Masters Degree in the Stirling in the United Kingdom

Best Master's Programs in the Stirling in the United Kingdom 2017

Master

The benefits of a Masters extend beyond improving your earning potential. They can provide you with personal and professional skills to accelerate your development. They are also an opportunity to differentiate yourself from your peers, many of whom will have similar A-level and undergraduate qualifications.

Earning a Master requires two years of education after earning a Bachelor. This advanced degree may help students to achieve their educational and professional goals, as the rigors of a Master’s program help train students in the skills and knowledge they need to land the career of their dreams.

 

UK, United Kingdom is more than 300 years old and comprises four constituent nations: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The UK has been a centre of learning for the past 1,000 years and possesses many ancient and distinguished universities. Foreign students make up a significant proportion of the student body at UK universities.

Stirling was historically one of the royal strongholds of the Kingdom of Scotland. Now it’s home to The University of Stirling that has between 11 and 12 thousand students, representing over 80 nationalities.

Masters Degrees in the Stirling in the United Kingdom

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MRes in Translation Studies

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27  September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

A postgraduate degree in Translation Studies is of the highest value. Not only will it equip you with professional level translation skills in international dialogues, enabling you to play your part in developing a global community, it will also give you an opportunity to fine-tune your communication skills and awareness of the wide range of challenges and opportunities that arise every time intercultural dialogue occurs. [+]

Top Masters Programs in the Stirling in the United Kingdom. Available in six languages pairings, one of which must be your native language: English and one of French, German, Mandarin, Polish, Russian and Spanish. A postgraduate degree in Translation Studies is of the highest value. Not only will it equip you with professional level translation skills in international dialogues, enabling you to play your part in developing a global community, it will also give you an opportunity to fine-tune your communication skills and awareness of the wide range of challenges and opportunities that arise every time intercultural dialogue occurs. Recent research has shown that the fall in the number of language learners over the past decade has come at a big cost to the UK economy. While we may be able to continue to trade and to develop partnerships with countries, regions and companies whose first language is English, we’ve been cutting ourselves off from large swathes of the new markets emerging in East Asia, in Latin America, and in West Africa, to name but three regions. This trend has had an impact even at EU level, according to a recent CFA Skills report. The reasons for this recent decline in language learning are varied, but the tide is turning as Scottish and UK business and industry recognises the benefits of speaking the languages of truly global trade. Accreditation We are proud members of the ‌. The ITI is the UK's only dedicated association for practising translation and interpreting professionals. Our membership of the ITI allows us to help you to keep abreast of the full range of exciting developments and opportunities in the languages services industry. Course objectives The Master’s in Translation Studies has a strong focus on practical translation and on specific situations in which people communicate with one another across different cultures. We offer the following languages: Chinese, French, German, Polish, Russian and Spanish (available subject to demand and availability). The course provides extensive practical translation work on a theme or topic of your choice. It is structured so that you can have considerable flexibility in choosing what areas of translation you wish to specialise in, as you build up a portfolio of translations with your tutor. You may also choose to undertake an extended translation as part of your final dissertation and will be given an opportunity to examine some of the key topics in contemporary Translation Studies. Students on the course examine some major debates surrounding the opportunities and problems that arise when people from different cultures communicate and translate, through seminars led by experts in the field of intercultural communication. There will also be some opportunity for work-based study and exercises, as well as a chance to develop your skills using translation software packages. If you wish to study for a PhD subsequently, you have the opportunity to demonstrate you have attained a level that prepares you for a higher research degree. And for candidates of a suitable level, there is an opportunity to continue in Stirling with a practice-led doctorate involving translation. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Language competence requirement; a native speaker of or holding a degree in French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Russian or Polish. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding A variety of scholarships and bursaries may be available in any given year, including scholarships in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content Stirling’s MRes in Translation Studies has all the taught elements of an MSc course, while still retaining the flexibility of research-led learning and teaching. This established course has a number of features which will enhance your learning experience. The teaching year follows the two semesters, which run from mid-September to late December, and from January to the end of May. During the summer, students complete a dissertation. Portfolio of Translation: This module develops critical ability and autonomy in applying theories and approaches to different types of translation texts. It will also introduce students to the core translation theories, research methods and approaches in Translation Studies. After that, the students will develop, with their tutor, their own portfolio of practical translation exercises, relating to their own interests. The portfolio will consist of four pieces of translation, each approx. 500 words in length. Students will also discuss and comment on the issues arising in translating your portfolio in a commentary of around 1,250 words. Cultural Translation and Transfer: This module naturally features literary translation, but it also considers cultural translation more broadly. You will engage in seminar discussions with experts, analysing the opportunities and problems that arise when information is communicated across cultures in a variety of settings. You will be assessed by means of essays reflecting on a major topic of debate, as well as a report based on a site visit to one of our partner institutions engaged in cultural translation. Terminology and Translation Project Management: This module focuses on introducing students to the theoretical framework of the disciplines of terminology and project management, familiarising them with the practice of terminological research and glossary compilation - both essential adjuncts to the work of a professional translator - and developing the students’ career awareness and enterprise skills. Specialised Translation: The half-module addresses the significant and growing demand for specialised translation within human situations and professional contexts, across different degrees of specialisation in a range of subject matters, including business, legaltechnical, audiovisual, journalistic and PR texts either from two languages into English or one language into and out of English, at a professional level. It is offered in combination with Translation and Computer Technology. Translation with Computer Technology: This half-module trains students to apply their theoretical and conceptual background to a practical approach to translation and to address the significant and growing demand for basic skills in translation studies. The module will include translation corpora, terminology bank, machine translation (MT) and computer-aided translation (CAT) tools in the fields of translation memory (TM) management, translation project management, translation of documentation, and software localisation, to exploiting translation resources available on the internet and legacy translation data. Research Skills: Our innovative Arts Graduate Training modules enable students to build up a portfolio of skills that prepare them for academic and professional life. All graduate students will work with their supervisors to select what’s right for them from a menu of activities. For many of our students a key part of these modules involves participating in work placements and work experience with local businesses, museums and film festivals. Dissertation Subject to successful completion of all elements of the assessment in both Semesters, you will choose one of the following as your dissertation project: an extended piece of translation and related research and commentary based on it a ‘traditional’ dissertation on a topic drawn from Translation Theories a ‘traditional’ dissertation focusing on a topic drawn from the field of Cultural Translation You are expected to begin collating materials during the Spring. The main writing period will follow on from the end of teaching in May, and all dissertations are submitted at the end of August. Delivery and assessment You will attend seminars and workshop sessions which will focus on translation theories, cultural translation and transfer, but also on the practical activity of translation. One of the modules in the autumn semester will also feature a site visit to one of our partner institutions which engages in cultural translation, broadly construed. Assessment will include essays, reports (which may take the form of written documents, websites or PowerPoint presentations), the portfolio of translation, and the dissertation. Modes of study You will attend seminars and workshop sessions which will focus on translation theories, cultural translation and transfer, but also on the practical activity of translation. One of the modules in the autumn semester will also feature a site visit to one of our partner institutions which engages in cultural translation, broadly construed. Assessment will include essays, reports (which may take the form of written documents, websites or PowerPoint presentations), the portfolio of translation, and the dissertation. Strengths The MRes Translation Studies is accredited by the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI), meaning it is professionally recognised throughout the world. In addition to offering valuable training in translation practice, the MRes is also a particularly appropriate qualification for those intending to pursue subsequent doctoral and/or practice-led research. You are taught by staff with a strong background in the teaching of language and Translation Studies, and of translation itself. ​ Career opportunities Our taught MRes in Translation Studies is, first and foremost, a fantastic gateway into a career in Translation, whether you want to work freelance or in-house, and there’s much more that you could end up doing with a qualification in Translation. In a world of globalisation, criss-crossing travel and trade routes, and multi-lingual, multi-platform media, your translation skills will set you apart from the crowd. Whether you’re interested in developing a career overseas, or working for one of the many international companies with offices in Scotland and the UK, or playing your part in the ever-expanding global economy, this is the course for you. Here in Scotland, exports increased by £1.6 billion over the course of 2010 according to the latest Global Connections Survey (2013) and the upward trend looks set to continue. For organisations such as Scottish Enterprise, up and coming translators who can expand Scotland’s business partners and look towards new horizons are extremely highly valued. And our course's six, in-demand languages (French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Polish and Russian) are indicators of some of these new horizons towards which the country is turning with an increase of more than 14% in exports to the EU, strong growth in emerging Asian markets, and a marked interest in new, innovative areas such as renewables. And wherever Scottish businesses seek to expand their marketplace, they call on translators to help smooth the path. Industry connections Our translation course has developed industry links with the translation profession through: ITI Chartered Institute of Linguists, National Network for Translation National Network for Interpreting Professional Language University Group [-]

MRes in Renaissance Studies

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27  September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MRes Renaissance Studies is aimed at those who are interested in the literary and broader cultural aspects of the Renaissance and who wish to acquire a more specialised knowledge of this field. A primary objective is to investigate factors that contribute to the distinctiveness of the cultural productions of Northern Europe, including Scotland. [+]

