint efforts of various parties. Therefore the teaching and research is carried out in cooperation with the Institute of Biotechnology, Botany Unit of the Finnish Museum of Natural History, Natural Resources Institute in Finland, Plant Biotechnology Unit of the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finnish Food Safety Authority EVIRA, and Boreal Plant Breeding Ltd. company. This ensures that you will have good prospects for jobs or apprenticeships. The experimental greenhouses and outdoor fields on the Viikki campus are also used for teaching purposes. The five field stations in Finland owned by the University of Helsinki are a valuable asset and the venues for numerous field courses. Of the stations, Tvärminne Zoological Station is located on the southern coast, Lammi Biological Station and Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in the southern inland, and Värriö Subarctic Research Station and Kilpisjärvi Biological Station in Lapland, in the north of Finland. At the Taita Hills Research Station in Kenya, East Africa, you can have a completely different, once-in-a-lifetime learning experience. Re­search fo­cus All teaching is based on the latest scientific knowledge. Research in Plant Biology is advancing on many fronts. It operates from the molecular and cellular levels to the ecosystem level, and covers both wild and cultivated plants. The main focus areas are regulation of plant development and differentiation of tissues and organs; crop yield and breeding of cultivated plants; stress responses; population ecology of fungal plant diseases; and evolution, ecology, genetics, genomics and biotechnology of plants and fungi. Studying Plant Biology will involve you in fascinating research projects looking for solutions to many current problems. Viikki Plant Science Centre (ViPS) is a virtual, internationally recognised community of researchers based on the Viikki campus. It includes plant researchers working in different units and faculties within the campus. Its purpose is to advance and expedite cooperation in high-standard teaching and research. As a student you will be part of the ViPS community through the courses, seminars, apprenticeships and degree work offered by the Master’s Programme in Plant Biology. [-]

Master in Theoretical and Computational Methods

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

The basis of natural sciences is the modelling of phenomena and solving these models. The Master’s programme in theoretical and computational methods will give you a strong basis in the theoretical methods, modelling, and mathematical and numerical analysis within physics, mathematics, chemistry and/or computer science. [+]

