Master's Program in Fine Arts in Dublin Ireland

Top Masters Degrees in Fine Arts in Dublin Ireland

Fine Arts

In order to successfully obtain a Masters qualification, you will need to obtain a number of credits by passing individual modules. Most taught Masters will have a number of core modules which you must take and pass in order to obtain the qualification. The assessment of research Masters is almost always entirely by a single dissertation module or project.

A fine arts program offers students the opportunity to study a wide variety of different art mediums. Examples of classes are color theory, 2-D design, animation, 3-D design, printmaking, music theory, computer applications and web design.

Ireland lately implemented a law, which mandates all students attending university education to apply for government loans to allow them achieve their higher academic dreams. First official language is Irish, also known as Irish Gaelic, but English (the second official language) is more widely used. The national capital is Dublin. Ireland is famous for celebrating Saint Patrick’s Day (17 March) all over the world.

Dublin, which is from Leinster province, is a modern center of educational institutions that are famous for quality education. This city has great cultural importance. It offers three major universities to education seekers: The University of Dublin, The National University of Ireland and Dublin City University.

Best Masters Degree in Fine Arts in Dublin in Ireland

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Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Creative Writing

American College Dublin
Campus Full time September 2017 Ireland Dublin

Based in the childhood home of Oscar Wilde at 1 Merrion Square and delivered in association with the Irish Writers’ Centre, the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Creative Writing offers aspiring or published writers a one-year course of study which examines the process and practice of producing prose fiction. [+]

Master Degrees in Fine Arts in Dublin Ireland. Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Creative Writing Based in the childhood home of Oscar Wilde at 1 Merrion Square and delivered in association with the Irish Writers’ Centre, the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Creative Writing offers aspiring or published writers a one-year course of study which examines the process and practice of producing prose fiction. The work of the last two years’ classes has included pieces that were shortlisted for the Penguin Ireland Short Story Competition, twice longlisted for the Fish Short Story Competition, and two students who were selected as finalists in the IWC Novel Fair. Within a critical workshop and mentoring format students are provided with tuition and advice in completing either a novel or a short story collection. Consideration is given to the intellectual, psychological, economic and cultural influences that underpin and drive the creative writing process. The course also emphasizes the business and professional environment of writing, with seminars presented by agents and publishers and master classes by established writers. The programme provides the student both with expert guidance in producing a substantial written work of publishable standard, and with a comprehensive understanding of the theoretical and practical requirements of successful participation in the activity of writing, whether as a professional career or as part of a lifelong personal commitment to creative endeavour. A graduate of the programme will be in a position to consider submission of a complete and polished work to a literary agent or publisher. He or she will also be prepared for participation in a range of complementary fields such as journalism, publishing, editing, online writing, advertising, marketing and teaching. The degree develops a broad spectrum of transferable skills, including advanced and adaptable writing techniques, informed responsiveness to critical and editorial commentary, self-management and organizational competencies, and a high level of expertise in understanding and locating creative work within a historical and critical context. These skills are applicable not only in careers that draw directly on the ability to write creatively, but also in a wide array of related business, cultural and social activities such as keeping a web page, blogging, advocacy and grant writing, criticism and commentary. Finally, the degree highlights the beauty and, amid such suffering as is necessary, the joy of creative expression. Regardless of the particular path a graduate follows, he or she will leave the programme with an enhanced, lifelong appreciation of the manifold intellectual and emotional benefits and consolations to be found in the practice of creative writing. Sean O’Reilly Sean O’Reilly teaches the novel workshop and the module on the craft of creative writing on the MFA in Creative Writing. Sean O’ Reilly grew up in Derry, Northern Ireland. His work includes the short story collection, Curfew, and the novels Love and Sleep and The Swing of Things and the experimental erotic novella, Watermark. He is a contributing editor to the literary magazine, The Stinging Fly. Mike McCormack Mike McCormack teaches the short story workshop on the MFA in Creative Writing. Born in 1965, Mike McCormack comes from the west of Ireland. He is the author of one collection of short stories, Getting it in the Head (1996), and two novels, Crowe’s Requiem (1998) and Notes from a Coma (2005). In 1996 McCormack was awarded the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature. Getting it in the Head was chosen as New York Times Notable Book of the Year in 1998. In 2006, Notes from a Coma was shortlisted for the Irish Book of the Year Award. In 2007 he was awarded a Civitella Ranieri Fellowship. The Irish Writers’ Centre The MFA in Creative Writing is delivered in association with the Irish Writers’ Centre, based at 19 Parnell Square. The Irish Writers’ Centre has long been a hub of literary activity in Dublin, supporting established and aspiring writers throughout Ireland from its location in what Joyce called 'the heart of the Hibernian metropolis.' It is a non-profit organisation, aimed at promoting literature and writers in Ireland. Since it was founded in 1987, the Irish Writers’ Centre has welcomed many award winning writers through its doors, including Nobel, Costa, Man Booker, IMPAC, and Pulitzer Prize winners. It has also served as an important platform for breakthrough talent, with many young writers giving their first public readings at the Centre. The Irish Writers’ Centre has considerable experience and expertise in teaching and promoting creative writing. These qualities, allied with American College Dublin’s long background in liberal arts higher education, have informed the development of the programme and provide ongoing support for it. The Centre serves as a space for programme events and presentations, facilitates MFA students in establishing contacts with agents, publishers and other key figures in the publishing industry, and provides a context for students to engage and interact with the Dublin and Irish writing community. All MFA students are required to be members of the Irish Writers’ Centre during the year of their registration on the programme and are encouraged to enter into its culture and activities, both during the course and in the years beyond. Additionally, as a general principle, students are encouraged to draw on the observations and other writerly enjoyments and inspirations that attend the experience of travelling the paths, by-ways and spaces that link Merrion and Parnell squares. Course Schedule The MFA in Creative Writing consists of a variety of taught classes, workshops, and a culminating final project, which is a substantial portion of a novel or a collection of short stories. All modules are mandatory, with the exception of one of the writing workshop classes in the first semester; novelists are required only to take the novel writing workshop and short story writers are only required to take the short story workshop, not both (however, though attendance in both is not mandatory, any student is wishes to participate in both is welcome to do so). The creative writing project is developed throughout the course of the programme (indeed, some students may come to the degree with work already in some stage of completion which is developed in the programme) and is completed during the summer, with a submission date in the first week of September) Semester 1 Imagination and storytelling Writing workshop 1: the novel Writing workshop 1: the short story The writer as critic The craft of creative writing Semester 2 The business of writing and publishing Writing workshop 2 Masterclass in fiction writing Creative writing project Course Requirements An honours bachelor degree in a cognate discipline may be an advantage but is not a necessity for entry to the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing. The principal requirements for admission to the programme are demonstration of a sufficient interest in the activity of creative writing and furnishing of evidence of an ability to undertake and benefit from a course of master’s level study and tuition in creative writing. An applicant for the MFA should submit to the Admissions Office a statement of approximately 750 words of his or her interest in undertaking the course and a portfolio of his or her prose writing. The portfolio may consist of a single piece of writing or of a collection of up to four samples; the entire length of the portfolio should be approximately 3000 words. The applicant will also be required to attend an interview (in person or by means of the internet). Career Skills Along with academic knowledge that students receive throughout the duration of their chosen subject, students will also acquire and develop transferable career skills from their degree discipline. These skills along with potential career paths are provided below to give you a well-rounded view of what the course has to offer. These skills include: Advanced skills and competencies in written communication Advanced skills and competences in academic research Detail-oriented Creativity Self-management Organisational competencies Critical and editorial commentary Graduates of MFA in Creative Writing will be prepared to participate in a range of complementary fields including: Journalism Publishing Editing Online writing Advertising Marketing Teaching [-]