Suspended for 2016/17 entry The MRes Renaissance Studies is aimed at those who are interested in the literary and broader cultural aspects of the Renaissance and who wish to acquire a more specialised knowledge of this field. A primary objective is to investigate factors that contribute to the distinctiveness of the cultural productions of Northern Europe, including Scotland. Course objectives The research-based MRes course aims to: Introduce you to key areas of critical debate in Renaissance Studies by comparing different canonical accounts of the period Explore the distinctiveness of northern Renaissance culture, including Scotland. Develop a critical understanding of the variety of genres, media and signifying practices employed by Renaissance writers and visual artists Equip you with the technical skills necessary for conducting research in this field, presenting information and constructing scholarly arguments What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. A sample of work (e.g. English Essay) is required. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The core of this MRes course is a sustained period of independent study, assessed by coursework over two semesters. This involves a course of directed reading and research, to be agreed by each individual student with his/her supervisor, and tailored to his/her interests. In addition, students take two taught modules from a menu including: Politics and Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Renaissance Sovereignty: Politics and Representation Writing and National Identity Please note that not all these optional modules may be offered in each academic year. Arts Research Training Our innovative training for graduates enables students to build up a portfolio of skills that prepare them for academic and professional life. All graduate students will work with their supervisors to select what’s right for them from a menu of activities. Each student will build up a portfolio of skills every year. On a taught postgraduate degree, you may be given specific guidance on what activities you need to undertake for those qualifications. Dissertation The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words on a subject of your choosing in consultation with a member of English Studies. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. Career opportunities Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Advanced education in the Arts and the practical experience of research and the production of a dissertation are significant transferable skills for many careers. [-]

MLitt in Publishing Studies

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27  September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MLitt in Publishing Studies teaching course is devised, and continually updated, to reflect current publishing industry practice and standards. It produces graduates who will have an enhanced opportunity to succeed in publishing and publishing-related careers. The course is demanding, stimulating and enjoyable, and many publishers now consider it to be the equivalent of a year’s experience within a publishing company. Our graduates occupy senior positions in both commercial and not-for-profit publication organisations throughout the world. [+]

Top Masters Programs in the Stirling in the United Kingdom. The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication provides a comprehensive and coherent approach to all forms of publishing. The course covers the whole process of planning, editing, production, marketing and publication management in print and digital environments. It is dedicated to teaching the best current publishing practice, so the detailed content is updated each year as a result of the rapid changes that are transforming the industry worldwide. The MLitt in Publishing Studies teaching course is devised, and continually updated, to reflect current publishing industry practice and standards. It produces graduates who will have an enhanced opportunity to succeed in publishing and publishing-related careers. The course is demanding, stimulating and enjoyable, and many publishers now consider it to be the equivalent of a year’s experience within a publishing company. Our graduates occupy senior positions in both commercial and not-for-profit publication organisations throughout the world. The MLitt in Publishing offers: Strong publishing industry links and networks Enhanced publishing career pathways International environment with a student cohort from all around the world Intensive publishing research environment Course objectives In close contact with publishing businesses and the changing needs of the industry worldwide, the teaching team equips you with the qualities — intellectual and prac What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The MLitt in Publishing Studies is a one-year, full-time course (two years, part-time) designed to enable students' career development in Publishing. In Semester 1, students take compulsory modules in Publishing Dynamics, Editorial Practice and Content Creation, Marketing Management and Communications, Skills Training for Publishing, and the Publishing Project. These modules offer a coherent introduction to the publishing and related industries, offering students a thorough grounding in contemporary publishing. Part-time students take the course over two years. As well as the content of the modules, students attend a regular series of Visiting Speakers, have the opportunity to attend industry events such as the Publishing Scotland conference and the London Book Fair, go on field trips to locations including a printer and a book distributor, and to undertake a variety of internships and work placements. Delivery and assessment The MLitt in Publishing Studies is delivered through interactive lectures, seminars, workshops (including sessions in the Publishing Computer Lab) and one-to-one teaching. Assessment is based on a range of practical and academic activities, including the creation of a physical publishing product (a book, magazine, e-book or app), marketing plans, presentations, and a dissertation. Students have opportunities to undertake work experience and internships, and to go on industry visits and field trips. There is also a weekly series of visiting speakers. Strengths The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication was established in 1982 and has since developed a global reputation for its postgraduate degrees in publishing, its research activities, and its industry links. Focusing on book, magazine, journal and digital publishing, the Centre trains the publishers of the future, provides opportunities for those currently working in the industry to reflect on their professional practice, and through its research, critically analyses the past, present and future of the publishing. The Centre undertakes a range of staff and student research activities, including collaborations with industry, publishing-related organisations and other Universities. We focus on the history of the book and publishing studies in the 20th and 21st centuries, both in Scotland, the UK and globally, including digital publishing, graphic novels and games, contemporary literary publishing, children’s publishing literary awards and book festivals. Our work has been funded by a number of funders including the AHRC, RSE, British Council, Nesta, and Creative Scotland, working with partners including Glasgow Life, the Saltire Society and Publishing Scotland. Career opportunities The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication has over 30 years of graduates now working in the publishing and related industries. Entry level jobs our students have gone into in recent years include: Publicity Assistant, Canongate Publicity Assistant, Faber & Faber Marketing Assistant, Taylor & Francis Events & Marketing Assistant, The Bookseller Sales & Marketing Assistant, McGraw Hill Production Assistant, Oxford University Press Editorial Assistant, Oxford University Press Production Editor, Cicerone Press Publishing Assistant, Cengage Learning Web editor, Digital Publishing Department, China Social Sciences Press Foreign Rights Specialist, Suncolor Publishing Group Web Editor, BooksfromScotland.com Some of our alumni who have worked in the publishing industry have gone onto the following job roles: Group Sales Director and President (Asia Region), Taylor & Francis Chief Executive, Publishing Scotland Managing Editor, Little Island Books Higher Education Texts and eBook Sales Manager, Taylor and Francis (Asia Pacific) Director, World Book Day Production Editor, Taylor & Francis Founder and Publisher, Tapsalteerie and Lumphanan Press Employability The MLitt in Publishing Studies is built around developing and enhancing publishing careers for its students. The focus of the modules is on building skills and understanding of the contemporary publishing industry, with constantly updated content and access to industry expertise. All students have the opportunity to undertake work placements, with host organisations in recent years including: Alban Books Barrington Stoke Bloody Scotland International Crime Writing Festival Canongate Books Fledgling Press Floris Books Freight Books HarperCollins Luath Press Octopus Books Oxford University Press Saraband Books Tern Digital Industry connections The Centre is supported by an Industry Advisory Board, with members from Floris Books, Freight Books, Publishing Scotland, Oxford University Press and Taylor & Francis. Further industry support is provided by our regular visiting speaker series, and the internships and work placements provided for our students. The Centre is a Network Member of Publishing Scotland. [-]

MPP in Public Policy

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time August 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The Master’s in Public Policy (MPP) provides an advanced qualification in research and policy analysis. It allows you to develop the conceptual, analytical and practical skills required to flourish in the policymaking world, preparing you for a career in the public sector and vocations that make a contribution to the development or delivery of public policy. [+]