The basis of natural sciences is the modelling of phenomena and solving these models. The Master’s programme in theoretical and computational methods will give you a strong basis in the theoretical methods, modelling, and mathematical and numerical analysis within physics, mathematics, chemistry and/or computer science. The special feature of this programme is that you can combine the above disciplines into a comprehensive programme. It is well suited for the needs of basic research and for many fields of application. This programme requires a strong commitment from you to develop your own skills and plan your degree. You can tailor your programme according to your existing knowledge and interests, in cooperation with the programme professors. The programme’s strong scientific emphasis makes it a natural gateway to further studies in physics, mathematics, chemistry, and computer science. This will usually take place within one of the research groups working on the Kumpula campus. Upon completing the Master’s programme, you will: Have a solid basis of skills in your chosen scientific field Have good skills in analytical and computational thinking and deduction Be able to apply theoretical and computational methods to the analysis and understanding of problems in various fields Be able to generalise information on scientific phenomena, and identify the inner relationships Be able to create mathematical models of natural phenomena Be able to solve the models, both analytically and numerically As a graduate of this Master’s programme you can work as an expert in many kinds of scientific jobs in the private and the public sectors. The employment rate in this field is good. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The programme is multi-lingual. Instruction is given in English, but the courses and assignments can also be done in Finnish or Swedish. The programme has an international study track that you can take completely in English, but you have to apply separately for this study track. Pro­gramme con­tents The special feature of this programme is its great scope: it consists of several modules in physics, mathematics, chemistry, and/or computer science. Out of these, you may select a suitable group of subjects according to your interests and the courses you took for your Bachelor's degree. The programme incorporates modules from e.g. the following areas: Theoretical physics Mathematics Cosmology and particle physics Computational physics Physical chemistry Laser spectroscopy Mathematical physics and stochastics Applied analysis Software engineering Theoretical computer science The courses include group and lecture instruction, exercises, literature, and workshops. Most courses also include exams or project assignments. In addition, you can complete some courses independently, by taking exams. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor This Master’s programme does not have any study track; instead, can can tailor a suitable combination according to your plans and existing knowledge from the modules in physics, mathematics, chemistry, and computer science. Your personal study plan will ensure that your courses will form a functional combination. Pro­gramme struc­ture The Master’s programme comprises 120 credits (ECTS) and it is possible to complete the degree in two academic years. The degree includes: 90 credits of courses in the Master’s programme, including the Master’s thesis (Pro gradu) of 30 credits 30 credits of other courses from your Master’s programme or other programmes Your studies will include a personal study plan, working-life orientation, and career planning. The other studies could also include a traineeship, complementary courses in your major or minor subject, or a completely new minor subject. Thesis The advanced module of your major subject includes a Master’s thesis that will demonstrate your ability for scientific thinking, your command of scientific methods, your mastery of the topic of your thesis, and your aptitude for scientific communication. The extent of the Master’s thesis is 30 credits. The thesis is often written under the supervision of one of the research groups in the departments belonging to this programme, so you will become familiar with top research during your Master's programme. These projects are a natural gateway to postgraduate studies. Ca­reer pro­spects The Master’s degree in sciences applying theoretical and computational methods gives you an excellent basis for postgraduate studies or for work in many careers in Finland or internationally. Masters of Science employed within research and R&D in industry are very well paid. On the other hand, a career at the university or a research institute lets you carry out academic research on a topic of your own choosing. As a graduate with an MSc degree you could embark on a career in: Industry, especially advanced technology corporations (applied research and R&D, leadership), Universities and research institutes abroad and in Finland (basic scientific research) Teaching in universities and universities of applied sciences Software engineering, e.g. gaming industry Various design and consultation jobs in the public and private sectors Graduates of similar programmes in the earlier degree system have found employment as researchers and teachers in universities and research institutes in Finland and abroad (e.g. CERN, ESA, NASA), for example, in administration (e.g. the Finnish Academy), and in private corporations. The strong analytical skills provided by the education are sought after in areas such as data analysis (industries, media companies, gaming industry, finance), and corporate research, product development, and consultation (e.g. Nokia, Ericsson, Apple, Sanoma, Spinverse, Supercell, Nielsen, Valo Research and Trading, Planmeca, Reaktor, Comptel, Vaisala, KaVo Kerr Group, IndoorAtlas and Goldman Sachs). Com­pet­ence The Master’s degree (Master of Science) is an upper university degree that qualifies you for many expert duties and for postgraduate studies in doctoral programmes both in Finland and internationally. By combining the Master’s programme with courses in pedagogy, you can gain competence to work as a teacher on the secondary school level. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion The Master’s programme works in a very international atmosphere, with many top researchers from Finland and abroad teaching in it. If you write your MSc thesis in one of the research groups, you will get first-hand experience of work in an international research project. In addition, the University of Helsinki and the Faculty of Science offer you many opportunities for international activities: Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university Traineeships abroad Courses given in English within the faculty Cooperation with students in the international programme International tasks within the students’ organisations or union Language courses at the Language Centre of the University of Helsinki The Faculty of Science aims to be at the cutting edge of European research within its disciplines. The collaboration partners include several top international research centres, such as CERN, ESA, ESRF, and ITER.R. As a graduate student at the Faculty of Science, you will be able to apply for research training at places such as CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, or the ESRF centre in Grenoble, France. A traineeship in one of the internationally active research groups on campus will enable you to acquaint yourself and form contacts with the international research community during your studies. In addition, the international exchange programmes offer many opportunities for you to complete part of your degree at a foreign university. Net­work­ing As a Master’s degree student, you can select your minor subject both from your own faculty and from the other faculties at the university. Thanks to the contract for flexible study access (JOO), you can also study at another university in Finland, so it will be easy to tailor your degree to your own interests and career goals. Some of the courses are organised in cooperation with Aalto University. You can also participate in research projects in your field while you are studying. Writing your Master’s thesis is cooperation with a corporation or research organisation is also a good way to improve your working-life skills. The programme has close collaboration with the Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP) and Helsinki Institute for Information Technology (HIIT). The programme maintains contacts with its alumni within the corporate sector. You can develop your own business concepts at the university’s entrepreneurship courses and at Think Company, which is a new kind of communal meeting point for students and researchers interested in starting their own business, as well as for entrepreneurs in different fields. Re­search fo­cus This Master’s programme is strongly orientated towards research. At the Kumpula campus, top research is being carried out in many of the disciplines included in the programme, such as theoretical particle physics, cosmology, computational material physics, aerosol physics, mathematical physics, inversion problems, theoretical chemistry, laser spectroscopy, and algorithm theory. The instruction in the programme is given by the researchers in these groups. This Master’s programme will give you a solid basis for continuing with postgraduate studies and research in one of these areas. The programme cooperates with Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP) and Helsinki Institute for Information Technology (HIIT) and collaborates with the centres of excellence for Analysis and dynamics research, Inverse problems and Atmospheric sciences. [-]

Master in Urban Studies and Planning

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

The Master’s Programme in Urban Studies and Planning prepares you to excel as a professional capable of understanding and addressing complex urban development challenges. You will learn to address such challenges through a curriculum and pedagogical approach that includes interdisciplinary breadth as well as depth in core areas of knowledge, skills and practice. [+]