MA in Art Research Collabouration

Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology [IADT]
Campus Full time October 2016 Ireland Dublin

The ARC MA programme is open to artists, writers and curators or those whose research focus identifies art thinking and practices as a significant component. [+]

MA in Art Research Collaboration (previously titled Visual Arts Practice) IADT is currently developing this two year taught Master of Arts Programme, titled MA Art Research Collaboration (ARC), for commencement in September 2014. This programme replaces the MA in Visual Arts Practices (2004-2014). Led by Dr. Maeve Connolly and Dr. Sinead Hogan, the new ARC MA is a research-focused taught masters programme delivered over two years, running from September to June, with a planned intake of approximately 10-12 students per year. The programme will incorporate research groups developed in collaboration with project partners such as the Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) and the Irish Film Institute (IFI). The ARC MA programme is open to artists, writers and curators or those whose research focus identifies art thinking and practices as a significant component. The course intends to support a strongly interdisciplinary enquiry into areas that through research might be related and/or be applied to art, such as philosophy, psychology, media production, film, education, history, literature, archaeology, geography, publishing, design and architecture. Modules will be taught primarily off-campus but students will also have access to art production workshops and the extended facilities on the main IADT campus. Aims and Learning Objectives What modules will I study? In year one, students complete a series of taught modules, participating in tutorials and critiques designed to support the development of their chosen research projects, and also work in small groups toward the realization of public-oriented projects. In year two, they can either work independently, supported by regular meetings, or as part of the research groups developed in collaboration with IMMA and IFI. What are the entry requirements? The MA Art Research Collaboration is open to recent graduates from any discipline area whose current research focus has identified art thinking and practices as a significant component and those with an established track record of art research and/or practice. Applicants must demonstrate an informed engagement with art research, and identify a potential area for further study by submitting either: 1. A Project Proposal consisting of 4 x A4 pages comprising plans and images of a proposed project of practice-based work and explanatory text, if the research is envisaged as being delivered primarily through practice-led enquiry. If the project involves the production of artworks, applicants must also submit documentation of previous artwork (max. 10 images, on DVD or USB flash drive/memory stick). If the practice involves the production of written texts, applicants must also submit samples of previous writing. OR 2. A Project Proposal of 3000 words, if the project research is envisaged as being delivered primarily through theory and written textual enquiry. All Project Proposals should include the following elements: - Outline of the main concerns or questions to be explored in your proposed project (which could result in the production of artworks, publications and/or the organisation of screenings,exhibitions, discussions, research texts and/or events) - Discussion of any aspects of your previous experience of art practice and/or research relevant to your project. - Exploration of the context for your project, including strategies and approaches developed by other practitioners and/or researchers, within and/or beyond the art field. - Potential collaborators on your project, such as art practitioners (artists, writers, curators),researchers and/or organisations and institutions within or beyond the art field. - List of research sources (such as publications) most relevant to your project (max 10). [-]