The Master’s in Public Policy (MPP) provides an advanced qualification in research and policy analysis. It allows you to develop the conceptual, analytical and practical skills required to flourish in the policymaking world, preparing you for a career in the public sector and vocations that make a contribution to the development or delivery of public policy. The course can also be used as a springboard for further postgraduate research and combines core modules in policy and policy-making with optional modules in social research and policy-relevant disciplines. If you want to use the degree to pursue research, to PhD level for example, you can take three modules in Applied Social Research. If you want to pursue an interest in other policy-relevant disciplines, you can combine a focus on policy and research with options in areas such as: law economics behavioural science social marketing energy environmental and international politics The course is designed to meet your specific, individual requirements and the course is delivered by small weekly group seminars, with dedicated contact with the course leader. You complete the course by producing a dissertation which applies intellectual rigour to a real world policy problem to equip the policymakers of the future. Additionally, there is some scope to take modules from the new MSc in Gender Studies. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. If you are interested in applying for the course please contact Professor Paul Cairney in the first instance - p.a.cairney@stir.ac.uk. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The course (of 180 credits) combines core modules on Policy Theory and Practice with optional modules in Social Research and policy-relevant disciplines. Its core modules (45 credits) focus on multi-level policymaking, identifying the responsibilities and policies of local, devolved, national and international decision-makers. We then identify the concepts, models and theories used to study policy and policymaking, comparing theories in political science with a range of policy-relevant disciplines (including economics, communication, psychology, management and social marketing). We also combine theory and practice by inviting a range of policy actors to give guest seminars as part of the core modules. You can choose up to five 15-credit modules in Applied Social Research (ASR), including Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, Research Design and the Philosophy of Science. You can choose two 15-credit modules in law, economics, behavioural science, social marketing, gender studies, energy, environmental and international politics. If appropriate, you can also choose to replace some ASR modules with research methods modules in your chosen subject (such as the Gender Studies course ‘Feminist Research’ which is a prerequisite for its Research Placement module). The norm is to maintain a generally high level of contact between students engaged in the MPP and a small cohort of staff (teaching core and common ASR courses), but with the flexibility to take your own path. You complete the course by producing a 60-credit dissertation (around 12,000 words) which applies intellectual rigour to a real world policy problem. You will have the option to pursue a placement with a relevant organisation to allow you to tailor your research to a policymaker or policy influencer audience. Delivery and assessment The core modules are delivered in weekly seminars and the assessment is one piece of coursework. The 15-credit module titled ‘How Does the Policy Process Work’ includes a two-hour seminar per week and 3,000 word report. The 30-credit ‘Policymaking: Theories and Approaches’ has two two-hour seminars per week (combining weekly political science theory discussions with weekly guest seminars from practitioners and other policy-relevant disciplines) and a 5,000-word report. Most ASR modules are delivered in a series of half-day, one-day or three-day blocks and involve coursework from 3,000-4,000 words. Most policy-relevant options follow the core module format of the core modules – weekly seminars and one piece of coursework. Modes of study Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in seminars, computer-based workshops and group work. Students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis, group project reports and the research dissertation. There are no examinations. Strengths We have built up a wide range of connections with organisations in the public, private and third sectors. These can be used not only to pursue your placement-based coursework but also build your own personal networks. Academic strengths The course is run by Professor Paul Cairney, a specialist in public policy research. Paul will run both core modules, coordinate course choices and supervise the dissertations most relevant to his field. The Applied Social Research component is provided by the Faculty of Social Science, which is an ESRC-recognised postgraduate research training centre. 95 percent of its research was deemed ‘internationally excellent’ in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise and it received the highest possible score in the most recent teaching quality exercise. Career opportunities The course combines subject-specific knowledge of the policy process with transferable skills in research and analysis. These are the skills required to flourish in a range of organisations in the public, private and third sectors. It prepares students for a career in the public sector and vocations that make a contribution to the development or delivery of public policy. It is also flexible enough to allow students to continue their postgraduate studies. Although the MPP is new, it builds on successful courses taught by the Faculty of Social Sciences. Over the past five years, over half of the graduates from the MSc Applied Social Research course have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors, including a manager commissioning research for a local authority, a research fellow at a university and a senior research executive for a European-wide commercial research organisation. Over one-third of its graduates continues with academic study and undertake a PhD. Employability The course combines subject-specific knowledge of the policy process with transferable skills in research and analysis. These are the skills required to flourish in a range of organisations in the public, private and third sectors. It prepares students for a career in the public sector and vocations that make a contribution to the development or delivery of public policy. It is also flexible enough to allow students to continue their postgraduate studies. Although the MPP is new, it builds on successful courses provided by the Faculty of Social Sciences. Over the past five years, over half of the graduates from the MSc Applied Social Research have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors, including a manager commissioning research for a local authority, a research fellow at a university and a senior research executive for a European-wide commercial research organisation. Over one-third of its graduates continues with academic study and undertake a PhD. [-]

MLitt in Philosophy

University of Stirling
Campus Full time September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP) is taught by the Philosophy departments in the Universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are now fully merged for all postgraduate degrees and together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy institutions in the United Kingdom. [+]

Top Masters Programs in the Stirling in the United Kingdom. The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP) is taught by the Philosophy departments in the Universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are now fully merged for all postgraduate degrees and together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy institutions in the United Kingdom. The programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers that is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects. It offers graduate teaching at a level that matches the best graduate programmes elsewhere in the world, in a wide range of areas, including the history of philosophy. Course objectives The taught MLitt provides the foundation year of the programme. Modules are offered in three fundamental areas of philosophy: logic and metaphysics, moral and political philosophy, and history of philosophy. The degree is primarily designed as a preparatory year for entry to postgraduate work in philosophy. It provides a firm foundation of general understanding and skills in philosophy which will serve as a basis for sound philosophical research. Graduate students are taught in dedicated graduate classes. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements Applicants for the MLitt should normally have a good first degree in philosophy: a UK upper second class Honours degree or its equivalent (or the equivalent level of pass in the SASP Conversion Diploma). Applicants with other qualifications may be admitted on the recommendation of the Programme Director. English language requirements All SASP courses are taught in English. Applicants who are NOT native speakers AND whose undergraduate degree was NOT taught in English must submit a recognised English Language test. We normally require a TOEFL score of 600 (paper-based). 250 (computer-based), or 100 (internet-based). A copy of your TOEFL certificate will be sufficient. Alternatively an IELTS score of 7.00 is also acceptable/sufficient. (Ideally we prefer the IELTS exam.) The University of St Andrews offers pre-sessional English courses - you can find out more about them on the website of the St Andrews University English Language Teaching Centre. If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 7.0 with minimum 6.0 in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade A Pearson Test of English (Academic): 67 with a minimum of 55 in each component IBT TOEFL: 100 with no sub test lower than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content The programme involves a one-year taught MLitt, delivered largely in St Andrews by staff from both universities, after which you may progress to a PhD within the SASP programme. The MLitt programme lasts for one year and involves six modules over two semesters and a dissertation written over the summer. The Diploma involves a nine-month, taught programme and requires satisfactory completion of all taught modules. In addition to a Research Methods module and two core modules (one in each semester) on current issues in Philosophy, the programme offers a range of options in the history of Philosophy and in special areas of philosophy. The core modules are: Current Issues in Philosophy I (first semester) and Current Issues in Philosophy II (second semester): Over the two semesters the following four components are covered by these modules (two in each semester, not necessarily in the order given): Philosophy of Mind; Philosophy of Language; Epistemology; Ethics Research Methods: You take this module in Semester 1. It provides an introduction to the methods and practice of research in philosophy. It will be run as a book seminar, where you present and discuss chapters or sections of a major work chosen to be accessible and challenging for MLitt students. The module will provide the experience of philosophising together: vital for philosophical development but liable to take second place in standard taught modules; it will also leave you better prepared to undertake larger and more autonomous research projects, beginning with the 15,000-word MLitt dissertation You are required to take a History module from a list of those available. Those recently available includes the following: Classical Philosophy Philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment Kant Origins and History of Analytic Philosophy Option modules recently available include the following: Advanced logic Philosophy of Mathematics Philosophy of Perception Aesthetics Political Philosophy Topics in Recent Moral Theory Wittgenstein Philosophy of Mind Intuitions and Philosophical Methodology Advanced Epistemology Delivery and assessment The programme is taught by seminars (normally one two-hour seminar each week for each module) and individual supervision. Assessment is normally by coursework: each full module is assessed by two essays. To gain the Diploma, you must satisfactorily complete all the taught modules. To gain the MLitt, you must satisfactorily complete the taught modules and write a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words. Career opportunities Students on the MLitt have proceeded to the further study of Philosophy at PhD level. Some have remained within the SASP Graduate Programme, either at Stirling or at St Andrews, and others have gone on to leading institutions in the UK and abroad. A large number of former MLitt students have secured permanent university teaching positions. The general training in research and analytical thinking it offers also prepares you for a wide range of careers in various areas of public policy, public administration and governance. [-]

MLitt in Modern Scottish Writing

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27  September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The Stirling Master's course views Scottish literature in the light of this ambiguity from a perspective shaped by critical theory as well as traditional literary history. Our focus is the unusually strong role played by literature in sustaining the reality and difference of Scottish culture over the past three centuries – not forgetting the role of novelists and poets in integrating Scottish identity into the project of Britishness. [+]

After more than a decade of devolution, Scotland’s national status ‘is both dangled before us and tantalisingly withheld’ (Don Paterson) The Stirling Master's course views Scottish literature in the light of this ambiguity from a perspective shaped by critical theory as well as traditional literary history. Our focus is the unusually strong role played by literature in sustaining the reality and difference of Scottish culture over the past three centuries – not forgetting the role of novelists and poets in integrating Scottish identity into the project of Britishness. As debate intensifies over Scotland’s political status, the time is ripe to examine the role of writing in shaping the image and reality of the nation. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The Autumn core modules provide a thematic and historical overview; the Spring core module explores Scottish Romantic and Modernist writing in relation to specific themes of authenticity, representation and democracy. Option modules allow students to pursue deeper knowledge of specific texts and issues. Full-time students take one option in each semester; part-time students take options in Year 2 of their course. It is now possible to study Modern Scottish Writing jointly with Creative Writing; students on this pathway do ‘critical’ modules in Modern Scottish Writing alongside Creative Writing workshops. Delivery and assessment Dissertation The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words, written during the summer on a subject of your choosing in consultation with a member of teaching staff. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction. Career opportunities Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is an increasingly common pattern of study for young scholars and is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Advanced education in the Arts, the practical experience of research and the production of a dissertation are significant transferable skills for many careers in business and the professions. Skills you can develop through this course An English degree is acknowledged by potential employers as providing important skills, such as motivation, intelligence and the ability to meet deadlines. Although English is not a specifically vocational degree it offers a number of important transferable skills, such as the ability to write clearly, effectively, accurately and persuasively. Seminar discussion and oral presentations (required by many of our modules) help to develop your spoken communication skills. The critical and reflexive study of a variety of texts (literary and non-literary) teaches you how to analyse and interpret complex information and to apply abstract concepts and theories. Our criteria for assessment also requires students to be able to synthesise conclusions, to assimilate existing research and to construct and defend an argument clearly and cogently. Throughout their degrees, our students are also trained to use library and bibliographic resources effectively and appropriately to reference accurately, and to present their work professionally. All of these skills are essential to many kinds of work, which is why so many employers recognise the value of an English Degree. In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law. Chances to expand your horizons During the semester, the department runs a number of lively literary seminars for students and staff alike, in which writers, staff members, postgraduate students and distinguished visiting scholars give papers on their work and special interests. We are fortunate in that the macrobert Arts Centre is at the centre of the University, presenting a widely varied programme of film, drama and music throughout the year. Small magazines are published on campus and the Literary Society organises visits from distinguished creative writers each year, along with theatre trips to Glasgow and Edinburgh. Finally, the University Drama Society is very active, producing about seven plays a year, including performances at the Edinburgh Festival. Where are our graduates now? In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law. Here are a few examples of the sorts of careers graduates of this course have gone on to, in recent years: Teaching and Research Assistant Doctoral research Teaching Freelance content editor Photographer Journalist Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is an increasingly common pattern of study for young scholars and is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). [-]