Gen­eral Know­ledge and Skills Upon completing the master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning, you will be able to: Understand theories and identify concepts and empirical research methods relevant to urban studies and planning from the related fields of social sciences, humanities, ecology, engineering, architecture, design and art Demonstrate a working understanding of the role of urban government, policy-making and planning in urban development Critically and creatively pose and answer significant research questions relevant within and across multiple fields of theory and practice Gather, process and develop relevant conclusions based on information from multiple sources Produce, collect and analyse cases and data relevant to urban phenomena Use digital and other tools to collect, analyse and share data Develop responses to urban problems using relevant tools and techniques for representing, modelling, prototyping, testing and evaluating solutions Understand and develop integrated approaches within and across urban research and applied planning Communicate your understanding of and responses to urban phenomena visually, graphically, orally and in writing Write academic, professional and popular texts on urban themes based on relevant literature Apply and develop skills for co-production of knowledge and co-design Work productively and cooperatively in multidisciplinary, multiprofessional and international environments Know­ledge and Skills Re­lated to Spe­cial­isa­tions and Pro­fes­sions Upon completing the Master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning, you will be able to: Apply the general knowledge and skills introduced, developed and demonstrated within the courses and thesis work Place urban analyses and proposals in relation to your specialisation and contextualise them in relation to others Identify, differentiate and articulate relations among various theories and methods relevant to your specialisation Develop and reflect on your competence in urban studies and planning in relation to your professional role Carry out independent research on urban issues in your field using relevant research methods and responsible scientific practice Analyse phenomena and develop solutions through the use of digital and other tools, such as GIS and CAD Fulfil specific professional degrees in accordance with the relevant professional codes and directives (such as those of architects, landscape architects, and urban planners Demonstrate your competence to work as a professional and/or researcher in urban studies and planning Communicate professionally and constructively with different experts, practitioners and stakeholders in the field of urban studies and planning Articulate your professional identity in terms of established and emerging roles relevant to urban studies and planning The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 15 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion All teaching is in English. You can also take exams in Finnish or Swedish, and write your Master’s thesis in Finnish or Swedish. Pro­gramme con­tents Urbanisation is a global phenomenon that is shaping the future of our societies. Most of the key challenges of contemporary societies are encountered and addressed in cities. Cities provide enormous economic, technical and cultural opportunities, but they are also places of social conflict and segregation as well as environmental and health problems. The magnitude of these challenges implies that no single profession or field of research can tackle them. Urban development requires an integrated approach. To this end, two prominent Finnish universities have joined forces in this unique and interdisciplinary Master’s programme. The Master’s Programme in Urban Studies and Planning prepares you to excel as a professional capable of understanding and addressing complex urban development challenges. You will learn to address such challenges through a curriculum and pedagogical approach that includes interdisciplinary breadth as well as depth in core areas of knowledge, skills and practice. The programme balances theoretical, historical and conceptual knowledge with the acquisition of methods, skills and experience. You will thus gain a broad understanding of urban phenomena as well as practical experience in collaborative and practical situations. This is the foundation of the programme and of the elements in the curriculum. Taking full advantage of the joint university structure, the programme unites leading expertise from the University of Helsinki and Aalto University into three major study lines. The signature elements in the programme are interdisciplinary studies that address urban challenge themes. These themes relate to urgent contemporary issues found not only in Finland but on the European and global scale, including controversies intrinsic to urbanisation. The urban challenge themes may be attached to focus areas, research projects or collaborations within our universities, municipalities and regions in order to provide a constructive and critical framework for study and practice. These themes cross the boundaries of disciplines and professions, and are united in addressing a common challenge and emphasising a forward-looking perspective. