Masters Program in Environmental Economics in the Netherlands

Search Master's Programs in Environmental Economics in the Netherlands

Environmental Economics

Master-level studies involve specialized study in a field of research or an area of professional practice. Earning a master’s degree demonstrates a higher level of mastery of the subject. Earning a master’s degree can take anywhere from a year to three or four years. Before you can graduate, you usually must write and defend a thesis, a long paper that is the culmination of your specialized research.

A Masters in Environmental Economics is aimed at students from very different backgrounds that do not necessarily include trained economists. It is aimed at providing the student with the skills to look at environmental issues and problems using economic tools and models. It requires the teaching of resource economics, game theory, econometrics as well as micro and macroeconomics.

The people, language, and culture of the Netherlands is referred to as "Dutch". A modern European country today, Netherlands preserved its highly international character and is known for its liberal mentality. The Netherlands has many universities. The country has recently converted their own titles into the bachelor/master system. There are two types of universities: Academic (focussing more on theoretical knowledge, aka "Universiteit") or Applied Sciences (focussing more on practical knowledge, aka "Hogeschool")

Master Program in Environmental Economics in the Netherlands

Read More

Master in Spatial, Transport and Environmental Economics (STREEM)

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Campus Full time September 2017 Netherlands Amsterdam

A Master’s in Spatial, Transport and Environmental Economics offers excellent career prospects. Many graduates find jobs as policy economists with the... [+]

Master in Spatial, Transport and Environmental Economics (STREEM)


The programme offers you the possibility to specialize in spatial, transport or environmental economics.Spatial Economics: analyse how various forces contribute to spatial dynamics and network development from a mainly microeconomic perspective; explore the use and further development of various techniques, methods and tools in this field.Transport Economics: focus on the causes and consequences of a growing demand for mobility from a microeconomic perspective; address problems such as congestion, reliability, safety and environmental externalities.Environmental Economics: focus on economic aspects of environmental problems and policy; combine scientific and policy expertise; address the need to integrate economics with insights from other disciplines, notably the environmental sciences. ... [-]