MRes in Media Research

University of Stirling
Campus Full time September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The Master’s degree in Media Research, which can also provide the first year of the doctoral course, is designed to give you the necessary skills to carry out advanced interdisciplinary research in the broad field of media studies. [+]

Top Masters Programs in the Stirling in the United Kingdom. Our graduate media studies Master's award, Media Research (MRes), has an illustrious background, and with our other degrees has received awards. 1st in Scotland for research in Communication, Cultural and Media Studies (most recent Research Assessment Exercise) 1st in Scotland for Communications and Media (The Independent Complete University Guide, 2011, and The Guardian University Guide, 2011) The Master’s degree in Media Research, which can also provide the first year of the doctoral course, is designed to give you the necessary skills to carry out advanced interdisciplinary research in the broad field of media studies. Course objectives A suite of MRes courses has been developed concurrently by six subject areas: Applied Social Science, Education, Communications, Media and Culture, Management, Nursing, Midwifery and Health and Sports Studies. These courses have a shared core of four modules in generic research skills, plus specialist disciplinary modules and a range of options. They combine high quality with flexibility and choice for students. Employability is another important focus, with the opportunity for a research placement offered to all MRes students. This course is designed to provide a basic but extensive training in media research methods. The training provided is multidisciplinary, covering social sciences and humanities approaches. Ideal candidates are those looking for employment in the media for which research training is seen as valuable, as well as those intending to pursue academic careers in the field. The course: Provides a structured analysis of established practices in film and media studies research Offers a critical overview of the intellectual frameworks that inform media research to enable you to develop your own approach to researching media institutions, texts and audiences Encourages you to explore your personal research interests and support the development of original enquiry through student-centred teaching and assessment What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Masters course or £1,000 for part-time study. Delivery and assessment The course involves lectures, seminars, tutorials, a research project and case study work. Assessment is by means of coursework as specified for each module and includes essays, a literature review, a research report, a seminar presentation and a media text. A dissertation proposal must be submitted by the beginning of the Spring Semester when supervisors are allocated (you will be expected to stay within the areas of current staff interest and expertise). Each dissertation is approximately 12,000 words in length and may take the form of a written publishable academic article or a project report, depending on its focus. Research interests Research interests in Communications, Media and Culture currently include: film theory and analysis; television studies; creative industries and cultural policy; media economics and regulation; digital media and activism; journalism; political communication; sport and the media; public relations; national identity and globalisation; representations of gender and ethnicity; celebrity culture; new media and intellectual property and other aspects of media and popular culture. Employability The MRes provides students with both theoretical and practical knowledge of social science research methods and an ability to apply these to the study of the media. The degree is primarily targeted at students needing research training prior to registration for a higher research degree, such as a PhD. The course also offers an excellent grounding in social science methods which are transferable to media research for industry, marketing and advertising research, production research and wider aspects of social research consultancy. Former graduates have successfully developed careers as academic researchers and a range of media industry related careers. Industry connections The Division of Communications, Media and Culture actively supports and encourages its staff to engage with a wider non-HEI audience for its research evidenced through contributions to policy fora, funded research for government agencies, collaborative work with NGO’s, engagement with the trade associations, unions and institutes of communications, media and culture professionals, active dialogue and contributions to media organisations across the spectrum of broadcasting, the press, film and the Internet, professional contributions to charities and pressure groups in relation to public media issues and policies, and a range of cultural heritage activities at national and international film festivals and exhibitions. [-]

LLM in International Energy Law and Policy

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27  September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The International Energy Law and Policy LLM at the University of Stirling has been specifically designed to address such developments. Expert staff have come together to offer an innovative and distinctive multi-disciplinary degree which will provide graduates with an in-depth understanding of energy law and policy, as well as of key areas of investment law, environmental policy, energy management and economics. [+]

The growing pressure on natural resources has prompted an evaluation of traditional forms of energy, as well as a search for new and renewable energy forms. As intersections with the environment are increasingly visible, energy production, distribution and use have become a priority area for governments, businesses and non-governmental organisations across the world. The International Energy Law and Policy LLM at the University of Stirling has been specifically designed to address such developments. Expert staff have come together to offer an innovative and distinctive multi-disciplinary degree which will provide graduates with an in-depth understanding of energy law and policy, as well as of key areas of investment law, environmental policy, energy management and economics. Our graduates will be well placed to pursue careers in: Law firms Companies Government and regulatory authorities International bodies Non-governmental organisations and charities Pressure groups, including from the environmental sector. Top Reasons To Study With Us You will acquire specialist legal knowledge in the fast-growing Energy Law and Policy sector. You will benefit from a multi-disciplinary curriculum that enables you to explore the intersections between energy, environment, investment and their regulation. You will have significant freedom in tailoring the programme to your individual needs, including through choosing your preferred optional modules. You will be taught by experienced, committed and supportive academic staff on one of the most beautiful university campuses in Europe. You will benefit from our programme’s clear and consistent focus on employability and market needs, including through the option of undertaking a work-based or work-related dissertation project. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with a 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Scottish Funding Council Masters Scholarships The Scottish Funding Council is funding Home/EU tuition fees for a number of places on this course. Funded places are open to applicants domiciled in Scotland and the EU. The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union students with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The multi-disciplinary programme consists of six taught modules which are delivered by staff specialising in Law, Politics, Economics, Management and Environmental Science (see Modules below). Students will take a combination of three modules in each semester and complete a 10,000-word dissertation over the period 1 June to the end of August. Delivery and assessment All modules are delivered by small group learning and teaching which provides an opportunity for interaction with student peers and staff which also supports the development of communication skills through discussion and presentation of key issues. Students are encouraged and expected to undertake independent study and to read widely from a variety of sources. The necessity of independent study culminates in the dissertation written in the summer. This piece of work provides students with the opportunity to produce independent research in their chosen area and showcase the acquired knowledge and skills. Modules are assessed typically by a combination of coursework and examination with the weighting varying dependent on the nature of the material taught. An integrated assessment strategy is adopted. Students must pass all six modules and achieve a passing grade in the dissertation to be awarded the Master's of Law (LLM). Strengths Graduates of the LLM in International Energy Law and Policy will be well placed to pursue careers in the legal firms, the environmental sector, government, regulatory authorities, international bodies, non-governmental organisations, business, pressure groups and charities. Expert staff within Law, Economics, Politics, and Environmental Science have come together to offer an innovative and distinctive multi-disciplinary degree which will provide graduates with developed understanding and knowledge of the key areas of environmental policy and governance. Career opportunities As climate change is increasingly regarded as the challenge of our generation, energy law and policy are amongst the most topical societal issues at the moment. Conscious of these developments, law firms are opening their own specialised Energy Law divisions. Consequently, there is a great demand for employees who have a specialised legal knowledge in energy law and policy. Graduates will significantly enhance their employability within this growing field. Other employment destinations include posts in corporate strategy and corporate management; governmental branches and public sector organisations; international organisations; specialised legal practice (for those already qualified as legal practitioners), journalism, third sector (voluntary) organisations, and NGOs. Skills you can develop through this course Excellent writing and analytical skills and communication skills Time management skills Knowledge, understanding and skills at Master's level appropriate to careers in law offices, government, international organisations, NGOs and business In-depth insights into relevant legal, political and economic issues related to energy law at national, regional and international levels An understanding of the dynamics of the past and current energy law and policy-making and governance and likely future developments in the area; The academic foundation for progression to PhD-level study Chances to expand your horizons With: opportunities to complete an industry-led collaborative research dissertation six modules over two semesters and one dissertation on a specific topic in energy law and policy (12-month course) visits to different electricity generation plants guest lectures from leading energy law and policy experts and other international experts an international student population an interdisciplinary learning approach Industry connections There are a number of international and national energy companies and top law firms that interact with our course. Many students take the opportunity to complete internships, work placements and collaborative research work with energy companies and law firms. Students develop their CV and interview skills in applying to work for these companies and gain valuable experience in collaborative projects. The LLM in International Energy Law & Policy is part of the highly successful Making-the-Most-of-Masters (www.mastersprojects.ac.uk…) programme where students have the opportunity to undertake a work-based or work related dissertation with energy companies and law firms. [-]

MSc in Information Technology

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27  August 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. It provides an opportunity for graduates of non-computing subjects to develop key specialist skills for a career in Computing. It is ideal for complementing your expertise with core computing skills. [+]