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor There are three study lines in the Master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning: Urban Plan­ning and Design Urban Planning and Design (USP Plans) addresses urban development by integrating the knowledge, skills and pedagogical approaches of planning and design and by developing synergies across multiple disciplines. The constructive power of design to imagine, structure, visualise and communicate is combined with the analytical rigour and critical understanding of planning and urban governance history, methodologies and tools. USP Plans develops and deepens such skills while advancing your professional capabilities through challenge-based learning within concrete cases, multi-disciplinary collaboration, and learning-by-doing experimentation. USP Plans is oriented towards planners, architects, landscape architects, and spatial, service and strategic designers. Urban Life, Eco­nomy and Cul­tures Urban Life, Economy and Cultures (USP Peoples) addresses urban development by integrating analysis of socio-economic, digital and physical structures with planning. Here you will explore and apply theories and methodologies from the social and political sciences. The focus is on socio-spatial dynamics changes, including influences of policies and markets, actors and structures, decision-making processes, social mixing and demographics. USP Peoples deepens your knowledge of foundational studies while advancing your professional capabilities through challenge-based and collaborative learning, including situated municipal and field studies. USP Peoples is oriented towards planners, urban economists and managers and those interested in urban humanities. Urban Eco­lo­gies and Sys­tems Urban Ecologies and Systems (USP Systems) addresses urban development by integrating technical and natural science knowledge. This includes methodologies for studying, assessing and planning for social and ecological resilience, technological innovation and complex adaptive systems. It applies systems approaches to identify multi-dimensional planning while retaining a holistic perspective on the complex and historical dynamics affecting multiple scales. USP Systems develops your understanding of foundational studies while advancing your professional capabilities through challenge-based and collaborative learning, including urban, digital and ecological field studies. USP Systems is oriented towards planners, engineers, architects, landscape architects, and environmental managers. Pro­gramme struc­ture The requirement for completing the Master’s programme in Urban Studies and Planning is 120 credits (ECTS), which can be done in two years. The curriculum consists of: Core Urban Challenge Studios (20 credits) Common urban challenge studios integrate multiple expert areas to study and address contemporary urban phenomena from different perspectives. Here you will explore urban challenge themes theoretically from different perspectives and you will address them practically within specific cases, sites or initiatives. Your teachers represent key disciplines and professions, and your studies will be conducted in cooperation with partners in research and municipalities. Examples of urban challenge themes include: Urban economies and the challenge of governance and welfare Social integration and the challenge of urban typologies and heritage Liveability and the global challenge of fast-paced cities Socio-Ecological habitats and the challenge of densification Specialisation coursework (20 credits) The three study lines offer courses for you to specialise within one of the three competence areas in the broad field of urban studies and planning. Both universities offer courses for each study line; these can be adapted to support your advancement, background knowledge and skills. The courses cover topics such as urban geography, urban sociology, urban ecology, urban economics, urban ethnology and history, environmental policy, urban planning, urban design, landscape architecture, real estate economics, service and strategic design, etc. Core skills and methods coursework (20 credits) Core skills for thesis research and professional practice are offered as basic courses. These include skills relevant to digital representation, analysis and communication, modalities and techniques of communication and argumentation, research methods and methodologies of academic research. You will learn, for example, how to use digital tools to analyse and study urban phenomena and how to illustrate your ideas and solutions visually and graphically. You will also become familiar with the theories and tools of communication and argumentation, and you will study and apply research methods. Electives (30 credits) You can select elective courses according to your personal study plan. You can select electives to deepen your knowledge in a specialisation or broaden your exposure to additional areas relevant to planning. For architects and landscape architects, some electives will guide your development according to the EU directive for these professions. You can also take courses at other Finnish universities, in a student exchange abroad, or in an internship in city planning and development. Master’s Thesis (30 credits) Thesis Your Master’s thesis in the Urban Studies and Planning programme can take one of several forms: an independent scholarly research project; a directed thesis within a larger research project in one of the universities; or a professionally-oriented thesis developed in the context of a cooperating partner. In particular, you are encouraged to build upon your work in the urban challenge studios, which will provide a context for collaboration and guidance. Particularly in the studios, you can research and write a thesis together with another student or students. In all cases, your thesis must be original, creative work conceived and developed by you. We recommend that supervision for your thesis includes at least three experts from two or more of the study lines, and that the subject of your thesis should be relevant across two or more study lines. Ca­reer pro­spects The programme prepares you to be a professional in a field that is meaningful, growing and in demand. You will acquire the knowledge, skills and experience needed to fill both traditional and emerging planning roles (such as urban planning and design, real estate development, strategic planning, environmental planning, landscape architecture, policy and service design). To these established or emerging roles, you will bring an integrated understanding of, and training in applying, more interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches to urban development. As a graduate you will be prepared to compete for local and international positions within public, private and non-profit organisations, planning, architectural and policy advisory firms, research institutes and NGOs. Com­pet­ence The program offers different degrees – MPhil, M.Soc.Sc., MSc (arch.), MSc (eng.), MA – that ensure sufficient expertise to work in established and emerging expert roles in urban development in the public and private sectors, in Finland and internationally. Degree qualification in architecture and landscape architecture is provided for students who have a BSc in technology or architecture and have taken complementary courses in the Aalto Department of Architecture. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion The Master’s Programme in Urban Studies & Planning provides international scope in many ways, taking advantage of the unique Helsinki context and diverse urban contexts around the world. Each year, new students in the Master’s Programme in Urban Studies & Planning include both Finnish and international applicants. We look for students whose varied backgrounds, experiences, and education reflect the richness of contemporary society. The teachers of the programme have an international background and experience, and the programme builds on their strong international connections in their respective fields. Researchers and invited lecturers from abroad take part in the teaching of the programme. The Master’s Programme builds on the joint University of Helsinki and Aalto University Bachelor’s Program ‘Urban Academy’, including its teaching faculty, international network and advisory board of leading international experts. Your elective coursework can include a student exchange or internship abroad, and you are also encouraged to collaborate internationally on your Master’s thesis. You will thus have an opportunity to study in an international environment and acquaint yourself with different cultures. For international and Finnish students, Helsinki and Finland are well-known internationally for progressive approaches to planning. Helsinki is a UNESCO creative city; planning and design have strong roles within municipalities, government and the public sector. Finland is a European and international forerunner in technological research and innovation, such as open data in municipalities. Local and national policies support experimental and participatory culture and development. In the context of urban challenges, Helsinki provides a unique case for engaging with progressive approaches to welfare state paradigms, including public-private dynamics, changing demographics and cultures, and diverse approaches to market growth and sustainability. Net­work­ing The Master’s Programme in Urban Studies & Planning is profoundly interdisciplinary and multi-sectoral. The programme combines the most important fields of urban studies from the University of Helsinki and Aalto University into a progressive and interdisciplinary curriculum. Courses include extensive co-teaching to ensure multiple perspectives on core topics. There are continual exchanges among disciplines and between theory and practice, for example through dynamic ‘learning-by-doing’ pedagogical approaches within urban challenge studios. Building on the established joint Bachelor programme, the Master’s Programme further develops multiple forms of collaboration with the City of Helsinki. The programme includes collaboration with other city administrations, local media, civil society organisations, heritage and cultural institutions, think-tanks and companies. In Finland and in these universities, societal impact is highly valued and effectively implemented in education and research. Re­search fo­cus Coursework and Master’s theses within the Master’s Programme in Urban Studies & Planning benefit from the research expertise within both universities and many associated professors. The professors and faculty are active and highly successful in applying for and carrying out projects funded by Finnish, Nordic and European foundations. Some examples of the range of ongoing and current topics include: Vibrant Urban Economies, Welfare and Finance Liveable Cities, Accessibility and Connectivity Urban Sustainability and Socio-Ecological Resilience Urban Ecosystem Ecology and Ecosystem Services Urban Environmental and Social Governance and Justice Urban Policies, Cultures and Socio-Economic Differentiation Socio-Spatial mixing, Social Control and Social Cohesion Nordic Welfare states and Ethnic Residential Segregation Creative Knowledge and the Competitiveness of Metropolitan Regions Metropolitan Regions within the European Union Urban Poverty and Competitive Cities Urban Vulnerability, Adaptability and Resilience Education and Effects on Lifestyles and Neighbourhoods Governance of Urban and Complex Adaptive Systems Urban Energy, Communications and Transport Systems Citizen-Centred Service Design and Urban Product-Service-Systems Transition towards Sustainable and Liveable Urban Futures Systemic Urban Governance for Social Cohesion Historical Portrayal and Meanings of the City Production of Citizenship and Citizen Participation Political, Social, Cultural and Linguistic Urban Identities Urban Architectural Morphologies and Landscapes Markets and Urban Industries, Work and Leisure Development of Planning Professional Roles Transdisciplinary Pedagogies for ‘Wicked’ Planning Problems Urban Natures, Blue-Green Systems and Landscape Planning Productive Food Landscapes and Urban Sustainability [-]