Top Masters Programs in the Stirling in the United Kingdom. The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. It provides an opportunity for graduates of non-computing subjects to develop key specialist skills for a career in Computing. It is ideal for complementing your expertise with core computing skills. Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. Students can get a first-hand industrial experience through placements and internships with local enterprises and organisations. More specifically, we offer company-based MSc projects to our students where our students can work with an employer to gain valuable commercial experience. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. We also regularly invite industry experts to share their expertise with students through seminars and talks. You will also get prepared for finding and securing a great job after completing this course through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme. This programme covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques. Accreditation British Computer Society logoThe BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, is the foremost professional and learned society in the field of computers and information systems in the UK. The Division of Computing Science and Mathematics is an Educational Affiliate of the BCS. The MSc in Information Technology course is accredited by the BCS as partially meeting the educational requirements for Chartered Information Technology Professional (CITP) registration. CITP is the professional member level of the BCS ('partially meeting' is the normal level of accreditation for such MSc courses, and does not indicate a shortcoming! Additional training/experience is required for full registration.) Course objectives This is an intensive 12-month course which provides an opportunity for non-computing graduates to develop key specialist skills suitable for a career in Computing. It is ideal for those who wish to complement their knowledge and expertise with core computing skills in order to apply them to a new career. Our company sponsored MSc projects will provide an ideal pathway into the industry. The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. By studying this course students will study in depth key topics including: software development enterprise database systems web technologies benefit from research-led teaching demonstrate acquired research and development skills by undertaking a substantial piece of software project work prepare for positions in the IT industry What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent in any subject other than Computing/IT related subjects. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Science, Computing and Engineering and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS. Scotland’s Saltire Scholarships Scotland’s Saltire Scholarships (SSS) is a substantial programme of scholarships, offered on a matched funding basis between the Government and Scottish Higher Education Institutions. The scheme offers up to 200 awards, each worth £2000. These are towards the tuition fees, for any one year of study, on an Undergraduate, Masters or PhD course at any of Scotland’s higher education institutions. Structure and content This course comprises two 15-week semesters of taught modules, a winter programming assignment over three weeks in January, and the MSc project over three months at the end. Semester 1 concentrates on fundamental techniques. Semester 2 integrates, develops and applies these skills. Practical work is a key component in this course. It builds from self-contained tasks in the first semester, over the larger winter programming assignment, to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project (possibly with a company) is the largest piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. In the Semester 1 you will take the following modules: Principles and Practice of Programming: Covers the designing and testing of programs written in Java. You learn good practice in program construction, programming with data structures and graphical user interfaces Foundations of Information Technology: Covers central topics including machine architecture, operating systems, networks, algorithm efficiency, the limits of computation, software engineering, user interface design, as well as professional and ethical issues Database Principles and Applications: Provides a critical understanding of the role of database management systems and the ability to creatively design and implement practical databases During the winter break there is an extended programming assignment. Semester 2 modules: Networking and Technologies for Ecommerce: Discusses computer networks and their layered architecture. You also study web scripting using PHP, Java script and XML Object-oriented Software Design: Discusses how to analyse and model requirements and develop software using object-oriented analysis and design, through the use of UML and CASE tools for software design Data Analytics: This module looks at Reasoning Systems, Data Mining and the use of probability information in predicting data values. You may graduate with the Postgraduate Diploma after two semesters, or continue with a three-month project and dissertation for the MSc. Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. We offer a number of commercially linked projects for the MSc dissertation period. Topics include mobile phone app development (iPhone, Android, and also cross platform environments), bespoke Java applications, and advanced website development projects. Delivery and assessment You will learn about key areas in computing through lectures, tutorials and practical sessions. Lectures involve the whole class, while tutorials and practicals are for small groups. Practical work is a key component in our degrees, and provides the opportunity for hands-on experience. It builds from self-contained tasks in Semester 1, over a larger programming assignment in the winter break to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project is your largest single piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. After two semesters of classes you will embark on a three-month project working on your dissertation topic. At the end of the project you will write up your findings as your MSc dissertation. For the MSc projects, we will make a number of industrial placements available. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. Stirling is also partner in the Making the Most of Masters initiative, which organises company lead MSc projects. Other project suggestions both from external bodies and from within the University are also offered. Furthermore, students' own ideas for projects are encouraged and welcomed. Strengths Hands on experience & industrial placements Practical work is a key component in our degrees, and provides the opportunity for hands-on experience. It builds from self-contained tasks in Semester 1, over a larger programming assignment in the winter break to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project is your largest single piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. After two semesters of classes you will embark on a three month project working on your dissertation topic. At the end of the project you will write up your findings as your MSc dissertation. For the MSc projects, we will make a number of industrial placements available. We usually place more than 50 percent of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. Stirling is also partner in the Making the Most of Masters initiative, which organises company lead MSc projects. Other project suggestions both from external bodies and from within the university are also offered. Furthermore, students' own ideas for projects are encouraged and welcomed. Computing Science at the University of Stirling supports the Scottish e-Placement project which provides short- and long-term (one-year) placements with Scottish high-tech companies. These placements typically are paid and thus a good way of gaining commercial experience and helping with your living expenses. At Stirling, computing students are prepared for the employer-based MSc projects and the workplace more generally through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme called ‘Lift-Off’. This programme covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques. Career opportunities The MSc in Information Technology will greatly enhance the employment prospects of students. As a graduate of Information Technology, you will be in demand in a range of sectors including health, IT software organisations, service enterprises, engineering and construction firms as well as in the retail sector. Previous students have been very successful in obtaining suitable employment in the Information Technology field in a considerable diversity of posts - some with small companies, others with major UK organisations, with Local Authority and Government bodies as well as in the field of Higher Education. Here are some recent posts that IT students have taken up: IBM, Perth: Junior IT Specialist CAP-GEMINI, Glasgow AIT, Henley-on-Thames: Graduate Trainee Database Administrator Bank of Scotland, Edinburgh: MVS Team (Mainframe Support) British Airways, Hounslow: Programmer Ark Computing Solutions Ltd, Perth: Programmer/Developer Lancaster University, English Dept: Java programmer Rothes Infographics, Livingston: Trainee Software Developer More generally, common job profiles of our graduates are: As a Systems Analyst, you will work on solving computer problems. This might involve adapting existing systems or using new technologies designing a new software solution In doing so, you will design software, write code, and test and fix software applications. You might also be involved in providing documentation for users. Typically, you would work as part of a larger team. IT Consultants closely work with clients (often at the clients premises) and advise them on how to use computer technology and applications to best meet their business needs. You will work with clients to improve their efficiency of using computer systems. This may involve the adaptation/customisation of software applications, or the development of custom applications for the specific needs of the customer. As well as technical duties, you may be involved in project management. Applications Developers translate software requirements into programming code, and will usually specialise in a specific area, such as computer games or web technology. Often developers work as part of a larger team. You may be in charge of developing a certain component or part of a larger application. [-]

MRes in Humanities

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MRes in Humanities is a research preparation Master's programme that offers students the opportunity for Master's study within Arts and Humanities, structured according to personal research interests that are either wholly of one's own design or structured through one of three specified pathways. [+]