MA

Master in English Studies

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

The Master’s programme in English Studies helps you develop your expertise in areas that are often separated in other programmes: English language and linguistics, literature in English, and the teaching of English. Upon graduation, you will have excellent command of the English language. By working in a stimulating environment with accomplished researchers and teachers, you will also develop other skills needed in your future career, such as skills in presentation, independent and group work, and project management. [+]

The Master’s programme in English Studies helps you develop your expertise in areas that are often separated in other programmes: English language and linguistics, literature in English, and the teaching of English. Upon graduation, you will have excellent command of the English language. By working in a stimulating environment with accomplished researchers and teachers, you will also develop other skills needed in your future career, such as skills in presentation, independent and group work, and project management. An MA in English Studies prepares you for a variety of jobs, and our graduates have been successful in finding employment. If combined with mandatory pedagogical studies, the Master’s degree in English Studies qualifies you to be a language teacher. Alternatively, you can find employment in media or publishing, business, or international organisations where language skills are required. English is used globally as the language of science, culture, business and tourism, and experts in English are required in all of these fields. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 13 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion For the most part, the language of instruction is English, and the studies are completed in English. You can take pedagogical studies (teacher training) in Finnish or English Pro­gramme con­tents Courses in English Studies focus on several topics relating to the English language, literatures in English, and teaching English. You can choose to combine courses from one or more lines according to your interests. In Linguistics courses you will focus on the structure and uses of English as well as on language variation and change, sociolinguistics and corpus linguistics. In the Literature courses you will study several areas of the various literatures in English from narrative, cognitive, postcolonial and ecocritical perspectives. Courses in Applied Linguistics are tailored especially for future language teachers. As a student in English Studies, you will attend lectures but also work in collaboration with other students, partly in digital learning environments. To assess your learning progress, several methods are used, such as examinations, essays and learning diaries. In English Studies you will also practice your spoken and presentation skills. During your Master’s studies, you can Progress further in your linguistic or literary studies and choose the most interesting courses Strengthen your understanding of theory in your chosen field Strengthen your language skills, academic writing skills and presentation skills Participate in research projects Participate in the Master’s thesis seminar, during which you will write your thesis Complete studies abroad as an exchange student (if you have not done so already) Complete practical training, by working as a trainee or a substitute teacher, for instance Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor You can choose between two specialisations, Teacher Training and General. For the teacher’s specialisation, pedagogical studies are mandatory, and there is a separate selection process for these studies. If you choose the General specialisation, you can combine English Studies with other studies according to your interests. Pro­gramme struc­ture The scope of the Master’s degree is 120 credits (ECTS). The degree contains the following studies: Advanced studies in the discipline (60–120 credits) and If needed, you can take other courses to achieve the minimum credit requirement for the degree (a total of 120 credits). With full-time studies you should be able to complete the Master’s degree in two years. During your Master’s studies, you will focus mainly on your specialization, deepening your knowledge through coursework and writing your Master’s thesis. The advanced studies in your specialization subject include professional skills courses, which are typically completed as practical training. Depending on your interests, you can also include elective subjects and other supporting studies. To help you complete your studies systematically, you will prepare a personal study plan (PSP) at the beginning of your Master’s studies, with support especially from the programme staff and from the Faculty and University administrators. Thesis The Master’s programme culminates in writing your Master’s thesis, an independent scientific study. The aim of the Master’s thesis is to develop your skills required for conducting research. The most important of these include the ability to seek information independently, analyse and assess existing information critically, and produce and apply information independently. In addition, writing your Master’s thesis develops your project management skills and your mastery of an extensive body of knowledge. In English Studies, you will write your thesis in English. The aim of the Master’s thesis is to develop basic skills required for conducting research, including: Defining your chosen research problem in the context of previous research in the field Finding information independently and assessing this information critically Mastering the theories and research methods required in your work Analysing your data Communicating your results in a clear and logical format appropriate to the audience Given its scope and complexity, the Master’s thesis will help you develop research and project management skills which will be useful in a variety of professions. Ca­reer pro­spects English Studies will prepare you for several careers in business and culture, as well as in public administration and education: With careful selection of supporting studies, you can find employment in government, the media, libraries and other cultural institutions, national and international organisations, or tourism. If you complete pedagogical studies for subject teachers, you will be qualified to teach English at comprehensive and upper secondary schools as well as in adult education. After successfully completing your Master’s degree, you can also apply to continue your studies as a postgraduate student and later build a career as a university researcher or teacher. The University of Helsinki has the most comprehensive selection of disciplines in Finland, making it easier for you to plan your specialization and supporting studies to benefit your future career. Feel free to include the ones you find most interesting and useful in your degree. Career-related stories by English graduates can be found at www.toissa.fi/ (in Finnish). Com­pet­ence Combined with mandatory pedagogical studies, a Master’s degree in English Studies gives you the qualifications required to become a language teacher. In order to qualify as an English teacher, you must complete: BA and MA studies in English (120 credits), usually together with studies in another discipline taught in schools, such as another language (60 credits); Pedagogical studies (60 credits; separate selection procedure during studies); and An MA degree. In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion During your studies, you can engage in international activities in many ways at foreign universities and in Finland. If you have not been on an international student exchange during your BA studies, you can do so while studying for your Master’s degree. During the exchange, you will complete part of your studies at a foreign university. A well-planned and well-timed student exchange offers you the opportunity to make the degree more diverse and enables you to discover new perspectives on your own studies. You can pursue an exchange visit either through an exchange programme or independently. All exchange programmes include a scholarship or a grant; the amount depends on the programme, the duration of the exchange visit and the target country. If you have arranged an exchange visit independently, you can apply for a travel grant. It is also possible to complete the practical training included in the Master’s degree abroad. You can also engage in international activities at the University of Helsinki. For instance, you can serve as a peer tutor for exchange students. The Faculty of Arts and the discipline of English philology have many teaching and research staff members who have an international background and who thus bring an international perspective to your studies. Net­work­ing The English Studies programme collaborates with several other Master’s programmes, for instance the MA programmes in Languages, Literary Studies and Finnish. During your studies, you can benefit from the expertise of teachers and collaborate with students in other MA programmes by taking joint courses offered in cooperation with these programmes. Re­search fo­cus The discipline of English philology is home to several research projects of various sizes in linguistics and literature, in which you can participate as part of your studies. A good way to become familiar with research is to write your Master’s thesis on one of the topics of a research project. Internationally, the discipline of English philology at Helsinki University is known for the study of the history, variation and change of the English language. Helsinki researchers are particularly well known for the digital text collections (corpora) they have compiled for research purposes. You can learn more about the research topics on the website of the VARIENG research unit. Other topics being studied by linguists here include English as a global language and lingua franca, academic discourse and academic writing, and digital or computer-mediated discourse. The methods through which these are studied are drawn from pragmatics, sociolinguistics and discourse analysis, among others. Literary studies in the discipline are also active – the staff members study all kinds of literature in English from the 1500s to the present. Key subjects include Anglo-American fiction, postcolonial and Native American literature, Renaissance drama and poetry, science fiction and fantasy. Primary material features novels, short stories, poems and plays, and the methods employed include narratological, postcolonial and cognitive approaches. [-]

Master in Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age

Campus Full time August 2017 Finland Helsinki

This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you. [+]

Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly in Finland, but its linguistic relatives are scattered over a larger area? How can you study a language that does not have a standard orthography? Why can you sometimes tell where other people come from just by their accent? Why do some people stick to their dialect, but others give it up when they move to the city? Should you try to support language diversity? Can we save languages that are spoken by a very small number of people? How can computer-synthesised speech be made to sound more human? Why do some languages seem so much more difficult to learn - are they inherently more complex? This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you. During your studies, you will: gain an in-depth understanding of the basic structure of language, its subsystems (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) and their mutual relationships learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis and language description familiarize yourself with linguistic concepts, theories, descriptive models and the associated research methods learn how language is related to cognition, speech and interaction as well as to social structures, culture and society learn to use various methods and technical tools in order to manage and analyze language data. gain a good understanding of linguistic variation and diversity: what is common to the world's languages and how they differ, how language changes through time, how languages influence one another, how individuals cope with multilingual situations and how communities speaking endangered languages can be supported. After completing your studies, you will be able to work independently in various fields that require multidisciplinary expertise in linguistic sciences. You will have the theoretical knowledge and skills that are required for postgraduate studies in the doctoral programme in language studies. The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee is 13 000 EUR. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check the FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees. In­form­a­tion on the lan­guages of in­struc­tion The language of instruction is English. Pro­gramme con­tents Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age is an integrated international programme that offers you a comprehensive view of all subfields of the science of language. As a student in the programme you will be able to choose among four specialist options: (1) General Linguistics, (2) Phonetics, (3) Language Technology, and (4) Diversity Linguistics. General Linguistics gives you comprehensive in-depth training in a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language structure and language in use. Special emphasis is put on language typology in a global perspective as well as the documentation and description of endangered and previously undocumented and under-documented forms of speech. Phonetics will introduce you to the tools for working with the articulatory, acoustic and perceptional aspects of human speech from a multidisciplinary perspective. At the more advanced level, you will become acquainted with the methods of experimental phonetics. Language Technology combines linguistics with digital technology in an interdisciplinary approach with close links to computer science. The focus areas include natural language processing (NLP) for morphologically rich languages, cross-lingual NLP and language technology in the humanities. Diversity Linguistics encompasses all aspects of linguistic diversity in time and space, including historical linguistics as well as the extralinguistic context of languages: ethnicities, cultures and environ­ments. The areal foci in Diversity Linguistics are Eurasia and Africa. These four specialist options interact at all levels. There is a study module common to all students in the programme regardless of the specialist option they choose. The integration of these four perspectives into one programme is unique - no similar programme exists anywhere else. In the context of “Humanities”, the programme has the closest relationship to natural sciences, and many subfields of the programme involve methods directly linked to laboratory sciences, including digital technology and neurosciences. The teaching in the programme includes lectures and seminars, practical exercise sessions, reading circles, fieldwork excursions, as well as work practice (internship). The broad spectrum of teaching methods guarantees optimal support for your learning processes. Se­lec­tion of the ma­jor The MA programme Linguistic diversity in the Digital Age includes four specialist options. After completing the module common to all students in the programme, you will choose one of them, but in your elective studies you can include courses from the other specialist options as well as from other MA programmes. General linguistics General linguistics in Helsinki supports a broad range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language. Our focus is on language description and typology in a global perspective. In language description, we emphasise the documentation and grammatical description of endangered and previously under-documented languages. Typological research examines patterns of cross-linguistic variation in order to understand the general regularities governing the structure and functioning of human language. Phonetics Phonetics is the science of speech. Speech can be investigated as a motor-cognitive ability or skill, as an acoustic signal, or as a perceptual phenomenon. The training as a phonetician involves a broad range of fields, both applied and research-oriented. Phonetic research itself is often multidisciplinary and combines general phonetics, e.g., with speech technology, acoustics, linguistics, language technology, language education, psychology and neuroscience. Language technology Technological innovations of recent years have had an important impact on the study of language. Language technology offers technical tools and methods with which natural language ‑ speech and writing ‑ is processed by a computer. Some well-known applications of language technology are automatic spelling and grammar checking, speech recognition, speech synthesis, and machine translation. Diversity linguistics Diversity linguistics investigates the diversity of human language by looking at languages and speaker communities through time and space. Like general linguists, diversity linguists are interested in the complexity of human language, and they use similar typological and descriptive approaches. A specific feature of diversity linguistics is that it combines language description with historical-comparative linguistics, linguistic anthropology, sociolinguistics and cultural history. This enables students to describe the language history of a given region or society, and to analyse a language grammatically. It fosters understanding of linguistic diversity and its maintenance under various ecological conditions. Pro­gramme struc­ture The scope of the Master of Arts degree is 120 credits. The degree contains the following studies: studies common to all students in the programme (30 credits) advanced studies in the specialist option (at least 60 credits) other studies (up to 30 credits) The target duration of full-time studies leading to an MA degree is two years. All students in the programme take the same courses during the autumn semester of the first year. Then you will focus on your specialist option (general linguistics, phonetics, language technology, or diversity linguistics). This block of studies consists of courses (at least 30 credits) and of the final project, which is your Master's thesis (30 credits). Additionally, you choose other studies: modules offered either by the other specialist options within this Master's programme or by other programmes within the University of Helsinki. The size of such optional study modules is typically 15, 25 or 30 credits. Courses offered by other universities can also be included here. The studies in your own specialist option as well as the other studies may