The MRes in Humanities is a research preparation Master's programme that offers students the opportunity for Master's study within Arts and Humanities, structured according to personal research interests that are either wholly of one's own design or structured through one of three specified pathways: Hermeneutics Religion and Politics Cultural Representation of Spain and Latin America. It also offers the opportunity to prepare for a PhD through concentrated research in an interdisciplinary environment. Top Reasons To Study With Us You will be taught by experienced staff who are leading experts in their fields. Flexibility in the programme enhances your own independent research in your own areas of interest across disciplines. All contributing staff are engaged in on-going research at the forefront of their disciplines, and are the authors of numerous books, articles and studies on a wide range of relevant subjects. You will be part of a thriving academic community that includes a rich research culture and seminar programmes of visiting academics and industry speakers. You will develop skills that become immensely transferable in a market awaiting competent and innovative thinkers and leaders. Course objectives The MRes offers you the opportunity to pursue a personalised, tailor-made programme of Master’s study in a structured, interdisciplinary, and research-driven environment. Even within the specified pathways, much latitude is provided for your own individual pursuits in each of the areas. The programme is designed to enable you to become a well-trained researcher in a Humanities subject area, showing strong capacity for self-directed work and initiative. Should you wish to do a PhD, the programme enables you to demonstrate fitness in undertaking doctoral research. But it also qualifies you with specialised expertise at the postgraduate level for a professional career within a wide range of employment areas. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The MRes in Humanities offers two tracks: a bespoke research track, in which students develop, in conjunction with their supervisor(s), their own research agenda from beginning to end; and a specified pathway with a taught element in Semester 1 (in either Hermeneutics, Religion and Politics, or Cultural Representation of Spain and Latin America), which then leads to personalising the respective areas of interest in the remainder of the course. The programme follows two semesters - which run from mid-September to late December and from January to the end of May - and a summer period for dissertation writing. The first track of personalised research is composed of the following elements: Research Preparation: A tailor-made programme of study in Semester 1 taught by at least five individual supervisions, on a subject of your choice agreed with the subject areas concerned. This may involve interdisciplinary supervision across subject areas where appropriate. The module allows students to begin work on a topic of particular significance to them personally, one that is cognate to but not identical with their subsequent dissertation. It is assessed by a written assignment of 5,000-6,000 words. Dissertation Preparation: Taken in Semester 2, this module consists in developing the theme and outline for the dissertation itself, which may include a detailed outline of the proposed argument, a literature review or an extended relevant book review, a description or proposal for the application of a methodological framework, or some combination thereof, depending upon the exact nature or the research in question. It will be supervised by the same member of staff whose expertise correlates with the research interest in Module 3. The module will feature a structure of five supervisions and one written assessment. The written assessment will be tailored to the student’s proposed dissertation focus in consultation with the supervisor(s). Research Skills: Our innovative Arts Graduate Training for graduates, which stretches over both semesters, enables students to build up a portfolio of skills that prepare them for academic and professional life. The portfolio is adaptable to individual experience and requirements, and as such covers basic skills (e.g. presentation, bibliography, specific research methods, library research), employability skills (e.g. teaching experience, marking student work, career development event, broaden language knowledge), breadth of knowledge (e.g. conference attention, reading participation group, prepare essay of presentation on a topic beyond own research). You will work with your supervisor(s) to select tasks from a menu of activities relevant to your future ambitions and their necessary qualifications. Dissertation: Subject to successful completion of all elements of the assessment in both Semesters 1 and 2, you will embark on an in-depth dissertation exploring the research topic of your choice, as agreed by and with your supervisor(s), thus building upon the tailor-made tuition or specified pathway. Where feasible, you will be encouraged to present your theme at an appropriate forum such as a Postgraduate conference. The second track of a specified pathway is the same as the first track above, except that it replaces the Semester 1 Research Preparation module with the following: Specified Pathway: A subject-specific module of study in Semester 1, in a weekly, two-hour seminar format, on one of three possible areas: Hermeneutics, Religion and Politics, or Cultural Representation of Spain and Latin America. The module allows students to begin work on a topic with particular focus that can then be personalised in the subsequent semester’s module and in the dissertation. It is assessed by one written essay of 5-6,000 words. The content and concerns for each of the pathways are as follows: Hermeneutics: This pathway deals with key primary texts in the hermeneutical tradition, beginning with the ancient Greeks, and ending with contemporary theory and a play directly to do with questions of interpretation. Principal emphasis, however, will be on modern and late modern theorists. The seminars will cover texts related to history, philosophy, theology and religion, literary criticism, feminism, postcolonialism and theatre. It will be interdisciplinary in scope, therefore, but will be grounded in matters that pertain directly to interpretation and how it is to be understood and theorised. All texts are primary sources, so as to encourage students to interpret and analyse directly from original material, and to address the challenges that reading such demanding texts requires. This is a unique set of seminars covering a vital area rarely taught, if at all, anywhere else. Religion and Politics: This pathway is formulated on the critical assumption that discourses on religion and politics are not timeless, neutral or disinterested, but have emerged in a specific, colonial-oriented context and are therefore intimately related to the power formations of capitalism, becoming integral to contemporary understandings of modernity. By engaging with particular aspects of colonial and postcolonial history and theory in different regions of the world, the seminars seek to enable a critique of these discourses, which will in turn enable a better understanding of the global dynamics of conflict in the contemporary world, including manifestations of neo-colonial power. Engaging in this pathway will allow students to explore in a concentrated form newer approaches to questions of both religion and politics than encountered in the past. Cultural Representations of Spain and Latin America: This pathway offers you the opportunity to study in a comparative and methodologically interdisciplinary framework how Spanish and Latin American cultures are represented through different periods, expressive forms and media. It comprises selected aspects of Spanish and Latin American Studies as embedded in the theoretical debate of cultural representation. The seminars will deepen your understanding of methodological approaches to the fields by focussing upon history, language, literature and visual cultural practices. A long shared past, converging traditions and a common language connect Spain and Spanish-speaking America, but through the broad spectrum of these manifestations it also becomes apparent that there are considerable, perceived differences and cultural diversities between Spanish and Latin American cultures. In this pathway you will study these complex interrelations as they characterise and combine different forms of cultural representation. Delivery and assessment You will attend individual supervisory sessions and/or weekly seminars (specified pathway). The research skills training will provide opportunities for various different learning environments, including Divisional and Faculty seminars, Graduate School workshops, off-campus visits, etc. In addition, students are entitled to take existing advanced level (level 10 or 11) tuition in the subject areas concerned and/or to undertake language tuition at all levels in French and Spanish, or in earlier varieties of English (Old and Middle English), if appropriate. Assessment will include essays, reports (which may take the form of written documents, websites or PowerPoint presentations, depending in your particular research interest), and a research skills portfolio that includes personal reflection. At the end of the second semester, if and where possible, we encourage you to give a presentation of your intended dissertation to an appropriate forum such as a conference or workshop. Strengths In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, around half of the research submitted from the subject areas that now make up the Faculty of Arts and Humanities was judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent in quality, with over 10% of that research placed in the highest (world-leading) category. 85% of the assessed research from the Arts and Humanities was judged to be recognised internationally. Career opportunities Skills you can develop through this programme If an academic career in teaching and research seems like an alluring prospect, this degree will help you to gain the skills for future research work at the doctoral level and give you necessary training in and insight into the research environment of Higher Education. But even if academia is not your professional goal, this MRes or Postgraduate Certificate, with its strong interdisciplinary emphasis, opens up a wide range of fascinating and exciting career possibilities. The skills you will develop here – including close critical analysis of texts and ideas, synthetic thinking that allows you to transfer a set of concepts from one framework or context to another, close reading and dissection of several different discourses, the expression of your ideas in lucid writing and argumentation – become immensely transferable in a market awaiting highly competent and highly innovative thinkers and leaders. Where are our graduates now Students who have graduated from this degree have emerged highly qualified for employment in manifold areas, including the public sector, the voluntary sector, the civil service, the foreign office, non-governmental organisations, international relations, primary and secondary teaching, journalism, the civil service and publishing, the media, the arts, and in many other professional fields and positions well-suited to the training and knowledge gained in the programme. Employability The MRes in Humanities is a research preparation Master’s course that offers students the opportunity for Master’s study within Arts and Humanities, structured according to personal research interests that are either wholly of one’s own design or structured through one of three specified pathways: Hermeneutics, Religion and Politics, and Cultural Representation of Spain and Latin America. It also offers the opportunity to prepare for a PhD through concentrated research in an interdisciplinary environment. [-]

MRes in Historical Research

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2  September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The Master's of Research in Historical Research is a one-year course that is research-oriented and allows specialisation in particular research areas. Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs. Students should maintain regular contact with supervisors through email and an agreed schedule of meetings to discuss their work and review draft submissions. [+]