also include an internationalization period (e.g. student exchange) and work practice or other working life oriented study units. Working life and career development perspectives are integrated in many courses in the programme. You will complete your studies systematically. At the beginning of your Master’s studies, you will prepare your first personal study plan (PSP). In this, you will receive support especially from the staff of the Master's programme. Guidance is also given at the Faculty level. Thesis Master’s studies culminate in the writing of the Master’s thesis, an independent scientific study with the scope of 30 credits. You will be guided through the writing process in the thesis seminar in the second year of your studies. The aim of the Master’s thesis is to develop basic skills required for conducting research. The most important of them include the ability to seek information independently, to analyse and assess existing information critically, and to produce and apply information independently. In addition, the writing of the Master’s thesis develops project management skills and the mastery of extensive knowledge. As a rule, the thesis is written in English (but students with Finnish or Swedish as their administrational language can write their thesis in these languages). After completing your Master’s thesis, you will be ready to work in a persevering manner and able to understand large wholes, have the ability to define and discuss the chosen research problem, master the theories and research methods required in your own work, have demonstrated familiarity with the topic of the thesis and the literature in the field, and be able to communicate scientifically and analyse material. Ca­reer pro­spects After graduation, students of the programme find employment in a wide variety of positions, in which special knowledge of language is required. One path prepares you for a research career, and many graduates work as researchers in Finland and abroad. You can also work in the political, diplomatic, and educational sectors, as well as research administration. Further potential employers are found in the publishing industry, media and journalism, public relations and communications of business and public administration, as well as NGOs. If you choose a technological orientation, you may work in language technology firms or more generally in the IT sector. Big international companies are in constant need of experts in speech and language technology. Additionally, there is a vibrant field of domestic companies, some established ones and many promising start-ups. Some students have founded their own companies and become entrepreneurs. Note that it is not possible to graduate as a (subject) teacher in the LingDA Master's programme. In honour of the University of Helsinki's 375th anniversary, the Faculty of Arts presented 375 humanists during year 2015. Get to know the humanists: http://375humanistia.helsinki.fi! In­ter­na­tion­al­iz­a­tion Linguistics is by definition an international field. Language capacity is a feature common to all human beings, and the objective of linguistics as a science is to study both the universal background of language as a phenomenon and the global diversity of languages as expressions of social and cultural heritage. In the LingDA programme, internationalization is present in several forms and at several levels: The programme functions in English and accepts international students from all countries; The programme recruits students representing a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds; The students are encouraged to study and master many languages from both the practical and the theoretical points of view; The students are encouraged early on to get engaged in documentational and typological field work among speakers of little documented languages in various parts of the world; The students are encouraged to use the opportunities of international exchange that the university offers. The programme has a high international profile and all teachers have wide international contact networks. At the university of Helsinki, linguistics was internationalized as early as the 19th century. Finland is a country where, in particular, ethnolinguistics and field linguistics were developed and practised much earlier than in most other European countries. Some of the regions where Finnish ethnolinguists have been active include North and Central Eurasia, the Near and Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, and Africa. This tradition of field-work-oriented linguistics is today carried on by the HALS (Helsinki Area and Linguistic Studies) research community. At the same time, the more recent fields of linguistics, including phonetics, language technology, and typology, have developed their own international profiles. Net­work­ing The programme has active contacts with other language-related study programmes within the university. Courses or modules in Computer Science are suggested for the technically oriented students. Via JOO agreements, students may also take suitable courses in other universities, e.g., Speech and Language Processing at Aalto University. Members of the teaching staff are well connected with linguistics and language technology programmes in other Nordic and European universities as well as worldwide. It is also possible to attend summer schools organized by other linguistic programmes in Europe, given that these studies have been accepted in advance. Some courses in linguistic corpus methods and language data management are offered by or in co-operation with the FIN-CLARIN consortium, whose national coordinator and support team are located at the University of Helsinki. FIN-CLARIN provides resources and services for language researchers through Kielipankki, the Language Bank of Finland, maintained by CSC - IT Center for Science. FIN-CLARIN is part of the European research infrastructure called CLARIN ERIC. Especially the language technology side of the programme has close cooperation with technology companies and other businesses. Furthermore, the teachers and students of the programme interact widely with other societal actors, both public sector and NGOs. Re­search fo­cus The MA programme Diversity Linguistics in the Digital Age combines several research fields in which the University of Helsinki has long been a global leader. Language research in Helsinki has always maintained its strong commitment to a better understanding of cultural areas and their history. Situated in an ideal place for the study of language history and contact linguistics of various Eurasian language families, the study of Uralic languages has a long tradition in Helsinki. Our interest in the culturally and historically informed study of language reaches well beyond that, though, spanning Asia, Europe and Africa. Our language research is empirically driven and informed by linguistic typology. The question of linguistic complexity, its significance for language and cultural history, and its intersection with ecological models is a hallmark of the Helsinki School of Linguistics. We explore new horizons in area and language studies by combining cutting edge research in linguistic typology with field work based descriptive linguistics and linguistic anthropology. A unique asset at the University of Helsinki is the presence of various language technology initiatives at the forefront of the digital humanities. The study of morphologically complex languages plays a great role here, and special attention is paid to lesser researched languages. Each of the four study lines of our MA programme thus corresponds to a University of Helsinki focus area. Our language-related research is typically multidisciplinary and involves more than one linguistic specialty. This is also a crucial feature in our MA programme. Students receive theoretical, thematic and methodological training for research or other professional careers that require problem-solving skills in order to maintain linguistic diversity and to support people’s linguistic well-being. [-]

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