Top Masters Programs in the Stirling in the United Kingdom. The Master's of Research in Historical Research is a one-year course that is research-oriented and allows specialisation in particular research areas. Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs. Students should maintain regular contact with supervisors through email and an agreed schedule of meetings to discuss their work and review draft submissions. The Master's of Research (MRes) is designed to enable students to become well-trained historians and to demonstrate their fitness to undertake research to doctoral level at Stirling or other universities in Britain and overseas. Both are achieved through the completion of independent study modules, field seminars and skills training, under supervision. It is also possible to follow an Environmental History pathway and complete an MRes in Historical Research: Environmental History Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs. Accreditation The MRes programme and all constituent modules are constructed in line with the University's academic procedures and are fully assessed and externally examined. The programme is recognised by both the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council both of whom have given PhD awards to outstanding Stirling graduates of the MRes. Course objectives This programme prepares you for further research: to co-ordinate the provision of additional or external skills training and to develop the application of research skills students will obtain practical experience of devising and applying a research method to interrogate primary sources qualitative and quantitative analyses the application of IT in information retrieval, especially bibliographical database software, communication skills, written and oral project design involving the conceptualisation of research questions and the presentation of data and data analysis What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Research proposal required (1,500 word maximum). English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content The Master of Research in Historical Research is a one-year programme that is research-oriented and allows specialisation in particular research areas. Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs. Students should maintain regular contact with supervisors through email and an agreed schedule of meetings to discuss their work and review draft submissions. Historiography: Students taking the MRes undertake independent study of the historical literature of a chosen field. Coursework comprises a 10,000-word paper that critically reviews historians' works and identifies a topic suitable for original research in a dissertation (module 4 below). There are no classes; one-to-one supervisory sessions are scheduled at mutually convenient times. Research Skills Training: Students plan a personal itinerary, with direction, that entails attendance at events organised by the Stirling Graduate School and Stirling historians through training modules. Sessions include personal development and career planning, making grant applications, undertaking qualitative and quantitative analyses and database management. An intensive, one-week programme covers history-specific related discipline skills including historical approaches, documentary editing, palaeography, and using biographical sources. Extra classes in languages can be arranged. Students attend History research seminars and present a short working paper at the History postgraduate symposium in June. Coursework involves the preparation of a research bibliography for the dissertation and due performance at skills workshops. Sources and Methods: Students discuss with their supervisor how to apply and develop their research skills. This may entail further training, such as in languages or palaeography, or attendance at external courses on relational database construction or social theory. Students also examine a body of sources related to their research topic, and practice the methods that they have been learning. Coursework comprises: a 5,000-word paper explaining the research 'value' and significance of the selected sources and setting out the appropriate concepts, theories and methods to be used in analysis and interpretation; and a skills test based on methods and sources. Dissertation: Having researched the existing secondary literature and the primary sources, and having received training in appropriate research skills, students now go on to complete a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. Delivery and assessment Delivery is primarily through one to one sessions with the member of staff who will supervise your dissertation and provide direct feedback on Historiography and Sources and Methods. Training and skills elements are planned in discussion with your supervisor and these will comprise activities in four areas: generic skills; employability skills' breadth of knowledge, subject-specific skills. Students must attend the one-week programme and history and related discipline skills in early December and must give a short paper on their own research at the Stirling postgraduate conference in early June. Modes of study The Master's of Research in Historical Research is a one-year taught programme that is research-oriented and allows specialisation in particular research areas. Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs. Students should maintain regular contact with supervisors through email and an agreed schedule of meetings to discuss their work and review draft submissions. Study abroad opportunities A significant proportion of our graduates continue their studies abroad, mainly in the USA. Students who have undertaken the MRes have been successful in securing external funding to help their research abroad. Chris Minty, who graduated from the MRes in 2011 and was awarded a PhD from Stirling in 2015 was awarded two prestigious Fellowships. They were the William A. Dearborn Fellowship in American History, Houghton Library, Harvard University, and a Robert L. Middlekauff Fellowship at the Huntington Library. Chris also held a number of other fellowships: Larry J. Hackman Research Residency, New York State Archives, 2012-2013 Eccles Centre Fellowship, British Library Gilder Lehrman Fellowship, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Jacob M. Price Short-Term Visiting Fellowship, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan United Empire Loyalists Association of Canada Scholarship for 2012-2014 Career opportunities The MRes has been designed with three career destinations in mind: to prepare graduate students for further research at doctoral level as a route to an academic career as a higher degree in its own right The MRes will also enhance continuing professional development, particularly in teaching, journalism, marketing, and heritage management through in-depth study of particular fields; by aiming to develop critical analytical skills and research techniques, the programme provides preparation for a wide variety of research-based careers in the public and private sectors. Most of our graduates go on to study for a PhD either by continuing at Stirling or at another University in the UK, Europe or North America. Recent graduates have secured posts in firms and institutions as varied as Historic Scotland, Sea World, and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl). Chances to expand your horizons There is a lively series of guest lectures which students can attend on this programme. Where are our graduates now? The MRes has been designed with three career destinations in mind: to prepare graduate students for further research at doctoral level and as a route to an academic career as a higher degree in its own right to enhance continuing professional development, particularly in teaching, journalism, marketing, and heritage management through in-depth study of particular fields; by aiming to develop critical analytical skills and research techniques, the programme provides preparation for a wide variety of research-based careers in the public and private sectors Employability Skills you can develop through this programme command of a substantial body of historical knowledge understand how people have existed, acted and thought in the context of the past read and use texts and other source materials critically and empathetically appreciate the complexity and diversity of situations, events and past mentalities recognise there are ways of testing statements and that there are rules of evidence which require integrity and maturity reflect critically on the nature and theoretical underpinnings of the discipline marshal an argument, be self-disciplined and independent intellectually express themselves orally and in writing with coherence, clarity and fluency gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information analyse and solve problems use effectively ICT, information retrieval and presentation skills exercise self-discipline, self-direction and initiative work with others and have respect for others’ reasoned views show empathy and imaginative insight prepare for further academic research such as a Phd In addition, our students have the opportunity to further develop their transferable skills through voluntary internships working on collections of material held within the Division (The Scottish Political Archive and the University's own archive (e.g. UNESCO recognised Royal Scottish National Institution for mentally disabled children). 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MLitt in The Gothic Imagination

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27  September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. [+]

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle. As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence. The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research. Course objectives The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible. The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde. The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath. Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema. At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. A sample of work (e.g. English Essay) is required. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The teaching year at Stirling is divided into two semesters, which run from mid-September to late December, and from January to the end of May respectively. Both full-time and part-time students take four Gothic core modules over two semesters. For part-time students, these core modules are completed in year 1. The core modules in the Autumn semester are as follows: Early British Gothic, 1764-1820 (20 credits) and Victorian Gothic, 1820-1900 (20 credits). The core modules for the Spring semester are Twentieth-century British and American Gothic (20 credits) and Twenty-first-century Gothic (20 credits). In parallel with the core modules, students are required to take one optional module in each semester, each weighted at 20 credits. Part-time students take one optional module in each semester in the second year of study. In addition to allowing for the development of a range of subject-specific skills, these two optional modules are also designed to provide students with a rigorous training in research and employability skills. These modules vary depending on teaching staff, but in the past have included the following: American Gothic: An examination of the emergence and development of Gothic in 19th-century American fiction with particular attention to the ways in which these texts transform the optimistic narratives of the new American republic Gothic in Contemporary Film: An analysis of the ways in which Gothic tropes have been appropriated and reworked in a selection of contemporary films The Female Gothic: A study of selected contemporary texts as reworkings of the female Gothic tradition of Ann Radcliffe Transmutations of the Vampire: An investigation into the cultural significance of the vampire over the past 50 years The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words, written during the summer, on a subject of your choosing, in consultation with a member of English Studies. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction. Delivery and assessment Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed. Strengths The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling is one of the few taught Master's degree courses worldwide that is devoted exclusively to the academic study of the dynamic, ever-expanding field of the Gothic. While aspects of the Gothic feature prominently on undergraduate and graduate university curricula across the globe, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at Stirling is unique in the advanced levels of specialisation and expertise with which it equips its graduates. Long acknowledged as a centre of excellence for the study of the Gothic aesthetic worldwide, the division of English Studies at Stirling has historically been the home of leading Gothic scholars for the last two decades; students on the course thus have the opportunity to work closely with some of the leading researchers in the field. As recruitment patterns reveal, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination enjoys a strong international reputation, and Stirling in the past has been proud to welcome students from as far afield as Argentina, Canada, Greece, Mexico, India, Indonesia, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, South Africa, Spain, Sweden and the USA. With high levels of choice and flexibility built into it, the course structure allows students to develop their own critical interests, though always under the specialist guidance of recognised experts in the broad and exciting field of Gothic Studies. Employability With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research. Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry. The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree. [-]

LLM/MSc in Environmental Policy and Governance

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24  September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The LLM/MSc in Environmental Policy & Governance is a one-year course which combines the study of different fields with an interdisciplinary perspective offering a greater understanding of local, national and international environmental policies and governance. [+]

Top Masters Programs in the Stirling in the United Kingdom. The LLM/MSc in Environmental Policy & Governance is a one-year course which combines the study of different fields with an interdisciplinary perspective offering a greater understanding of local, national and international environmental policies and governance. Top Reasons To Study With Us You will have the opportunity to focus on the identification of effective environmental policy and governance solutions. You will be studying at the University of Stirling, an institution ranked number one in Scotland and eighth in the UK in The Times Higher Education ranking of the world’s best 100 universities under 50 years old. You will benefit from the knowledge and guidance of our expert Environmental Policy and Governance lecturers and practitioners. You will acquire a unique insight from this programme’s interdisciplinary learning approach. You will have access to a wide range of funding possibilities and scholarships. Course objectives This course will: introduce students to the topic of environmental policy and governance, and to develop students' understanding and awareness of contemporary issues in the area provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging training at an advanced level in environmental issues as preparation for, or as an enhancement to, a career in this area. develop independent critical thought, research and writing skills to Master's level What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The course is multi-disciplinary and consists of eight taught modules which are delivered by staff in the Faculties of Arts and Humanities, Management and Natural Sciences. A combination of specialist modules is taken in both Semesters and students will also complete a 10,000-word dissertation over the period 1 June to the middle of August. Research The academics involved in teaching the degree are renowned for international and world leading research in their subject areas. Their work is well represented in national and international journals, at academic conferences around the world and in the media. Delivery and assessment All modules are delivered by small group learning and teaching which aims to provide opportunity for interaction with staff and to develop communication skills through discussion and presentation of key issues. Students are encouraged and expected to undertake independent study and to read widely from a variety of sources. The necessity of independent study culminates in the dissertation written in the summer. This piece of work provides students with opportunity to produce independent research in their chosen area. Modules are assessed typically by a combination of coursework and examination with the weighting varying dependent on the nature of the material taught. An integrated assessment strategy is adopted. Students must pass all eight modules and achieve a pass grade in the dissertation to be awarded the Master of Law (LLM) or MSc. Modes of study For the modules on this course, students are required to attend weekly two-hour seminars for which reading will be circulated in advance. Active participation will be encouraged in class and students may be required to prepare a short presentation which is not assessed on a topic of their choice within the individual modules. Assessment will be in the form of essays and/or exams. Strengths The University of Stirling was founded on the site of the historic Airthrey Estate by Royal Charter in 1967; the first genuinely new university in Scotland for over 400 years. Nestling beneath the Ochil Hills, our campus covers 330 acres and has a beautiful loch and 18th-century Airthrey Castle at its heart. We retain our pioneering spirit and passion for innovation and excellence in all we do. We aim to be at the forefront of research and learning that helps to improve lives. Staff are highly motivated and are experts in their field of research. There is a particular emphasis on inter-disciplinary research drawing on the strengths across the campus. Career opportunities The specialist knowledge acquired in this rapidly growing sector will be invaluable in enhancing employability. This postgraduate degree also provides an excellent starting point for careers in international organisations, local and national government bodies, NGOs, 'green' businesses as well as in the field of further academic research. Employability One of the main focuses of this new course is to provide graduates with the skills and knowledge to compete effectively for employment opportunities in the ever-growing environmental sector. As the course is multi-disciplinary, it addresses the economic, scientific, political and legal challenges facing society and the environment and provides graduates with broad-based yet specialised knowledge and understanding. Accordingly, graduates will be equipped with a distinctive and integrated appreciation of the relevant issues which will significantly enhance their employability. In addition to that, there are different workshop and talks offered by the University to postgraduate students in order to develop new skills and improve job prospects. Through this course students will: Acquire a better understanding of key environmental issues from an interdisciplinary perspective Develop skills to analyse and evaluate environmental policies and solve legal problems Be able to conduct multi-disciplinary research in environmental studies topics Demonstrate the ability to present effective and structured arguments in writing and oral presentations Develop the ability to meet deadlines, prioritize work and complete assignments accurately either independently or as part of a team Industry connections Graduates of the LLM/MSc in Environmental Policy & Governance will be well placed to pursue jobs offered in the sector, including local and national government, regulatory authorities, international bodies, non-governmental organisations, private sector businesses, pressure groups and charities. It is expected that representatives from environmental NGOs and international organisations focusing on environmental issues will deliver presentations to the students. The course will be included in the "Making the Most of Masters", a platform which provides students with the opportunity to work on specific projects with different organisations (www.mastersprojects.ac.uk). This course prepares our graduates for different career options. If you are interested in continuing in education you may apply for a doctoral programme. If you are focused on practice, you will be well placed to pursue a career in law firms, government sector, environmental advocacy, companies, environmental consulting and international organisations. [-]

MLitt in English Language and Linguistics

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27  September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MLitt English Language and Linguistics offers students the opportunity to study the intricate workings of language and explore its central role in society. [+]

The MLitt English Language and Linguistics offers students the opportunity to study the intricate workings of language and explore its central role in society. We investigate how language works, how people use it, what people use it for, where it came from and how it changes. The range of research expertise represented by the three dedicated members of staff teaching on the course are reflected in a comprehensive suite of modules that include cognitive, sociolinguistic, historical, evolutionary, and discourse analytical topics. Course objectives Students will be expected to graduate with a knowledge of contemporary linguistic theories, including both generative and cognitive approaches to linguistic description, and the contexts in which these theories arose. They will also acquire knowledge and understanding in specialist selected areas of study (e.g. Old and Middle English, historical, social and regional varieties of English, language and cognition, discourse analysis and evolutionary linguistics), including critical understanding of research in these areas. They will be able to apply a variety of descriptive linguistic tools to language data and linguistic theories to selected specialist areas of study within English Language and Linguistics, according to their areas of interest. They will learn to plan and manage a Research Project under supervision, undertaking independent research, including keeping track of relevant developments in the chosen field(s) and being able to set them in an appropriate context; they will be able to structure and communicate ideas effectively; gather, evaluate and organise information from multiple sources; and engage with other researchers by writing, debating, and delivering oral and written presentations. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Sample of work (e.g. English Essay) is required. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Delivery and assessment Teaching takes place in the form of small group tutorials, occasional lectures, and sometimes lab sessions, depending on the module taken. All modules offer close and careful supervision, but students are expected to take proper responsibility for their studies. Assessment is via module coursework and the dissertation. Each module is assessed by means of one assignment, some of which may involve practical research investigations. The most significant piece of work on the course will be a 15,000-word dissertation, written during the Summer under supervision. Modes of study Face-to-face, campus-based seminars and lectures; one-to-one guidance and supervision with tutors. Online content (in the form of study resources, lecture slides, discussion boards) is available via Succeed, the University of Stirling's chosen online learning environment. Strengths The English language grouping at Stirling (and staff in the cognate discipline of English Language Teaching in the Faculty of Social Sciences) offers between them a strong and varied set of expertise in linguistic topics, from Historical Linguistics to Evolutionary Linguistics and from Discourse Analysis to Corpus Linguistics. The breadth and range of topics make this an ideal introductory Master's to the subject of Linguistics. Career opportunities Postgraduate degrees in English Language and Linguistics are much sought-after by students across the world, providing a grounding in theories and methods essential for a range of research and teaching careers in disciplines including English Studies, Education, English as a Foreign Language and English for Specific Purposes. Students with postgraduate degrees in English Language and Linguistics are prized for their excellent communication and problem-solving skills, and their ability to analyse and synthesise information rapidly and accurately. They are generally very adaptable and go on to a wide range of careers in all sectors of the economy, such as: private and public sector management and research, marketing and advertising, government administration, journalism, banking and finance, speech therapy. Former graduates from the MLitt have gone on to, for instance, Linguistics Research (in the Healthcare sector) and further study in Speech Therapy (for which a Master's in Linguistics was a prerequisite). In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law. Employability Your MLitt in English Language and Linguistics will provide you with important transferable skills which you will be able to make use of throughout your career. Our course will help you develop your oral and written communication skills so that you can engage in confident and informed debate with a range of audiences. You will be able to design, plan and manage your own independent research projects; you will develop your skills in collecting, analysing and interpreting information, and will be able to structure, contextualise and communicate your ideas and findings effectively. You will play an active part in our regular Language Research Group meetings, which discuss articles on important and controversial linguistic topics. You will have the opportunity to introduce articles of your choice to the group and will develop important skills in leading and managing open-ended discussions. Skills you can develop through this course An MLitt in English Language and Linguistics is acknowledged by potential employers as providing important skills, such as motivation, intelligence and the ability to meet deadlines. Although English is not a specifically vocational degree it offers a number of important transferable skills, such as the ability to write clearly, effectively, accurately and persuasively. Seminar discussion and oral presentations (required by many of our modules) help to develop your spoken communication skills. The critical and reflexive study of a variety of texts (literary and non-literary) teaches you how to analyse and interpret complex information and to apply abstract concepts and theories. Our criteria for assessment also require students to be able to synthesise conclusions, to assimilate existing research and to construct and defend an argument clearly and cogently. Throughout their degrees, our students are also trained to use library and bibliographic resources effectively and appropriately, to reference accurately, and to present their work professionally. All of these skills are essential to many kinds of work, which is why so many employers recognise the value of a MLitt in English Language and Linguistics. [-]

MRes in Educational Research

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27  September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

This innovative course prepares you for doctoral studies and a career in Educational Research through a series of taught modules and a dissertation. Under the expert guidance of a team of leading academics you will learn the skills of research, from conception through to design, methodology and data collection, to analysis, interpretation and dissemination. As part of the course you will engage closely with cutting edge research projects currently being undertaken by Education staff in the Faculty of Social Sciences. [+]

Top Masters Programs in the Stirling in the United Kingdom. This innovative course prepares you for doctoral studies and a career in Educational Research through a series of taught modules and a dissertation. Under the expert guidance of a team of leading academics you will learn the skills of research, from conception through to design, methodology and data collection, to analysis, interpretation and dissemination. As part of the course you will engage closely with cutting edge research projects currently being undertaken by Education staff in the Faculty of Social Sciences. Accreditation The course has been recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council as meeting its requirements for postgraduate research training, and it now forms part of the recognised pathway in educational research for the Scottish Graduate School in the Social Sciences. Top Reasons To Study With Us You will be contributing to the overall research capacity in Education, thereby making a difference to practice and/or policy. You will gain a MRes from a Faculty whose Education programmes are ranked as one of the best in the UK You will be supported in developing the knowledge, skills and understanding of research by expert researchers in Education and the Social Sciences. You will be introduced to leading edge empirical and theoretical research in a multi-disciplinary and mutli-professional environment. You will have the benefits of a flexible programme that supports you through different stages of the research process. Course objectives The MRes is designed to equip you for a career in educational research or as preparation for doctoral study (as a 1 + 3 route to PhD). You will develop a range of research skills and will engage closely with current research projects in Education. The course will offer you: A structured taught course in educational research Excellent preparation for doctoral studies by research First-hand experience of current education research projects in the Faculty of Social Sciences The award of a Master’s degree A course recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) The Faculty of Social Sciences is committed to developing capable educational researchers as well as enabling you to improve your career prospects, employability is an important focus of this course. We aim to: Recruit people with a good degree in social sciences Enable you to undertake collaborative tasks and assignments Enable you to successfully undertake a viable research project, relevant to existing interests in Education, and to fulfil your aims and aspirations for your future doctoral studies or work What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Delivery and assessment The course is designed to meet the Economic and Social Research Council’s requirements for broad knowledge, practical skills and both generic and specific competencies in educational research. It comprises taught modules and a dissertation. The taught modules are delivered Education and Social Science experts from the Faculty of Social Sciences. Summative assessment for modules will be based on coursework and will be assessed through assignments approximately 3000 words in. length. Dissertation Students will be required to conduct a small piece of educational research and write this up as a 15,000-word dissertation to be completed during May to September (May to December for part-time students). Career opportunities The MRes in Education Research is designed to enhance the career prospects of researchers in education, training and related areas of work, and professionals requiring the capacity to understand and commission research in these fields. It is essential preparation for doctoral research in education and is recognised by Economic and Social Research Council as meeting its criteria for postgraduate research training that helps students improve their employability while acquiring core research skills. Employability is an important focus of this course, with the opportunity for a research placement offered to all MRes students. [-]